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Sat Oct 20, 2018, 12:07 PM

 

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. That book changed how I looked at life itself.

Recent events reminded me of this book. White people attacking Indians in North Dakota. Trump hanging a picture of President Jackson in the oval office. A man who covered himself in Indian blood. I read that book roughly 45 years ago as a young teenager and it broke my heart. I became a big fan of the American Indian. All these years later I still remember many of the names. Captain Jack, Chief Joseph, Roman Nose, Red Cloud and my favorite, Crazy Horse.

The book shocked me because as a white male I realized my culture, my society had lied to me. We were taught Indians were dumb blood thirsty savages. Custer was a great hero who died at the little Big Horn. No, Custer was an arrogant fool who had zero respect for the Indians and it got him and all his men killed. It was all lies. I began to wonder, what other lies was I being taught?

That moment as a young teenager I began to question everything. I blindly followed nothing or no one. I started to rebel. I realized you had to educate yourself. You had to search for the truth yourself. I became a skeptic, I needed proof.

As a white man I completely understand white people cannot honestly call themselves a great race, a great people until they atone for the sins they committed against the Indians and African Americans. We are still attacking them. We are covered in their blood. We are not white, we are bloody red.

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Reply Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. That book changed how I looked at life itself. (Original post)
shockey80 Oct 2018 OP
G_j Oct 2018 #1
ellie Oct 2018 #2
MaryMagdaline Oct 2018 #3
cilla4progress Oct 2018 #4
notdarkyet Oct 2018 #9
Stuart G Oct 2018 #5
MaryMagdaline Oct 2018 #7
notdarkyet Oct 2018 #10
Totally Tunsie Oct 2018 #16
dameatball Oct 2018 #6
Mendocino Oct 2018 #8
Bob Loblaw Oct 2018 #21
cilla4progress Oct 2018 #11
spike jones Oct 2018 #12
cachukis Oct 2018 #13
mobeau69 Oct 2018 #14
SeattleVet Oct 2018 #15
shockey80 Oct 2018 #17
shockey80 Oct 2018 #18
Marengo Oct 2018 #30
spike jones Oct 2018 #19
workinclasszero Oct 2018 #20
Martin Eden Oct 2018 #22
lancelyons Oct 2018 #23
ghostsinthemachine Oct 2018 #24
ifihad2 Oct 2018 #25
Duppers Oct 2018 #28
ifihad2 Oct 2018 #31
Duppers Oct 2018 #32
Ohiogal Oct 2018 #26
DownriverDem Oct 2018 #27
OregonBlue Oct 2018 #33
colsohlibgal Oct 2018 #29

Response to shockey80 (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 12:14 PM

1. Absolutely! Every American should read it!!

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Response to shockey80 (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 12:15 PM

2. That book changed my

husband, too. It opened his eyes to the atrocities committed by the U.S. government.

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Response to shockey80 (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 12:19 PM

3. That book was world changing

Even so, with strong liberal leanings, the ability to blind myself to evil still shocks me.

One day, a few years ago, I looked at baby pictures of an American-born Ecuadorian child. Such strong native festures. Seconds later, l had an earth shattering realization that I could travel from Miami to Seattle and might not see one single native face, although every central and South American in south Florida had prominent native features. This is when I realized that the American Holocaust had been complete devastation, with barely a remnant of Native Anericans surviving.

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Response to shockey80 (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 12:23 PM

4. Fabulous!

I was very fortunate to work in Native communities for 4 years in the early 2000s, writing free Wills for tribal members under a nonprofit grant. You can imagine how their land tenure rights were stolen and eviscerated.

During that period I read many memoirs and biographies of Native American heroes, beginning of course with Dee Brown's masterpiece. I'd avoided it because I knew how painful it would be. Infuriating that they aren't seen as the national heroes they are!

Those 4 years shaped me, taught and inspired me, and brought me much joy and laughter.

Until we go through Truth and Reconciliation here, we will always be marked by bloodstains. I have far more confidence in our communities of color here, than I ever would in my own white "race."

Have you read Zinn's A Peoplevs History of the US? Highly recommend, also.

