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Sat May 12, 2018, 08:30 AM

Gen. Kelly.....




WH Chief of Staff John Kelly, asked about separating migrant families at the border, tells @NPR,
“They don’t integrate well. They don’t have skills.”




https://www.npr.org/2018/05/11/610116389/transcript-white-house-chief-of-staff-john-kellys-interview-with-npr

25 replies, 3718 views

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Arrow 25 replies Author Time Post
Reply Gen. Kelly..... (Original post)
kpete May 2018 OP
Docreed2003 May 2018 #1
spanone May 2018 #2
Ohiogal May 2018 #3
RKP5637 May 2018 #4
Lonestarblue May 2018 #5
KY_EnviroGuy May 2018 #6
cannabis_flower May 2018 #17
KY_EnviroGuy May 2018 #22
cannabis_flower May 2018 #25
Kurt V. May 2018 #8
Lonestarblue May 2018 #20
paleotn May 2018 #10
MarvinGardens May 2018 #16
sarge43 May 2018 #23
sarge43 May 2018 #7
tblue37 May 2018 #13
sarge43 May 2018 #15
bronxiteforever May 2018 #9
tavernier May 2018 #11
dlk May 2018 #12
riverbendviewgal May 2018 #14
DesertRat May 2018 #18
Bernardo de La Paz May 2018 #19
Gothmog May 2018 #21
VOX May 2018 #24

Response to kpete (Original post)

Sat May 12, 2018, 08:30 AM

1. K&R....

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Response to kpete (Original post)

Sat May 12, 2018, 08:32 AM

2. K&R...

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Response to kpete (Original post)

Sat May 12, 2018, 08:37 AM

3. Just because Kelly speaks more calmly

He still perpetuates the same bigoted arrogance his boss stands for. They are all totally despicable.

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Response to Ohiogal (Reply #3)

Sat May 12, 2018, 08:41 AM

4. K&R Absolutely Correct!!! n/t

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Response to kpete (Original post)

Sat May 12, 2018, 09:14 AM

5. Just wondering.

What is the solution to illegal immigration? This issue goes round and round in my brain with no real conclusions (as do lots of other ideas! 🧐. If I were in places like El Salvador, I’d be trying my best to get my kids out of there and to safety and a better life. Asylum works, but not for everyone, including impoverished Mexicans who just want to earn money for their families. And asylum is not a permanent guarantee, as witnessed by the deportation of Haitians granted asylum years ago. I think it is the responsibility of Congress to pass new immigration laws, but I don’t have clear ideas for what those laws should do. I definitely think a guest worker program would help, but how would that differ from programs like H2-B and H1-B? What rights would a guest worker program confer? For example, would they contribute to Social Security even though, as noncitizens, they cannot collect that money back. And, for that matter, why aren’t the H-1B and H-2B programs working well enough to prevent the deportations of Mexicans and others? DU has lots of really smart people—I’d love to hear your ideas for what we need to do because this problem is not going away.

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Response to Lonestarblue (Reply #5)

Sat May 12, 2018, 09:24 AM

6. I would like to see some thoughts here, too.

And, an equally important question is who will replace all these so-called illegal workers they're sending away? These are people working in harvesting of crops, cleaning hotels, working in meat processing plants, doing landscaping, building houses and replacing roofs, as well as providing a lot of the dirty work in many of our industrial plants.

Who's gonna fill their shoes?

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Response to KY_EnviroGuy (Reply #6)

Sat May 12, 2018, 11:03 AM

17. My husband is a TPS Honduran

He builds fences, welds and paints.

I did like this part. But, I'm not sure he will have any sway over this.

So you think all the TPS status should be canceled for all the countries?

I think we should fold all of the TPS people that have been here for a considerable period of time and find a way for them to be [on] a path to citizenship. Use the Haitians as an example.

A path to citizenship rather than sent home?

Yeah. Well, they were there in a legal status under TPS, that's a big deal. They're under legal status. You take the Central Americans that have been here 20-plus years. I mean if you really start looking at them and saying, "OK you know you've been here 20 years. What have you done with your life?" Well, I've met an American guy and I have three children and I've worked and gotten a degree or I'm a brick mason or something like that. That's what I think we should do — for the ones that have been here for shorter periods of time, the whatever it was that gave them TPS status in the first place. If that is solved back in their home countries they should go home.



