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joshcryer

Profile Information

Name: Josh Cryer
Gender: Male
Hometown: Colorado
Member since: 2002
Number of posts: 48,496

Journal Archives

I think it's OK to try something and fail, than to do nothing.

There are many failures, many, one may argue even most. Humans are infallible. If you don't try to do good, you are crap. I have failed so many fucking times in life trying to help people out. From trying to fix someones car and making it worse to giving someone rent money only for them to spend it on something else and get evicted anyway.

No one can expect full infallibility, but it is completely heartless to advocate doing nothing, even in the face of potential failure or even blowback.

I have a very relevant anecdote. I steam cleaned my brothers house tonight, the carpet reeked of dog piss from the dog they had. I got about 80% of it out but after 6 hours I gave up. Urine is impossibly difficult to remove from carpet. I fucking failed. But why not spend my time doing something I know how to do (and did professionally at one point)? Because of the potential for failure? Fuck no, you do what you think is right, I saved him hundreds of dollars, it'll smell a lot nicer in a day or two, once things dry.

Yeah, OK, that's not comparable to Presidential level decisions. But Presidents get it wrong, too, and I frankly don't see "do nothing" as an excuse to "don't be wrong." Because, you know what? People like you would say the President was wrong if it really went wrong. Say the entire Kurdish population was wiped out. You wouldn't bat an eye to criticize the President then. And if you did? If you didn't give a fuck if the entire Kurdish population was wiped out? I have no reason to respect your moral or ethical judgement. None.

I miss RainDog.

Yeah, I'm sad about Robin Williams, too, but RainDog was my friend, I didn't know them very much but on DU we both spent a lot of time talking about marijuana legalization. They were my friend. I only have a few here who really agree with me on important issues. It's just sad, and I miss them, and I hope, hope, things get better on that issues we both most agreed upon. If only in their memory.

Sorry for the sad post, if you take it that way, but me and RainDog, we really spread the message (just google me and RainDog, we were on top of it). I like to think RainDog was instrumental on my activist efforts to get it legalized in Colorado. I hope they knew that, because I never told them how much they meant to me and how they influenced me. They did it. I worked a lot to get it legalized in 2012, and I don't know if I would have were it not for RainDog's posts here. They gave me hope.

RIP RainDog, my friend, and influence. We had spats on other issues but this was one issue we really connected.

Not really.

My beef is that we're attacking the symptom as opposed to the cause.

And when Democrats do talk about attacking the cause (in one case it's the corporate tax rate which has way too many loopholes) it's sort of ignored or deflected. Democrats say "we need to close the loopholes and lower the rate," everyone focuses on "lowering the rate." Why? The high end is higher than Germany. So why not adjust it down to Germany's rate, and then close the loopholes? It's a win win.

Now you'd call be a pragmatist for saying that, I think it's just common darn sense.

Additionally, give tax incentives to companies which do keep their manufacturing here and who do hire American employees.

Of course, that wouldn't stop something like TPP from being created, but it could probably be made public at that point, because it wouldn't have the kind of economic subterfuge that is necessary to maintain our import economy while at the same time marginalizing our biggest global threats (China and Russia). Slave manufactured goods and oil are unsustainable, and the US knows it.

Automation is going to take over slave labor and renewables are going to take over oil. The question is whether we get off the import economy before it happens or if we strangle the rest of the world while we do it. It appears that we are doing the latter. And the latter will take a lot longer because it means letting the almighty "markets" bring forth renewable energy and automation as opposed to a grand bargain which could bring it about decades sooner.

Lest I ramble on further about how a living wage is going to be absolutely necessary in this new world.

Here's his missive on unions:

http://www.businessinsider.com/teslas-elon-musk-no-need-for-unions-just-fire-the-assholes-2009-6

Dude is seriously out of touch, but I think he comes from an uber-capitalist background.

We agree on many things, he believes in climate change, as do I. He believes the US rocket industry is contained by pork / cost-plus / crony contracts, as do I.

But his views as unions as a "two class system" is shit, especially since he, of all people, has advocated 95% in house manufacturing. I might be able to buy his argument if much else was developed outside of the factory, but he owns or controls 95% of production, thus, to me, a union in his company would be the best thing to happen.

Still, again, he justifies his shitty position by pointing out that he pays way more than anyone else, and it's why he retains so many workers, they get paid. Go to ULA, do the same amount of work, you're not getting paid nearly as much, no question.

It's all true, of course, but applied wrong. Think of "sonder."

Sonder n. the realization that each random passerby is living a life as vivid and complex as your own—populated with their own ambitions, friends, routines, worries and inherited craziness—an epic story that continues invisibly around you like an anthill sprawling deep underground, with elaborate passageways to thousands of other lives that you’ll never know existed, in which you might appear only once, as an extra sipping coffee in the background, as a blur of traffic passing on the highway, as a lighted window at dusk.


How can we possibly think that an interconnected world such as ours with all of its glorious industrial magic, stuff so beyond each one of us but applied through the efforts of many, is anything but a truly connected and truly integrated society?

