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Sun May 6, 2018, 02:33 PM

What's a wypipo? The problem with wypipo is

that "pipo" rhymes with "typo," so it's confusing for some slow people like me. We read it and we go, "huh? Wy - pie - po?" What's that?

The meaning would be clearer if it were spelled "wypeepo," with an accent on the first syllable.

But I assume some people might object to that, too.

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Arrow 11 replies Author Time Post
Reply What's a wypipo? The problem with wypipo is (Original post)
pnwmom May 2018 OP
BeyondGeography May 2018 #1
pangaia May 2018 #2
Ms. Toad May 2018 #3
pnwmom May 2018 #5
BumRushDaShow May 2018 #4
CurtEastPoint May 2018 #6
BumRushDaShow May 2018 #8
pnwmom May 2018 #7
BumRushDaShow May 2018 #9
pnwmom May 2018 #10
BumRushDaShow May 2018 #11

Response to pnwmom (Original post)

Sun May 6, 2018, 02:35 PM

1. It reads exactly like Cantonese-accented English

I see wypipo in tha beeuding.

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Response to pnwmom (Original post)

Sun May 6, 2018, 02:39 PM

2. Wypipo would be pronounced "whypeepo almost anywhere except in the usa.

i = ee

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Response to pnwmom (Original post)

Sun May 6, 2018, 02:39 PM

3. It would not have occurred to me to pronounce it with a long i sound. n/t

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Response to Ms. Toad (Reply #3)

Sun May 6, 2018, 02:47 PM

5. Like I said, I'm slow. In my head, the second syllable was pronounced

like the first syllable in "piper."

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Response to pnwmom (Original post)

Sun May 6, 2018, 02:46 PM

4. "pipo" rhymes with "typo,"

But "typo" has a "y" that gives it a long "i" sound.

"pipo" uses an "i" that can sound like a short "i" as in "pip" (or "hip" or "tip" or "lip" or "sip" or "nip" ).

I.e., "wy-pip-o" or "wy-pi'-po". It's more where the syllables are formed.

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Reply #4)

Sun May 6, 2018, 02:49 PM

6. I read someone say they use "Y. P. Pull"

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Response to CurtEastPoint (Reply #6)

Sun May 6, 2018, 02:57 PM

8. In the original article that started the other thread

the author mentioned that version. But I would suppose for the thumb-texters, trying to insert that punctuation in there would be a PITA!

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Reply #4)

Sun May 6, 2018, 02:55 PM

7. Piper, piler, piner -- all are words using a long i sound. n/t

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Response to pnwmom (Reply #7)

Sun May 6, 2018, 02:58 PM

9. Yes since they all have that "e" in there

vs the "o".

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Reply #9)

Sun May 6, 2018, 03:03 PM

10. Except all the words you mentioned

"hip" or "tip" or "lip" or "sip" or "nip"

Would only be pronounced with the short I if the subsequent consonant was repeated twice.

As in: hipper, tipper, sipper, and nipper.

The double consonant is the signal to pronounce the previous syllable with a short vowel.

So, I suppose an alternative could be:

Wypippo.

That would work for me.





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Response to pnwmom (Reply #10)

Sun May 6, 2018, 03:13 PM

11. Or

the other example I gave - "wy-pi'-po'".

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