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Tue Feb 13, 2018, 08:11 AM

"The Anglo-American heritage of law enforcement"

The Hoarse Whisperer @HoarseWisperer 6:54 AM - Feb 13, 2018

“The Anglo-American heritage of law enforcement” is a long way of saying “oppression of people of color by European whites”.




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Reply "The Anglo-American heritage of law enforcement" (Original post)
fleur-de-lisa Feb 13 OP
Amishman Feb 13 #1
TheyAreDeplorble Feb 13 #2
LanternWaste Feb 13 #3

Response to fleur-de-lisa (Original post)

Tue Feb 13, 2018, 08:47 AM

1. Not sure this is really racist

Reading the explanations on sheriff's and the US legal system's ties to British Common law, and it actually makes sense.

Maybe a poor choice of words because of how it can be misconstrued, but in this instance I think people are overreacting. Reading the proceeding and following parts of the speech, the context seems to support the explanation.

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Response to Amishman (Reply #1)

Tue Feb 13, 2018, 09:43 AM

2. Consider the fucking source. "Off script" ALWAYS reveals their true thoughts. And Occam's razor

 

clearly points to the simplest explanation - that being the inherent racism and bigotry of conservatives.

If it talks like a duck, etc., it's a fucking duck.

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Response to Amishman (Reply #1)

Tue Feb 13, 2018, 09:51 AM

3. The most effective dog whistles are sung to the tune of a semi-history

The most effective dog whistles are sung to the tune of a semi-history, a history that ends when it becomes too complex for a simple narrative.

The position of sheriff shares a common name with the English, but it (as well as the English reeve) is predicated on older magisterial potions (e.g. the Persian Empire had officials which shared in all but name only, the same responsibilities-- that of enforcing the crown's will on a local scale.

It's as though people are saying we share a common heritage derived from the invention of the wheel with the British. The wheel had been around much longer, and we have the wheel in common with much of the world, rather than limiting it to the country which first Anglicized the name to what we now refer to it as.

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