My husband has been here 20 years. Probably 17 or 18 of them legally.

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Response to cannabis_flower (Reply #17)

Sat May 12, 2018, 02:06 PM

22. My family and I wish you well.

I truly hope this works out well for your husband. He deserves to stay where the life he has built is based.

I think most Americans are very ignorant about immigrants and immigration law, and a lot of politicians want it that way so they can control our thoughts and votes.

We should have a TV education program that would demonstrate how important folks like your family are to our society and economy and which illustrates the work they do every day.

........ ........

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Response to KY_EnviroGuy (Reply #22)

Wed May 16, 2018, 09:48 AM

25. I've seem a couple of encouraging articles

in the news lately. There was a protest in Honduras where demonstrators are suggesting that Honduras kick the US out of their base there.

https://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Hondurans-March-Against-US-Base-After-Trump-Termination-of-TPS-20180513-0006.html

Also, there is a lawsuit now in federal court.

http://lawyerscom.org/federal-lawsuit-against-trump-administration-challenges-tps-termination-for-hondurans/

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Response to Lonestarblue (Reply #5)

Sat May 12, 2018, 09:33 AM

8. the simple answer is to allow labor

to move as freely as capital or the flip side, restrict capital movement as labor is. but a simple answer has a host of obstacles. sorry, not much help.

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Response to Kurt V. (Reply #8)

Sat May 12, 2018, 12:50 PM

20. Good idea!

Your idea makes me think along the lines of the rights of people within the EU to move from one country to another to work. A system like there here could be structured differently—out of political necessity—so that people moving and working here would not become citizens. I think citizens of EU member states can vote in elections in their country of residence after a period of time, but they remain citizens of both the EU and their country of birth unless they apply for new citizenship. I’m sure people here would not support voting privileges, which may be okay. If the U.S. had labor treaties with Canada and Mexico, citizens could move in any direction for work, including U.S. citizens. I know this idea is way out there, but nothing else seems to be working other than throwing money and resources that could be better spent elsewhere at a never-ending problem.

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Response to Lonestarblue (Reply #5)

Sat May 12, 2018, 09:43 AM

10. Guest workers are ok, but what we need are future citizens...

Overall birth rates for US citizens have been below replacement rate for some time. Our relatively high level of undocumented immigration, however, masks the economic impact. Because of it, we don't feel the pinch of a shrinking workforce to the extent other countries have. We don't see shrinking consumer demand and tax revenue. What we need is an organized system to bring in a certain number of immigrants each year. And not just skilled workers. We need unskilled as well. We need people across the whole continuum. We need to legitimize what's been going on informally for decades. Undocumented immigrants are not a drain or nuisance, except in the warped minds of xenophobes and racists. They are vital to our economic survival. Do you think Germany, Canada et al. are doing similar simply out of the kindness of their hearts? Umm, no. So in years to come, when you become eligible for SS and Medicare, thank an immigrant. They have just as much impact on the viability of those essential programs as home grown citizens.

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Response to paleotn (Reply #10)

Sat May 12, 2018, 10:42 AM

16. +1 (nt)

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Response to paleotn (Reply #10)

Sat May 12, 2018, 06:36 PM

23. Terrific points and extremely important.

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Response to kpete (Original post)

Sat May 12, 2018, 09:25 AM

7. Ah General,

on behalf of my ancestors who arrived in this country with only farming and mechanic skills who couldn't speak English (probably a lot of them couldn't read or write), many times carried all that they own in a bag. They dug in, worked their asses off, made sure their children were educated, at least one often more joined the armed forces in every major war from the Revolution to Vietnam, learn to be master mechanics, master electricians, civil engineers, pastors, intell operatives, musicians, writers, etc. They paid back this country with interest for giving them a chance. They also stepped up for civil rights, unions and conservation; you know the things that idiot you pimp for spits on. Yeah, they had their share of dirt bags; every family does. However, all up they gave much more than they took.

So sir, with all due disrespect and in their memory, go fuck yourself.