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Response to cilla4progress (Reply #4)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 12:50 PM

9. Two of my favorite books of all time. Still have bury my heart and Zinn on iPad.

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Response to shockey80 (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 12:24 PM

5. I think I got up to page 250 or so..couldn't read any more..

The massacre at Sand Creek is horrible, and I had to stop reading because I knew there was worse coming. But the massacre of Native Americans throughout our history is actually beyond belief. It is an unknown story to most of us. I grew up in the 50s where there was media hatred of Indian life. We had no positive views other than "Lone Ranger and Tonto"..
...If one really wants to know how the 500 groups of Native Americans were treated by the United States Government, an individual must read this book. Warning: it is probably one of the saddest books that you will ever read. And it is all true...
...

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Response to Stuart G (Reply #5)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 12:36 PM

7. That was the chapter where I lost it

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Response to Stuart G (Reply #5)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 12:52 PM

10. And documented in government records.

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Response to Stuart G (Reply #5)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 01:29 PM

16. Ahhhh, Stuart G.- Twice in the same week the subject of the Sand Creek Massacre

is being discussed in this forum. (We met over this in the Lounge in a movie category:https://www.democraticunderground.com/10181134413#post14).

The good news is it has not been forgotten by those of us who know of it. The need is for it to be exposed to those who aren't aware of it.

Peace.

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Response to shockey80 (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 12:28 PM

6. I read it at almost the same age. It opened my eyes as well.

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Response to shockey80 (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 12:46 PM

8. Both the book and the film

Little Big Man came out at the same time. Changed my life.

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Response to Mendocino (Reply #8)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 02:00 PM

21. Top 5 favorite movie

I queue it up at least once a year. Great depiction of Custer.

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Response to shockey80 (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 12:59 PM

11. Truth

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Response to shockey80 (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 01:22 PM

13. On a trip out west some years ago had to go to the site.

It is out of the way, but it is not comemorated as I had hoped. The sad chapters of our history often go unnoticed. Paid a local at a flea market type stand to point out how the massacre unfolded. Never forgot the impact of the book and realized then and there it would be a lonely place to die if you didn't appreciate the beauty of the grasslands. Went to the local hotel looking for a room and was told that it was booked. The gravel lot was empty. Turns out there was to be a Sundance ceremony that night and the revelers would show up later and dance until the sun rose. We could plug into the outside wall and camp under the tree outback. While cooking dinner we were visited by a lonely dog. In the background the grasses were swept by the wind. Went to bed around 9 and were wakened at midnight by the ceremony. How our ancestors missed the wonder of that ancient heritage plays out today.

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Response to shockey80 (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 01:22 PM

14. I shall not be there. I shall rise and pass. Bury my heat at Wounded Knee.

The white man made us many promises but they kept just one. They promised to take our land and they took it.

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Response to shockey80 (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 01:25 PM

15. Read it when it came out, and it was very eye-opening.

Another excellent book is Vine Deloria's 'Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto', which had come out the year before. The information in the combination of the two was a real shocker and wake-up call for me, given the 'American History' we had been taught since beginning school.

A year or so after reading these two our family went on a summer vacation to visit my grandparents in rural Eastern Tennessee (Rogersville). Since I was going to be entering the Air Force a month or so later, we did a few side trips and visited Cherokee, North Carolina. Not sure what it is like now, but back then I was astounded to see that the few Native Americans that I saw were the clerks and menial laborers in the shops and restaurants, and white people were the managers and bosses. After having read both books, I saw this as yet another example of the levels of exploitation that were still ongoing, even at that late date.

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Response to shockey80 (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 01:33 PM

17. " I will fight no more forever"

 

Chief Joseph.

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Response to shockey80 (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 01:36 PM

18. Wasn't Custer at the Sand Creek massacre?

 

I believe so.

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Response to shockey80 (Reply #18)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 04:56 PM

30. That was Chivington. IIRC Custer was at the siege of Petersburg when Sand Creek occurred.

 

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Response to shockey80 (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 01:46 PM

19. Sand Creek Massacre Witness Accounts

I dare you to read this. Warning.
http://sandcreekmassacre.net/witness-accounts/

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Response to shockey80 (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 01:56 PM

20. Read that book driving back from SD after visiting the Crazy Horse monument site

 

Forty some years later, the monument is still under construction, wow. We actually bought the book there as well.

Dad was driving I was 14 or so, the navigator on the trip with a big Rand-McNally road atlas at hand.

Totally blew my mind and changed my thinking forever as well. It had the same effect on my older sister.

