HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » General Discussion (Forum) » 88-year-old finally meets...

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 10:52 AM

88-year-old finally meets daughter she thought had died in childbirth

The Baby Scoop Era was so evil.

~snip~

An 88-year-old woman who thought her only child died during childbirth 69 years ago learned her daughter is still alive through an Ancestry DNA kit.

Genevieve Purinton, who lives in an assisted living home in Tampa, Florida, met her daughter, Connie Moultroup, for the first time on Monday, according to FOX 13.

They were reconnected after Moultroup received an Ancestry DNA kit for Christmas last year and learned the name of her mother.

Research led her to the telephone number of a cousin, who put her in touch with Purinton.

"It's been a lifetime of wanting this," Moultroup, who lives in Vermont, told FOX 13. "I remember being 5 years old, wishing I could find my mother."

https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/lifestyle-buzz/an-88-year-old-woman-was-reunited-with-her-daughter-69-years-after-thinking-her-baby-had-died-during-childbirth/ar-BBQx1FE?ocid=spartandhp


There is also a link in the story to another article, that goes into a little more detail.

~snip~

A woman who was falsely told that her baby had died in childbirth 69 years ago, met her daughter for the first time.

On Monday, Genevieve Purinton, 88, and her daughter, Connie Moultroup, hugged for the first time. They met in a Tampa, Fla., nursing home after connecting through a $59 DNA kit from Ancestry.com that Moultroup received last Christmas, reported Fox 13.

ďI discovered I had a first cousin whose mother was named Genevieve Purinton ó when we talked on the phone she said, ĎThatís my auntís name and sheís still alive,'Ē Moultroup tells Yahoo Lifestyle.

When Purinton gave birth to her daughter at age 18 in an Indiana hospital, she was told a life-altering lie. ďI was a young, unwed mom, and they said my baby died during birth,Ē Purinton tells Yahoo Lifestyle. Purinton wasnít provided a death certificate and she never had more children.

https://ca.style.yahoo.com/mother-reunites-daughter-69-years-apart-christmas-miracle-012444877.html

36 replies, 3133 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 36 replies Author Time Post
Reply 88-year-old finally meets daughter she thought had died in childbirth (Original post)
StevieM Dec 6 OP
Sanity Claws Dec 6 #1
CaliforniaPeggy Dec 6 #2
madaboutharry Dec 6 #3
StevieM Dec 6 #4
kimmylavin Dec 6 #9
get the red out Dec 6 #30
The Genealogist Dec 6 #5
StevieM Dec 6 #6
malaise Dec 6 #7
StevieM Dec 6 #31
IronLionZion Dec 6 #8
StevieM Dec 6 #10
LakeSuperiorView Dec 6 #11
citizen blues Dec 6 #14
StevieM Dec 6 #16
citizen blues Dec 7 #32
Grammy23 Dec 6 #12
StevieM Dec 6 #20
StarryNite Dec 6 #13
sprinkleeninow Dec 6 #15
StevieM Dec 6 #18
mithnanthy Dec 6 #17
StevieM Dec 6 #19
mithnanthy Dec 6 #22
StevieM Dec 6 #23
mithnanthy Dec 6 #27
StevieM Dec 6 #29
mithnanthy Dec 7 #36
pnwmom Dec 7 #34
hostalover Dec 6 #21
StevieM Dec 6 #24
hostalover Dec 6 #25
StevieM Dec 6 #26
jberryhill Dec 6 #28
druidity33 Dec 7 #35
pnwmom Dec 7 #33

Response to StevieM (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 10:54 AM

1. Such cruelty

Glad they were reunited finally.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to StevieM (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 10:56 AM

2. What a travesty that this loss happened so long ago!

But now, the joy of reunification! I am so glad these two found each other.

I hope they will have at least a few years to bind up the wounds that were caused by the wrongful separation.

A Christmas miracle, indeed!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to StevieM (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 11:00 AM

3. There is a wonderful book titled "The Girls Who Went Away" by Ann Fessler

I cried the whole way through it. It tells the story of the disgraceful corruption and criminality in the adoption industry in the 20th century. There are moving and heartbreaking stories and unspeakable injustices on every page.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to madaboutharry (Reply #3)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 11:22 AM

4. I have long intended to read that book. I have even referenced it to other people.

It is good to have some books that document the crimes of the adoption industry.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to madaboutharry (Reply #3)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 12:14 PM

9. Was just coming to post about that...

Wonderful, heartbreaking book.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to madaboutharry (Reply #3)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 04:59 PM

