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friendly_iconoclast

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Member since: Fri Sep 8, 2006, 12:47 PM
Number of posts: 10,329

Journal Archives

Source Leaks Secret Guidelines for US Government "Watchlist"

Also posted in the Civil Liberties group:
http://www.democraticunderground.com/1168853

http://www.commondreams.org/news/2014/07/23/source-leaks-secret-guidelines-us-government-watchlist

Published on Wednesday, July 23, 2014
by Common Dreams
Source Leaks Secret Guidelines for US Government "Watchlist"

Reporting by The Intercept reveals that individuals placed on government "watchlist" based on "reasonable suspicion"

by Lauren McCauley, staff writer


“A source within the intelligence community” has leaked the government’s secret guidebook to how it adds names to and manages its controversial terrorist “watchlist” and was published in full by The Intercept on Wednesday.

Reported by Jeremy Scahill and Ryan Devereaux, the 166-page document (pdf) issued by the National Counterterrorism Center—and titled “March 2013 Watchlisting Guidance”—details the most up-to-date government rules for placing individuals on their main terrorism database, as well as the no-fly list and selectee list. It was developed by representatives from the nation's top military and intelligence bodies including the Pentagon, CIA, NSA, and FBI.

According to the report, in 2013 the Obama administration “quietly approved a substantial expansion” of the watchlist system, “authorizing a secret process that requires neither ‘concrete facts’ nor ‘irrefutable evidence’ to designate an American or foreigner as a terrorist.” It was developed behind closed doors by representatives of the nation’s intelligence, military, and law-enforcement establishment, including the Pentagon, CIA, NSA, and FBI.

Scahill and Devereaux report that the guidelines permit “the elastic concept of 'reasonable suspicion' as a standard for determining whether someone is a possible threat.”


The .pdf file is available at:

https://s3.amazonaws.com/s3.documentcloud.org/documents/1227228/2013-watchlist-guidance.pdf


The Feds seem to think Orwell was writing a manual for governance. Wonder what
DU's own cult of personality will have say about this?
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Thu Jul 24, 2014, 05:38 PM (6 replies)

Source Leaks Secret Guidelines for US Government "Watchlist"

http://www.commondreams.org/news/2014/07/23/source-leaks-secret-guidelines-us-government-watchlist

Published on Wednesday, July 23, 2014
by Common Dreams
Source Leaks Secret Guidelines for US Government "Watchlist"

Reporting by The Intercept reveals that individuals placed on government "watchlist" based on "reasonable suspicion"

by Lauren McCauley, staff writer


“A source within the intelligence community” has leaked the government’s secret guidebook to how it adds names to and manages its controversial terrorist “watchlist” and was published in full by The Intercept on Wednesday.

Reported by Jeremy Scahill and Ryan Devereaux, the 166-page document (pdf) issued by the National Counterterrorism Center—and titled “March 2013 Watchlisting Guidance”—details the most up-to-date government rules for placing individuals on their main terrorism database, as well as the no-fly list and selectee list. It was developed by representatives from the nation's top military and intelligence bodies including the Pentagon, CIA, NSA, and FBI.

According to the report, in 2013 the Obama administration “quietly approved a substantial expansion” of the watchlist system, “authorizing a secret process that requires neither ‘concrete facts’ nor ‘irrefutable evidence’ to designate an American or foreigner as a terrorist.” It was developed behind closed doors by representatives of the nation’s intelligence, military, and law-enforcement establishment, including the Pentagon, CIA, NSA, and FBI.

Scahill and Devereaux report that the guidelines permit “the elastic concept of 'reasonable suspicion' as a standard for determining whether someone is a possible threat.”


The .pdf file is available at:

https://s3.amazonaws.com/s3.documentcloud.org/documents/1227228/2013-watchlist-guidance.pdf


The Feds seem to think Orwell was writing a manual for governance...
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Thu Jul 24, 2014, 05:31 PM (1 replies)

WaPo: Beretta to move manufacturing jobs out of Maryland, blames state gun laws

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/beretta-to-move-manufacturing-jobs-out-of-maryland-blames-gun-laws/2014/07/22/4e91665e-11eb-11e4-8936-26932bcfd6ed_story.html


Beretta to move manufacturing jobs out of Maryland, blames state gun laws


By Michael S. Rosenwald July 22

Blaming Maryland’s new gun-control laws, Beretta USA said Tuesday that it is relocating its manufacturing operations from Accokeek to Tennessee, a move that will eliminate about 160 jobs in southern Prince George’s County.

The Italian company had disclosed a $45 million plan this year to expand operations to a new factory near Nashville. But Beretta has decided to go beyond that plan because, a senior executive said, the company is “very worried about the wisdom of maintaining a firearm manufacturing factory” in Maryland.

Maryland’s new gun restrictions, pushed by Gov. Martin O’Malley (D) after the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown, Conn., bans 45 types of assault rifles and put in place tough fingerprint, photo identification and training requirements. Magazines are limited to 10 rounds.

A version of the legislation that passed the state Senate “would have prohibited Beretta ­USA from being able to manufacture, store or even import into the State products that we sell to customers throughout the United States and around the world,” the company said.


My prediction: Gun control advocates will downplay (or avoid discussing altogether)
the economic impact of this move by Beretta, while simultaneously doing nothing
about replacing the lost jobs and tax revenue.

Wonder if Marty O'Malley expects any help from that nice Mr. Bloomberg to
help with the financial impact of this. If so, he'll be sorely disappointed...
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Thu Jul 24, 2014, 03:27 AM (23 replies)

Attempt to broaden "may-issue" gets it in the slats in Massachusetts

http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2014/07/17/state-senate-begins-debating-anti-gun-violence-bill/6VnoPwQ5iXb8LRygiqVk0J/story.html


Senators pass an altered gun bill
House provision loses to gun groups


By Joshua Miller
| Globe Staff July 17, 2014

Under pressure from gun rights groups including the National Rifle Association, state senators Thursday rejected a provision aimed at keeping rifles and shotguns out of the hands of dangerous people before approving a broad bill meant to reduce firearm violence.

The provision, which was included in the House version of the legislation that passed last week and the Senate bill that was debated Thursday, would give police chiefs discretion to deny issuing permits for shotguns and rifles to those they deem unsuitable...

...State Senator James E. Timilty, Democrat of Walpole, defended the change, which passed by a vote of 28-10.

He said he was concerned that the provision might violate the US Constitution’s Second Amendment and could have landed the antigun violence measure in court. “I think a suit would have followed,” said Timilty, Senate chairman of the Joint Committee on Public Safety and Homeland Security...


Naturally enough, the usual crowd of prohibitionists have a sad, which is too bad
as the bill has a few good elements previously discussed here:

http://www.democraticunderground.com/1172149134
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Sat Jul 19, 2014, 03:02 PM (4 replies)

NSA targets Linux Journal as 'extremist forum': Report

Source: ZDNet


Summary: The NSA is targeting the Linux Journal as an "extremist forum" and flagging its readers as 'extremists', according to source code leaked to German public broadcaster, ARD.

By Leon Spencer | July 4, 2014 -- 02:00 GMT (19:00 PDT)

The Linux Journal, a Linux user community website, has been flagged as an "extremist forum" by the United States' National Security Agency (NSA), while its users have been flagged as "extremists" under the agency's XKeyscore program, according to leaked source code.

The source code, which was published this week by German public broadcaster, ARD, also identified at least two German Tor Directory Authority servers — one in Berlin, the other in Nuremberg — as being under surveillance by the NSA...

...ARD said the XKeyscore rules also show that the NSA tracks all connections to a server hosting part of an anonymous email service at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in the US, while also reporting details about visits to the Linux Journal — which it also calls "extremist".

Read more: http://www.zdnet.com/nsa-targets-linux-journal-as-extremist-forum-report-7000031241/



A link to the original report from ARD (in English)

http://daserste.ndr.de/panorama/aktuell/nsa230_page-1.html
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Thu Jul 3, 2014, 10:46 PM (66 replies)

If you're going to appeal to authority in your fight against guns...

...to wit, Warren Burger (the first link is merely the latest example of same):

"Chief Justice Warren Burger on the 2nd Amendment"

http://www.democraticunderground.com/12626815

as well as:

http://www.democraticunderground.com/10022147913

http://www.democraticunderground.com/1172146191

http://www.democraticunderground.com/1172137826

...do you accept their authority on other issues as well?

Bowers v Hardwick


http://www.law.cornell.edu/supremecourt/text/478/186#writing-USSC_CR_0478_0186_ZC

Concurrence

BURGER, C.J., Concurring Opinion

CHIEF JUSTICE BURGER, concurring.

I join the Court's opinion, but I write separately to underscore my view that, in constitutional terms, there is no such thing as a fundamental right to commit homosexual sodomy.

As the Court notes, ante at 192, the proscriptions against sodomy have very "ancient roots." Decisions of individuals relating to homosexual conduct have been subject to state intervention throughout the history of Western civilization. Condemnation of those practices is firmly rooted in Judeo-Christian moral and ethical standards. Homosexual sodomy was a capital crime under Roman law. See Code Theod. 9.7.6; Code Just. 9.9.31. See also D. Bailey, Homosexuality and the Western Christian Tradition 70-81 (1975). During the English Reformation, when powers of the ecclesiastical courts were transferred to the King's Courts, the first English statute criminalizing sodomy was passed. 25 Hen. VIII, ch. 6. Blackstone described "the infamous crime against nature" as an offense of "deeper malignity" than rape, a heinous act "the very mention of which is a disgrace to human nature," and "a crime not fit to be named." 4 W. Blackstone, Commentaries *215. The common law of England, including its prohibition of sodomy, became the received law of Georgia and the other Colonies. In 1816, the Georgia Legislature passed the statute at issue here, and that statute has been continuously in force in one form or another since that time. To hold that the act of homosexual sodomy is somehow protected as a fundamental right would be to cast aside millennia of moral teaching.

This is essentially not a question of personal "preferences," but rather of the legislative authority of the State. I find nothing in the Constitution depriving a State of the power to enact the statute challenged here.


Automatically proclaiming the validity of an opinion because Someone Important
Said It is intellectually lazy, morally bankrupt, or both. I leave it to the reader to
determine which of these apply in the linked threads...





Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Sun Jun 22, 2014, 06:56 PM (13 replies)

Internal Police Emails Show Efforts to Hide Use of Cell Phone Tracking

Source: ACLU

Internal Police Emails Show Efforts to Hide Use of Cell Phone Tracking
06/19/2014

By Maria Kayanan, Associate Legal Director, ACLU of Florida at 9:01pm

As we suspected, local law enforcement officials are borrowing cell phone tracking devices known as “stingrays” from the U.S. Marshals Service – and police are deliberately concealing the use of stingrays in court documents submitted to judges in criminal investigations.

The ACLU of Florida is releasing a set of internal police emails obtained through a public records request with the subject line “Trap and Trace Confidentiality”. The documents confirm that local police, working on state court matters, hide behind the sham cloak of the U.S. Marshals’ office to keep the information about stingray use out of court files – and beyond even a court’s custody and reach.

In the email exchange, a Sarasota Police Department sergeant says that in warrant application to a judge, a North Port Police Department detective had “specifically outlined the investigative means used to locate the suspect,” and the sergeant asked that the detective “submit a new PCA and seal the old one.” In other words, fix the old affidavit and keep the use of the stingray equipment secret.

The sergeant also says, “In the past, and at the request of the U.S. Marshalls , the investigative means utilized to locate the suspect have not been revealed so that we may continue to utilize this technology without the knowledge of the criminal element. In reports or depositions we simply refer to the assistance as ‘received information from a confidential source regarding the location of the suspect.’ To date this has not been challenged…”

Read more: https://www.aclu.org/blog/national-security-technology-and-liberty/internal-police-emails-show-efforts-hide-use-cell



Remember, citizen: It's better for society that you don't know what surveillance
techniques are being used by law enforcement. Fourth Amendment? HA!

(from the link in the above excerpt)

https://www.aclu.org/sites/default/files/assets/aclu_florida_stingray_police_emails.pdf

I just received a phone call from one of our detectives (Tom Laughlin) who is assigned to the U.S.
Marshalls Task Force out of Tampa. He received a call from the ASA Craig Schaefer regarding some
concerns. Schaefer advised him that they received a PCA regarding a NorthPortPD Case 09-031066
in where the detective specifically outlined the investigative means used to locate the suspect. As you are aware for some time now, the US Marshalls and I believe FDLE have had equipment which enables law enforcement to ping a suspects cell phone and pin point his/her exact location in an effort to apprehend suspects involved in serious crimes. In the past, and at the request of the U.S. Marshalls, the investigative means utilized to locate the suspect have not been revealed so that we may continue to utilize this technology without the knowledge of the criminal element. In reports or depositions we simply refer to the assistance as " received information from a confidential source regarding the location of the suspect." To date this has not been challenged, since it is not an integral part of the actual crime that occurred.

The ASA was not sure what agency your Detective Sinehth used that had the equipment that enabled him/her to locate his suspect. They were concerned as we all are, that by providing these specifics on a PCA, could jeopardize future investigations attempting to locate fugitives. The Tampa Office of the US Marshalls was not involved in the case, and they are not aware of who was. If this is in fact one of your cases, could you please entertain either having the Detective submit a new PCA and seal the old one, or at minimum instruct the detectives for future cases, regarding the fact that it is unnecessary to provide investigative means to anyone outside of law enforcement , especially in a public document. Please note that I am passing information on to you, and I have not been able to confirm that the case or detective are affiliated with NPPD


"Most open...", my ass!
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Fri Jun 20, 2014, 01:52 AM (9 replies)

The peril of hipster economics

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2014/05/peril-hipster-economics-2014527105521158885.html

The peril of hipster economics
When urban decay becomes a set piece to be remodelled or romanticised.

Last updated: 28 May 2014 08:03
Sarah Kendzior

On May 16, an artist, a railway service and a government agency spent $291,978 to block poverty from the public eye.

Called psychylustro, German artist Katharina Grosse's project is a large-scale work designed to distract Amtrak train riders from the dilapidated buildings and fallen factories of north Philadelphia. The city has a 28 percent poverty rate - the highest of any major US city - with much of it concentrated in the north. In some north Philadelphia elementary schools, nearly every child is living below the poverty line.

Grosse partnered with the National Endowment of the Arts and Amtrak to mask North Philadelphia's hardship with a delightful view. The Wall Street Journal calls this "Fighting Urban Blight With Art". Liz Thomas, the curator of the project, calls it "an experience that asks people to think about this space that they hurtle through every day".

The project is not actually fighting blight, of course - only the ability of Amtrak customers to see it...


Aaargh...
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Thu Jun 12, 2014, 11:49 PM (0 replies)

It's already been held to be a *bad* thing, if true, on this thread:

Bad for 'progress' on guns, dontcha know...

I'll repost the decidedly malodorous post in full, on the slim chance the poster regains a
residual sense of shame and self-deletes or edits it (the particularly repellent bit
is highlighted):

http://www.democraticunderground.com/10025067601#post7

Response to pnwmom (Original post)

Schema Thing (9,226 posts) Sun Jun 8, 2014, 11:12 PM
7. Your conclusion does not follow from the paragraphs you quoted

It's possible, but definitely not inferred by the text. Almost the opposite is inferred, ie: a citizen may have shot and injured one of the two bad guys. I hope not, because that is the last thing we need to make progress wrt guns, but hope does not change the text quoted above.
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Mon Jun 9, 2014, 12:55 AM (1 replies)

U.S. Marshals Seize Cops’ Spying Records to Keep Them From the ACLU

More transperancy...

http://www.wired.com/2014/06/feds-seize-stingray-documents/


U.S. Marshals Seize Cops’ Spying Records to Keep Them From the ACLU

By Kim Zetter
06.03.14 | 6:15 pm

A routine request in Florida for public records regarding the use of a surveillance tool known as stingray took an extraordinary turn recently when federal authorities seized the documents before police could release them.

The surprise move by the U.S. Marshals Service stunned the American Civil Liberties Union, which earlier this year filed the public records request with the Sarasota, Florida, police department for information detailing its use of the controversial surveillance tool.

The ACLU had an appointment last Tuesday to review documents pertaining to a case investigated by a Sarasota police detective. But marshals swooped in at the last minute to grab the records, claiming they belong to the U.S. Marshals Service and barring the police from releasing them.

ACLU staff attorney Nathan Freed Wessler called the move “truly extraordinary and beyond the worst transparency violations” the group has seen regarding documents detailing police use of the technology.


The original post from the ACLU:

https://www.aclu.org/blog/national-security-technology-and-liberty/us-marshals-seize-local-cops-cell-phone-tracking-files

U.S. Marshals Seize Local Cops’ Cell Phone Tracking Files in Extraordinary Attempt to Keep Information From Public
06/03/2014

Government Secrecy
By Nathan Freed Wessler, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy & Technology Project at 12:13pm

...RED FLAG #1: The Sarasota Police initially told us that they had responsive records, including applications filed by and orders issued to a local detective under the state “trap and trace” statute that he had relied on for authorization to conduct stingray surveillance. That raised the first red flag, since trap and trace orders are typically used to gather limited information about the phone numbers of incoming calls, not to track cell phones inside private spaces or conduct dragnet surveillance. And, such orders require a very low legal standard. As one federal magistrate judge has held, police should be permitted to use stingrays only after obtaining a probable cause warrant, if at all.

RED FLAG #2: The Sarasota Police set up an appointment for us to inspect the applications and orders, as required by Florida law. But a few hours before that appointment, an assistant city attorney sent an email cancelling the meeting on the basis that the U.S. Marshals Service was claiming the records as their own and instructing the local cops not to release them. Their explanation: the Marshals Service had deputized the local officer, and therefore the records were actually the property of the federal government.

We emphatically disagree, since the Sarasota detective created the applications, brought them to court, and retained the applications and orders in his files. Merely giving him a second title (“Special Deputy U.S. Marshal”) does not change these facts. But regardless, once the Sarasota Police Department received our records request, state law required them to hold onto the records for at least 30 days, to give us an opportunity to go to court and seek an order for release of the documents.

Instead of complying with that clear legal obligation, the local police allowed the records to disappear by letting the U.S. Marshals drive down from their office in Tampa, seize the physical files, and move them to an unknown location. We’ve seen our fair share of federal government attempts to keep records about stingrays secret, but we’ve never seen an actual physical raid on state records in order to conceal them from public view.
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Thu Jun 5, 2014, 01:59 PM (0 replies)
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