This country has committed some horrendously evil acts, genocide against the Native Americans and slavery being the worst.

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Response to shockey80 (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 02:11 PM

22. Thank you, shockey80

That book should be required reading in school.

My first eye opener was when I was a young teen and my father took me took me to see the movie Little Big Man. I read Bury My Heart several years later, followed by I Will Fight No More Forever.

How can a human being not be moved by this history, or continue to hold racial animosity?

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Response to shockey80 (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 02:18 PM

23. Agreed.. what we did to Native Americans was atrocious.

 

Alot of that hate is still out there in the GOP.

at the same time, I could not figure out why the Cherokee would try to come out against Sen Warren or at minimum distance themselves from her.

If Senator Warren is correct and one has to believe she is telling the truth and has some facts to back that up, one of her Ancestors was a Cherokee full blooded Indian. Having the Cherokee tribe come out against a descendant of a full Cherokee seem to be a slap in the face to that ancestor. Some disrespect. This normally isnt the way Indian tribes work.

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Response to shockey80 (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 02:18 PM

24. Thank you.

I too read it and it changed my life as well. The fight, and flight of Chief Joseph and the Nez Perce is a dark chapter in US history. Wounded Knee, purely genocide.

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Response to shockey80 (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 02:21 PM

25. Re: Native Americans, Water Protectors - please consider this, pledge to boycott Nestle

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Response to ifihad2 (Reply #25)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 03:05 PM

28. Done and sent out.

There's a heck of a lotta brands to boycott but I promise to do my best.

Aero, Alpo, Baker's Complete, Beneful, Blue Bottle Coffee, Boost, Buitoni, Butterfinger, Cailler, Carnation, Cat Chow, Cerelac, Chef, Chef Michael’s Canine Creations, Chef Mate, Chocapic, Cini Minis, Coffee-Mate, Cookie Crisp, Crunch, DiGiorno, Dog Chow, Dreyers, Esrelitas, Extrême, Fancy Feast, Felix, Fitness (cereal), Friskies, Gerber, Gerber Graduates, Gormet (cat food), Häagen-Dazs, Herta, Hot Pockets, Jack’s (pizza), KitKat, La Laitière, Lean Cuisine, Milo, Miners, Mövenpick (ice cream), NaturNes, NesCafé, Nespresso, Nesquik, Nestea, Nestum, Nido, Nutren Junior, Optifast, Orion, Peptemen, Perrier, Poland Spring, Purina, Purina ONE, Purina Pro Plan, Resource, San Pellegrino, Sjora, Smarties, Starbucks, Stouffer’s, Thomy, Tollhouse, Tombstone, Wonka


And I've been to Starbucks only twice in my life.

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Response to Duppers (Reply #28)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 06:01 PM

31. thanks, Dupper

Hey Dupper ... thanks very much ... it is a lot ... but some better than none ... also, I'm not Starbucks customer either, too expensive, I'm getting close to that hobo coffee in the can ... :O) thanks again for response ... also, a little off topic but re: ground water pumping ... Saudi's own dairy farms here, in central AZ ... raising alfalfa and exporting all back home ... is horrible since we are in drought ... right now there are no pumping restrictions for farming so they have carte blanche ... this is after they just about destroyed their aquifers ... makes me crazy ...

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Response to ifihad2 (Reply #31)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 06:17 PM

32. Omg. And that's not off-topic.

Unbelievable.

Thank you.

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Response to shockey80 (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 02:32 PM

26. I agree

it should be required reading in all schools today.

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Response to shockey80 (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 03:02 PM

27. Black Elk Speaks

I read Black Elk Speaks as part of an American History class at Western Michigan University. It totally gave me a different perspective.

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Response to DownriverDem (Reply #27)

Sun Oct 21, 2018, 01:01 PM

33. I read Black Elk and Wounded Knee. it started

Me on a whole new journey. From there I went to EdgaEdgar Snows books about China and Mao, etc.
So great when a book opens your mind to wanting to learn the truth instead of the pablum you were taught in school.

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Response to shockey80 (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2018, 03:54 PM

29. The Right Is So Tone Deaf

They keep portraying themselves as original inhabitants of America when that is 100% false. We took this land from the original inhabitants by force, breaking treaty after treaty.

I wonder if the mentally challenged creep now in the White House grasps this, I doubt it.

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