30. Heart-wrenching book

I was in tears reading it too.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to StevieM (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 11:24 AM

5. A hewrtwarming outco,e to be sure but much more

A DNA test has righted an injustice. How cruel to lie to a young mother that she lost a child. How long did this woman mourn the death of a child who was actually still alive? And we have a cabal of people who want to roll this country back to days when this was perfectly acceptable behavior.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Genealogist (Reply #5)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 11:27 AM

6. That is exactly right. The GOP wants a return to the Baby Scoop Era. (eom)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to StevieM (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 11:42 AM

7. Her baby was stolen

Kidnapped.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to malaise (Reply #7)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 07:25 PM

31. Yep. It is called the Baby Scoop Era for a reason.

And, sadly, this was not at all uncommon during that time period.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to StevieM (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 12:08 PM

8. Pretty shitty of that hospital to steal her baby and lie to her

And they probably have not had to face any consequences

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to IronLionZion (Reply #8)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 12:15 PM

10. Sadly, it was not totally uncommon at the time.

This was the Baby Scoop Era. The worst offenders were Georgia Tann in Tennessee and Bessie Bernard. But there were others.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to IronLionZion (Reply #8)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 12:18 PM

11. I don't know that a hospital would do that on it's own.

The grandparents probably had a hand in it. It's certainly possible that only the hospital is to blame, but I consider that unlikely.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to LakeSuperiorView (Reply #11)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 12:51 PM

14. You're probably right.

Iím adopted. Because my mother was only 16 when I was born, it was my grandmotherís choice, and she couldnít get rid of me fast enough. Up until the 70ís, underage mothers had no parental rights. Because this lady was 18, telling her the baby died was the only way they could take her daughter. (She gave birth at a time when they were still drugging mothers during childbirth.)

I wonder how many more cases like this one are out there.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to citizen blues (Reply #14)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 01:21 PM

16. It sounds like you were born during the Baby Scoop Era.

One way or another, they were going to get the TPR. Laws varied from state to state, so in some places minors might have had to sign surrender papers. But that doesn't mean they wanted to. The coercion and the lying was usually intense.

There are a lot of cases like this one. Georgia Tann, of the Tennessee Children's home Society was the worst offender. But the nation-wide effort was relentless.

And, yes, drugged up mothers were often a major part of the strategy utilized by the adoption industry.

I hope you were able to reunite with your first mother.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to StevieM (Reply #16)

Fri Dec 7, 2018, 02:16 AM

32. Yes, I was born in the mid-60s.

I did find my mother and had a really good relationship with her unti she passed. She told me that she wasnít suppose to even know my gender, but she just didnít tell anyone she was in labor until it was too late to put the screen up. What they did manage to keep off my records was that I was a fraternal twin, but my brother didnít survive.

Greece is the worst Iíve heard about. From the 30ís up to the 60ís Greece actively kidnapped babies and small children and shipped them all over the world to adoptive parents of Greek descent. Doctors would take sick children to a back area for treatment, then tell the parents their child had died. They would even give them a child sized coffin with cadaver parts inside so it would be the right weight. When this story broke in the 90s, Greek families were digging up the graves of their children to find out their babies werenít there. I canít even imagine what that horror must have been like.

I dated someone who was adopted out of a Greek orphanage by Greek-American parents, and based on his papers, he was without a doubt one of these stolen babies. I donít think he ever found his family.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to StevieM (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 12:18 PM

12. I have a friend (from college days) who got pregnant when she was about 16.


Her parents arranged for her to have ďa D&CĒ to end the pregnancy. Her mom was a registered nurse so she had connections that helped them get this done when the procedure (basicly an abortion) was illegal. She had NO say in the matter and held it against her parents ....maybe even still harboring resentment after all these years later. I knew her parents and think they thought they were doing the best thing they could for her. And maybe they were. But the fact that they gave her no control over the matter was terrible and caused her decades of pain.

The girls who had their babies essentially stolen were likewise subjected to many years of pain and grief. I canít imagine telling someone their baby died when, in fact, it was alive and well. These stories will come out thanks to DNA tests and maybe resolve some of the anguish before these women die of old age, often with broken hearts.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Grammy23 (Reply #12)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 01:41 PM

20. We need to bring justice to the surivors of the Baby Scoop Era while some of them are still alive.

There were also many girls who were not told their babies died. They were bullied into signing surrender papers and told they could never see their children again, or know what became of them. Society said that they would simply forget and move on with their lives.

We need to help these women reunite with their children while they are still alive.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to StevieM (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 12:21 PM

13. How many times was that atrocity repeated?

Just terrible. Happy they finally did reunite.