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Response to sarge43 (Reply #7)

Sat May 12, 2018, 09:51 AM

13. My paternal grandparents came from Sicily. Grandpa worked in the mines as a child and teenager.

Grandma was 14 when they married, and she had nine kids. A tenth, her firstborn, was a stillbirth.

My father was a 19-year-old airmen at Pearl Harbor when it was bombed.

When he joined the Air Force, he changed his first and middle names from Salvatore Giovanni to Samuel John, because Italy was on the opposite side in that war, and he knew he would be subjected to prejudice with such an Italian name.

All of his brothers also joined the military, as did my two brothers and my oldest sister (who is a nurse).

All of those rural immigrants' children and grandchildren have become contributors to this country, not a burden of any sort.

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Response to tblue37 (Reply #13)

Sat May 12, 2018, 10:16 AM

15. Hear you and hand salute to your father.

My husband pointed out that his Ukrainian grandparents met all of Kelly's talking points. They ran a farm that fed god knows how many people. Their four sons signed up right after Pearl Harbor. One was a Pathfinder in the 101st, the men that airdropped into France behind German lines the night before D-Day. Somehow he made it out alive.

Again, sit on it and spin, General

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Response to kpete (Original post)

Sat May 12, 2018, 09:42 AM

9. Kick and recommend for visibility of the evil Gen Kelly

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Response to kpete (Original post)

Sat May 12, 2018, 09:44 AM

11. Kelly? Hmmm... Apache? Algonquin? Cherokee?

Didn’t think so. You can leave now.

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Response to kpete (Original post)

Sat May 12, 2018, 09:44 AM

12. Sadism Takes Many Forms -- This is One of Them

It's difficult to imagine how any human being could have such a dark, twisted soul--but there you are.

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Response to kpete (Original post)

Sat May 12, 2018, 10:10 AM

14. My grandparents came from Poland

In the very early 1900s in their teens. I was born in a small town in NJ after WWII. My grandparents spoke mostly Polish. I walked down the street in my town and was called a DP. I thought it meant dopey Polack.

During Prohibition my grandparents made whiskey and kolbassa. My grandfather saved his money and bought land. Enough to give each of his 8 kids land to build a house. He worked everyday to the day he died in his 80s. When he retired from Hercules, He had to still work for his mental health and so he worked as a school crossing guard in the winter and in the parks department cutting grass and trees in the summer. My grandfather inspired me with his work ethnic.

I loved NYC growing up. I moved to Toronto when I was 21. I love it's diversity.

I hate Trump and Rob Ford. I love immigrants.

Obama is the greatest president in my lifetime imo. Justine Trudeau and his father are my favorite Prime Ministers.

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Response to kpete (Original post)

Sat May 12, 2018, 11:14 AM

18. John Kelly's genealogy





Deep dive tk, but here is the 1910 census showing Kelly's great-grandfather Giuseppe Pedalino and his second wife Concetta. (Kelly's great-grandma died in 1898.)

He was a wagon driver.
She was illiterate and could not speak English 10 years after arrival.#resistancegenealogy
Here's John Kelly's maternal grandmother Teresa as a child in the 1900 census.

Her father, a day laborer named John DeMarco had been here for 18 years.
He had not become a citizen.
He could not read, write, or speak English.#resistancegenealogy


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Response to kpete (Original post)

Sat May 12, 2018, 11:47 AM

19. English in US didnt like Irish/Germans didnt like Chinese didnt like Hispanics didnt like Muslims


Each successive group does not like the next group of newcomers and seeks to block them and future groups by closing the door completely.

Native Americans in all parts of North America did not like being invaded by the English, French, and Spanish.

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Response to kpete (Original post)

Sat May 12, 2018, 01:05 PM

21. Kelly's own family history hurts his case

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Response to kpete (Original post)

Sat May 12, 2018, 07:35 PM

24. "They're not people that would easily assimilate into the United States into our modern society."

“They're overwhelmingly rural people in the countries they come from – fourth, fifth, sixth grade educations are kind of the norm. They don't speak English, obviously that's a big thing. They don't speak English. They don't integrate well, they don't have skills.”
- - - - - -
Seems like Gen. Kelly is confused in his thinking— because these blunt thoughts honestly and accurately describe the average Trump voter.

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