The whole alienation thing only applies to someone from a pre-industrial society watching as industry comes up around them and trying to make sense of it all. The reality is that we as a species are probably more social, more connected, less alienated than any other species on the planet.

Also, to get back to what you were saying, that (buying what we use, buying what we thinkg) is actually one of the critiques of Marx's theory of alienation and commodity fetishism. What if Marxism itself becomes a commodity fetish to the point of alienating others. Think about that one for a bit (yeah, once a philosophy becomes a caricature of its critique it sort of invalidates itself).

If Biden runs he'll run on infrastructure.

Joe Biden on LaGuardia Airport: 'I must be in some third-world country'
Vice President Joe Biden is very unhappy about America's declining infrastructure. During a speech in Philadelphia today, he threw New York's LaGuardia Airport under the bus to drive that point home. But first, the vice president talked about advancements overseas. "If I blindfolded someone and took him at 2 o'clock in the morning into the airport in Hong Kong and said, 'Where do you think you are?’ He’d say, ‘This must be America. It’s a modern airport,'" Biden said. International airports have indeed seen some stunning innovations recently.

"If I took you and blindfolded you and took you to LaGuardia Airport in New York, you'd think, ‘I must be in some third-world country,’" Biden said. When his statement drew laughter from the crowd, Biden quickly noted, "I'm not joking." To further illustrate just how bad things have become, he pointed to statistics from the World Economic Forum. "Just in the last decade, the United States has fallen 20 spots when it comes to the quality of infrastructure," Biden said. "It's embarrassing, and it's stupid. It's stupid."

"That puts us literally behind, they rank us behind Barbados," Biden said. "Great country. One airport." Biden's remarks came during the unveiling of Amtrak's newest rail engine. "Why did we lead the world economically for so long? We had the most modern infrastructure in the world," he said. Despite being one of the most popular airports in the world, LaGuardia is often criticized by travelers for its dated or "unique" facilities.


It's going to be good. Video at link, btw, he shows his passion.

it will be Hillary

It's inevitable

Wait two years.

I will be proven correct.

You don't have to like it. I predict now it will be Clinton-Castro.

Bookmark this for future soothsaying. It is early. You can chastise me for predicting early. We got 2014 to focus on. All well and good, I am making this prediction now because I want to call it early.

Clinton cannot shore up liberals and it risks causing a rift between liberals, and centrists and third wayers (DINOS). The problem is with the independent vote. Clinton can get the independent vote fairly easily and a lot of the conservative women vote (if only voting because they identify with Clinton). However, the independent vote requires liberal activists to GOTV and rile up the base, as liberals have always done.

To satisfy the liberal vote Clinton needs a true liberal on the ticket. Castro shores up the Latino vote, again for identifying purposes, but it doesn't go far enough to cause a massive GOTV effort. In Latino communities that will be the case, but in more conservative communities the liberal GOTV effort will be paramount. And for that reason Clinton will need someone more progressive on the ticket.

Castro will accept because he suspects by 2024 he will be a shoe in for President as the Latino community will have grown to be 15-20% of the population. And his progressivism will be accepted in 2016 and 2024 the country will have shifted dramatically to the left (by then marijuana and gay marriage will be legalized across the country; and the American public will be wanting Single Payer which is what his platform will run on).



Some will say Clinton wouldn't need Castro or that Castro wouldn't jump on board a Clinton ticket because she is too centrist / right wing / third way. I think that Castro would be on the ticket because he wants to change America and being VP and then President is his best shot at that. The demographics of the United States are statistically going one way.

If climate change doesn't screw us in the intrim this is how I see the future panning out.

Chastise away.

edit: TBF first posed this situation though I don't think she outright predicted it (she did make convincing arguments for this, however). Credit goes to TBF for convincing me on this issue though I am fully compelled to believe this will be the candidacy. It's been in the back of my mind for weeks now and I finally committed to making a prediction this early.

204 has nothing to do with capitalism, though, it's automation.

Automation is causing such a worker disparity, and it's only going to get worse. Look at how, a recent example for strikers, McDonalds is already extremely automated as it is.

My problem starts from an anti-capitalist POV, except, one that recognizes capitalist 'success':









I fear a world ran by corporations that "works." And that happens if we allow ourselves to operate within the confines of the political system that is incidentally ran by the very corporations. No where does he challenge us to uproot the political system, only in 220 does he challenge us to "not be swayed like mobs" to the powers that be. That's literally what the statistics show us doing. So when someone comes out, this day and age, and says "we must reduce poverty," and we're on a trajectory to reduce it anyway in 10-15 years, it comes off as not really a true commitment to anything. It's something already happening. The "anti-stuff" message is just delaying the expectation of urgency and it serves, in my view, as only a propagandistic effect to chill people from wanting a better standard of living (and therefore challenging the status quo) because there is no virtue in that.

Francis has, of course, elsewhere, decried the effect of the "business lobby" but we'd be remiss to ignore his mentioning of the "gay lobby" and the "Masonic lobby..." naturally. Because those are lobby's we need to concern ourselves with.
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