Last spring my nephew was reunited with a daughter he never knew he had. She's in her early 30s now. Her mother thought the bio dad was an ex boyfriend who died shortly after the birth of her daughter. The daughter did the Ancestry.com test just to see what her background was having absolutely no idea her bio father was alive and well. It was really exciting for our whole family.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to StarryNite (Reply #13)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 01:16 PM

15. Happening not that long ago in the Good Ole USofA.



Gladness for your family and all those who receive a 'miracle' in being reunited with their parents. Bless!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to StarryNite (Reply #13)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 01:27 PM

18. Congratulations to your nephew for reuniting with the daughter he never knew he had!!

What a wonderful story for your family, especially your newly found great niece.

I do feel bad for the family of the man who was thought to be the father. Did they stay in the child's life after the young man died? Are they struggling to deal with the knowledge that she isn't a blood relative like they had thought?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to StevieM (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 01:24 PM

17. I was adopted at 5 days old.

My adoptive father was a Doctor and my adopted mother was a nurse. They knew who my natural mother was but never told me who she was. They weren't loving people towards me at all and they only wanted the status of having a boy and a girl. (my adopted brother isn't blood related to me.) My adopted parents would never let me search for her. However, I was able to leave them when I was 18 and continued searching. I finally found the adoption agency that they legally had to go through. When I turned 70 years old, my adoptive parents finally told me who and where she was. (they knew she had just died). She had lived only 10 miles from our home, all those years. She died two years before I finally could have found her.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mithnanthy (Reply #17)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 01:31 PM

19. Your story is heartbreaking. It is disgraceful that we live in a country with sealed birth records

for adoptees. It makes them into second class citizens.

Everyone is entitled to the story of their origins. And everyone is entitled to their original birth certificate.

If you had been given what you were entitled to you could have found your mother before she died. I am sure that it would have meant the world to her.

Did you meet her family? Do you have half-siblings? Did you hear the story of your beginnings from her point of view?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to StevieM (Reply #19)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 01:47 PM

22. I eventually met two half brothers and one half sister...

Supposedly, my Mother's husband, (not my father) didn't want anything to do with me and neither did my half siblings. I was just an unwelcome visitor in their lives. I have a wonderful husband and 3 cats. They are all the love of my life. Thank you for your kind words.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mithnanthy (Reply #22)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 01:59 PM

23. I hope it is OK to ask a few questions about your story.

Last edited Thu Dec 6, 2018, 04:15 PM - Edit history (1)

Did you get the story of your origins? Did you hear what your mother's feelings on the matter had been for all those years? Had she been hoping to find you? Did you learn the identity of your biological father?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to StevieM (Reply #23)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 04:18 PM

27. The story is interesting...

When my mother was about 16, her boyfriend went in the service and was missing in Korea (I think). She presumed he had died over there. Two years later, she began to date and got pregnant with me. Her Father wouldn't let her keep me so my adopted Father (the Doctor) decided he and his wife would add me to their family. They had already adopted a boy two years earlier. So they had "the perfect family", a boy and a girl. My adopted Mother had a bad childhood (her Mother had left her and her two sisters when they were young) and she was very disturbed. She wanted to marry a Doctor and she got her wish. She hired one Nanny after another and she told them to never cuddle or kiss me. She fired them all, one by one, so I would never have a steady "mother figure". When I was three years old I said to her "I love you Mommy" and she freaked out on me and screamed "I'm NOT your Mother and He's not your Father and He's not your Brother! Your Mother didn't want you so we took you in" (this was in 1949). I grew up real fast after that. I loved our black housekeeper and my Father's nurse (Office was attached to our house). The nurse and housekeeper keep their distance from my adopted Mother. Fast forward, I left home on my 18th Birthday, in search for my real Mother. Years passed and my adopted parents had me "shunned" in our small town for 8 years. At 18 I married a local boy because they gave me a place to live and had a son 3 years later. We were poor and I worked many jobs (factory, vet assistant to my friend, I installed car windows, was a maid to a wealthy woman (who was very nice to me.) Was a porcelain decorator to a famous sculpture Edward Marshall Boehm. and many other jobs. Years passed and I got divorced and my son moved away. Nearing my 70th Birthday I approached my adopted Mother and Father and they gave me the name of the adoption agency they used to make my adoption legal by New Jersey, law at that time. My real Mother had gotten pregnant and had to give me up. She got the big shock that her original boyfriend was FOUND and he came home from the war, only to find out she had had a baby and had given me away. He NEVER wanted to hear of me or know of me. As I said previously, the adoption agency found my records and I immediately tried to contact my real mother but she had died 2 years earlier. I did meet my brothers and sister but it was an empty relationship. One brother still writes me, now and then. He's nice. Well, that's the story. I have a wonderful husband now and we've been married 42 years. He's an entertainer and we live in Florida with our three kitties. Life is pretty good...now. Hope that gives you an idea of what life can be for some adopted people. I never found out who my real Father was.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mithnanthy (Reply #27)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 04:53 PM

