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In_The_Wind

Profile Information

Gender: Female
Current location: Playing in traffic.
Member since: Mon Apr 25, 2005, 10:44 PM
Number of posts: 57,536

About Me

If you really want to know ~ send me a PM.

Journal Archives

Right Time of the Night

G.R.L.



















It's the light at the end of a dark tunnel ...

The bridge reconstruction rerouted all truck loads over 8' 6" wide.
Surprise surprise ... I was on a unplanned vacation this summer.
As things return to normal I'll be able to put aside funds we'll need to get through this winter.
I was seriously getting worried as my attempt at job hunting isn't working out at all.
Not even a nibble.

A little something to go with tomatoes fresh out of the garden ...

___




I don't care for gambling but the entertainment, drinks and in-house dining is usually excellent.

I'm an excellent poker player.
However ... casinos aren't in business to lose ... so I won't donate my money to their coffers.

Have you eaten Cappuccino Potato Chips?

What Dreams May Come

soon ...

*PSA* See the SUPERMOON plus PERSEIDS METEOR SHOWER tonight!

Sunday night brings a supermoon, when the full moon coincides with the moon's closest approach to the Earth during its elliptical orbit around us.




This weekend will be your best chance to see the second of three supermoons this year.
The full moon on August 10th will be the closest and largest full moon in 2014.

When the moon is full as it makes its closest pass to Earth, it becomes a “Supermoon,” and will be up to 31,000 miles closer to Earth than other full moons this year.

According to NASA, this weekend’s full moon will be 14-percent closer and 30-percent brighter than other full moons of the year.

The scientific term for the phenomenon is “perigee moon” or the point when the moon is closest to the Earth in its monthly orbit.

The moon will appear much larger than normal, especially on the horizon.

Like all full moons, this month’s full moon has many names. It’s known as the Sturgeon Moon in North America referencing back to a time in history when sturgeon fish were plentiful and easy to catch in the Great Lakes and Hudson Bay.

It’s also known as the Red Moon, the Green Corn Moon and the Grain Moon.

If you happen to miss the weekend’s supermoon, don’t worry, you will have one more chance to see it this year.

There will also be a supermoon on September 8th. The only difference is it won’t appear quite as big as it will this month.
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