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TBF

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Gender: Female
Hometown: Wisconsin
Current location: Tejas
Member since: Thu Jan 17, 2008, 12:44 PM
Number of posts: 23,517

About Me

You may say I'm a dreamer But I'm not the only one I hope someday you'll join us And the world will live as one

Journal Archives

Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938

The more things change the more they stay the same ... when you read these paragraphs it will remind you of things you currently hear in the MSM - they are repeating the same lame excuses they always have:


Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938:
Maximum Struggle for a Minimum Wage

By Jonathan Grossman

When he felt the time was ripe,
President Roosevelt asked
Secretary of Labor Perkins,
'What happened to that
nice unconstitutional bill
you had tucked away?'

On Saturday, June 25, 1938, to avoid pocket vetoes 9 days after Congress had adjourned, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed 121 bills. Among these bills was a landmark law in the Nation's social and economic development -- Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (FLSA). Against a history of judicial opposition, the depression-born FLSA had survived, not unscathed, more than a year of Congressional altercation. In its final form, the act applied to industries whose combined employment represented only about one-fifth of the labor force. In these industries, it banned oppressive child labor and set the minimum hourly wage at 25 cents, and the maximum workweek at 44 hours.

Forty years later, a distinguished news commentator asked incredulously: "My God! 25 cents an hour! Why all the fuss?" President Roosevelt expressed a similar sentiment in a "fireside chat" the night before the signing. He warned: "Do not let any calamity-howling executive with an income of $1,000 a day, ...tell you...that a wage of $11 a week is going to have a disastrous effect on all American industry." In light of the social legislation of 1978, Americans today may be astonished that a law with such moderate standards could have been thought so revolutionary.

Courting disaster

The Supreme Court had been one of the major obstacles to wage-hour and child-labor laws. Among notable cases is the 1918 case of Hammer v. Dagenhart in which the Court by one vote held unconstitutional a Federal child-labor law. Similarly in Adkins v. Children's Hospital in 1923, the Court by a narrow margin voided the District of Columbia law that set minimum wages for women. During the 1930's, the Court's action on social legislation was even more devastating ...

Much more here: http://www.dol.gov/dol/aboutdol/history/flsa1938.htm

Minnesota marches forward while Oklahoma falls back -

At a time when many states and cities are working passing minimum wage increases, Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin (R) has gone in the opposite direction and signed a law banning cities from passing higher wages. The bill also bans them from enacting paid sick days or vacation requirements.

The law will stymie the efforts of activists in Oklahoma City, where a labor federation has led the push on a petition to raise the city’s minimum wage to $10.10 per hour. The state’s current minimum has been set at the federal level of $7.25. In 2012, 64,000 workers in the state earned $7.25 an hour or less, making up 7.2 percent of all hourly workers, a larger share than the 4.7 percent figure for the country as a whole.

Fallin said she signed the bill out of the worry that higher local minimum wages “would drive businesses to other communities and states, and would raise prices for consumers.” She also argued that “most minimum wage workers are young, single people working part-time or entry level jobs” and that “many are high school or college students living with their parents in middle-class families.” She warned that increasing the minimum wage “would require businesses to fire many of those part-time workers” and harm job creation ...

More here: http://thinkprogress.org/economy/2014/04/15/3426716/oklahoma-ban-minimum-wage-paid-sick-leave/



And the Minnesota story:


Minnesota makes history with largest minimum wage hike

Article by: BAIRD HELGESON , Star Tribune
Updated: April 14, 2014 - 10:18 PM

The bill, signed into law Monday, will raise the base wage from $6.15 to $9.50 an hour and give raises to more than 325,000 Minnesotans.

Gov. Mark Dayton signed into law the largest minimum wage increase in state history Monday, giving raises to more than 325,000 Minnesotans and making good on a signature Democratic pledge during an election year.

The move to a $9.50 base hourly wage catapults the state from one of the lowest minimum wages to one of the highest once it is fully phased in by 2016. The state’s base wage will be tied to inflation starting in 2018, ensuring the buying power of the state’s lowest-paid workers keeps better pace with the cost of living.

“Minnesotans who work full time should be able to earn enough money to lift their families out of poverty, and through hard work and additional training, achieve the middle-class American dream,” the DFL governor said, surrounded by legislators, workers and labor leaders at a ceremonial bill-signing in the State Capitol rotunda. “These are people, good Minnesotans all over the state, who just want to work and get paid something that is fair.”

More here: http://www.startribune.com/politics/statelocal/255265041.html



Andy Borowitz on Facebook -

He is often funny, but tonight very much so:

Andy Borowitz
Monday, April 14 at 7:30pm ·

The elections in Afghanistan show widespread fraud, which means that the transition to American democracy is complete.

The Crusades of Cesar Chavez: A Biography

Review: Cesar Chavez Remembered, Warts and All
April 14, 2014 / Mark R. Day

The Crusades of Cesar Chavez: A Biography, by Miriam Pawel, 2014.

Book: The Crusades of Cesar Chavez: A Biography, by Miriam Pawel, 2014.

“Cesar was not a humble man,” narrator Luis Valdez says at the conclusion of the new documentary “Cesar’s Last Fast,” about the late farm labor leader Cesar Chavez. “Nor was he a simple man.”

Indeed, Chavez was a controversial and complex figure. That’s the problem with Diego Luna’s feature film “Cesar Chavez,” whose release coincided with the charismatic leader’s March 31 birthday.

Chavez was, of course, a genius and a master organizer. His successes in the vineyards and lettuce fields of California came about as a result of enormous personal sacrifice and his ability to reach out to a wide audience: students, priests, nuns, ministers, labor leaders, and average housewives who made up their minds not to buy grapes ...

- See more at: http://labornotes.org/blogs/2014/04/review-cesar-chavez-remembered-warts-and-all#sthash.bzKLUKk1.dpuf




US fracking companies & Ukraine


Why US fracking companies are licking their lips over Ukraine
From climate change to Crimea, the natural gas industry is supreme at exploiting crisis for private gain – what I call the shock doctrine

Naomi Klein
The Guardian, Thursday 10 April 2014 14.12 EDT

The way to beat Vladimir Putin is to flood the European market with fracked-in-the-USA natural gas, or so the industry would have us believe. As part of escalating anti-Russian hysteria, two bills have been introduced into the US Congress – one in the House of Representatives (H.R. 6), one in the Senate (S. 2083) – that attempt to fast-track liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports, all in the name of helping Europe to wean itself from Putin's fossil fuels, and enhancing US national security.

According to Cory Gardner, the Republican congressman who introduced the House bill, "opposing this legislation is like hanging up on a 911 call from our friends and allies". And that might be true – as long as your friends and allies work at Chevron and Shell, and the emergency is the need to keep profits up amid dwindling supplies of conventional oil and gas.

<snip>

Or the fact that for years the industry has been selling the message that Americans must accept the risks to their land, water and air that come with hydraulic fracturing (fracking) in order to help their country achieve "energy independence". And now, suddenly and slyly, the goal has been switched to "energy security", which apparently means selling a temporary glut of fracked gas on the world market, thereby creating energy dependencies abroad ...

Much more here: http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/apr/10/us-fracking-companies-climate-change-crisis-shock-doctrine

Why No Sustained Protests (Yet)?

Why No Sustained Protests (Yet)?
Sunday, 13 April 2014 00:00 By Richard D Wolff, Truthout | Op-Ed

May Day 2912 protests in Chicago.May Day 2912 protests in Chicago. The organized post-1945 destruction of the New Deal coalition - unionists, socialists and communists - and the failure to replace those organizations helps explain the muted reaction to the bailouts, austerity and other anti-democratic policies pursued by US governments at all levels.

The post-1945 destruction of the New Deal coalition - unionists, socialists and communists - keeps influencing Americans' lives. Today, its effects help explain why popular actions have been so muted against US economic changes since the 1970s and especially against the bailouts and austerity since the crash of 2008. Those effects also suggest what could reignite sustained protests and demands for change.

First to be destroyed after 1945 were the communists. Coordinated attacks came from business, conservatives, government and media. Most academics and liberals (including many who had supported the New Deal coalition) were complicit in that destruction. Once again we witnessed that old repressive tool: rebranding domestic social movements as mere agents of an evil foreign puppet-master. More important, demonizing the communists served to tar other social criticism that included the capitalist economic system with much the same brush.

Second went the socialists ...

More here: http://truth-out.org/opinion/item/23026-why-no-sustained-protests-yet

More on Ukraine ...

There are some good articles right now on L'Humanite discussing the situation in Ukraine.

Winners and Losers
Translated Wednesday 19 March 2014, by Georgie O’Neil

“There is a very real danger of a rise in Russian nationalism in eastern and southern regions, in response to Ukrainian nationalism. We’ve opened Pandora’s box. Almost a quarter of a century after the collapse of the Soviet Union, there is a huge risk of witnessing the further breaking-up of ex-republics, which have been united until now.”

Who will prevail? Who is already losing in the Ukrainian crisis of one-upmanship, rushed into by the US and the EU on the one hand, and Russia on the other? We are currently seeing the results of the confusing lightness displayed by Western diplomacy, when they let the Ukrainian public and political powers believe that it was possible to overcome the difficult eventualities of the negotiation, and that they could impose a major geopolitical change ...

More here - http://www.humaniteinenglish.com/spip.php?article2448

And here - http://www.humaniteinenglish.com/spip.php?article2447

Why Wendy Can Win:

She is running against an idiot. Here is the Wendy Davis campaign on Facebook today:

Wendy Davis
12:11pm (27 minutes ago)
Standardized tests for 4-year-olds? Really, Greg Abbott?


Women telling it like it is:

These memes are from the Christian Left's facebook page. Visit and like them if you're on Facebook and so inclined ... and enjoy:



Rich gain clout as Supreme Court kills political spending limits

David Horsey doesn't just draw awesome political cartoons - he also has a column (you probably already know this - but just in case you're in the same boat as me I'm putting this up here):

Rich gain clout as Supreme Court kills political spending limits

By David Horsey

April 3, 2014, 5:00 a.m.

America has seen some impressive winning streaks -- the Chicago Bulls with Michael Jordan, the New York Yankees for half the 20thcentury, Tiger Woods until his wife caught him with his putter on the wrong green --– but few can surpass the string of wins being racked up by rich people. And now, thanks to the U.S. Supreme Court’s conservatives, the super-wealthy can take another victory lap.

On Wednesday, in a 5-4 ruling, the highest court in the land took one more big step toward eliminating all the campaign finance laws that have been enacted since the Watergate scandal in the 1970s. This time they struck down limits on the amount of money any individual can give to candidates running for the House and Senate.

<snip>

“Taken together with Citizens United, today’s decision eviscerates our nation’s campaign finance laws,” Justice Stephen G. Breyer said in his dissent from the ruling. Some observers predict that the path is now open for the court to kill every remaining restraint on spending in elections ...

More here: http://www.latimes.com/opinion/topoftheticket/la-na-tt-supreme-court-spending-limits-20140403,0,5185172.story#ixzz2xsBpl72y

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