29. Thank you for sharing your story.

Here are some thoughts about what you wrote:

First, you might be able to track down some paternal relatives through Ancestry, FamilyTreeDNA and 23andme. If you find a 2nd cousin you can work backwards and figure out who your father is, and what half-siblings and nephews/nieces you might have.

Second, if you can figure out who some of your mom's old friends were you might be able to learn more about what her feelings were towards your loss. She probably kept the secret close to home, but someone she had known for a long time, maybe an adoptive cousin, might have been someone she opened up to.

Third, I hope that you have some contact with your son. I know it must have been hard for you when he moved away. But maybe he has children that would like to draw closer to their grandmother.

Fourth, if you were 3 in 1949 then that means that you were born in 1946. It sounds like this outburst from your a-mom is your earliest memory...I am so sorry.

The Korean War didn't break out until 1950. So maybe some of the details you were given were wrong.

Fifth, if you were born in New Jersey then you are allowed to receive your original birth certificate. That might provide you with some additional information.

https://www.nj.gov/health/vital/adoption/

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to StevieM (Reply #29)

Fri Dec 7, 2018, 10:58 AM

36. Thank you StevieM for your advice.

I have tried to find information about my real Father on Ancestry and 23andme to no avail. I also have reached out to my real mother's sisters, to no avail. They don't remember anything. As for my son, he is bi-polar with Narcissist Personality Disorder and never wants children. (I also spoiled him so much). He doesn't want anything to do with me and he dislikes my husband who has been wonderful and supportive of him. Yes, I guess my earliest memory was my adopted Mother's outburst to me. Supposedly my real Mother's boyfriend was captured in Korea while he was there serving and eventually escaped and returned home to find out she had given her illegitimate child (me) away. He then married her and he never wanted anything to do with me when I discovered my siblings. Thank you again, StevieM, and best wishes to you.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mithnanthy (Reply #17)

Fri Dec 7, 2018, 03:04 AM

34. I am so very sorry that happened to you.

This is why I support open adoptions, leaving the door open for whatever relationship the birth mother and adoptive parents decide upon.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to StevieM (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 01:43 PM

21. Another good book concerning babies being stolen and put in orphanages in S. Carolina in

the 30's, 40's and 50's is Before We Were Yours by Lisa Wingate. It is realistic fiction but based on true events. Sometimes young children were stolen. From the orphanage they were basically sold to adoptive parents although some remained in the orphanage. Georgia Tann figures prominently. Evil woman.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to hostalover (Reply #21)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 02:00 PM

24. Georgia Tann was, for all intents and purposes, a serial killer. (eom)

Last edited Thu Dec 6, 2018, 04:10 PM - Edit history (1)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to StevieM (Reply #24)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 03:30 PM

25. Yes, she was. And incredibly she received much praise for her work in the

adoption world. She was seen as a forerunner of some sort. If I remember it correctly, the truth was just coming out about her when she died from cancer. She didn't have to answer for her crimes.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to hostalover (Reply #25)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 04:09 PM

26. That is exactly right. Her victims never got justice because she died right when they were finally

exposing her actions.

At the height of Georgia Tann's heyday, Memphis had the highest infant mortality rate in the country.

Bessie Bernard was another gem from that era.

http://www.oocities.org/heartland/lake/5803/bessie.html

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to StevieM (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 04:24 PM

28. Stories like this always make me wonder...

ďOkay, and at what point did someone call a reporter?Ē Like.. who, and why?

This is a very well timed Christmas story, since the kits are sold as gifts.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to jberryhill (Reply #28)

Fri Dec 7, 2018, 05:50 AM

35. and the data is owned by

pharmaceutical companies?


Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to StevieM (Original post)

Fri Dec 7, 2018, 03:02 AM

33. "In childbirth" usually means "while giving birth" so I was confused at first,

wondering how an adult daughter could somehow be spirited away like that.

I'm so glad this women finally found the baby she'd lost at birth -- but how sad that they've missed all those decades. And I'm angry with the system that did this to them.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread