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"It is a mean, nasty book and if I could make it nastier I would."

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pokerfan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 11:21 AM
Original message
"It is a mean, nasty book and if I could make it nastier I would."
On this day in 1939 that John Steinbeck's novel The Grapes of Wrath was published.



Steinbeck didn't expect the book to be popular he told (his agent, Elizabeth Otis), "It is a mean, nasty book and if I could make it nastier I would." In the ending, after the Joad family has fallen apart and the pregnant daughter Rose of Sharon delivers a stillborn baby, she breast-feeds a starving man. When his editor suggested he changed the ending, Steinbeck was furious. He said: "I am sorry but I cannot change that ending. It is casual there is no fruity climax, it is not more important than any other part of the book if there is a symbol, it is a survival symbol not a love symbol, it must be an accident, it must be a stranger, and it must be quick. To build this stranger into the structure of the book would be to warp the whole meaning of the book. The fact that the Joads don't know him, don't care about him, have no ties to him that is the emphasis. The giving of the breast has no more sentiment than the giving of a piece of bread. <...> You know that I have never been touchy about changes, but I have too many thousands of hours on this book, every incident has been too carefully chosen and its weight judged and fitted. The balance is there. One other thing I am not writing a satisfying story. I've done my damndest to rip a reader's nerves to rags, I don't want him satisfied."

http://writersalmanac.publicradio.org/#show%20more%20co...
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xchrom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 11:22 AM
Response to Original message
1. recommend
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hedgehog Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 11:26 AM
Response to Original message
2. The ending always bothered me. It would seem more likely that
Rose of Sharon would express her milk in to a cup for the man. Maybe that never occurred to Steinbeck, or maybe he was thinking of a tradition of wet nursing.
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pokerfan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 11:40 AM
Response to Reply #2
4. Not being equipped to produce milk myself
how well would that work without a breast pump? Perhaps suckling the stranger was just easier. It's certainly an image that people won't soon forget and one that people who are only familiar with the film version aren't familiar with.
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mimitabby Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 12:01 PM
Response to Reply #4
7. you don't need a breast pump to express milk
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pokerfan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 12:27 PM
Response to Reply #7
10. I guess my point is which is easier?
Hand expressing or directly nursing? :shrug:
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Cairycat Donating Member (454 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 06:34 PM
Response to Reply #10
16. It takes time to develop the knack of hand expressing milk
Steinbeck's ending is more realistic and better dramatically for the story.

that said, it can be done - my daughter received only hand-expressed milk, no formula during the day while I was employed full-time.
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Luminous Animal Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 05:05 PM
Response to Reply #7
13. No you don't but, unless one's breast is full to bursting, it ain't easy.
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MorningGlow Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 11:42 AM
Response to Reply #2
5. Hardly the same emotional impact, wouldn't you say?
The way it's written, you never, ever forget the scene.
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hedgehog Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 11:45 AM
Response to Reply #5
6. Given how realistic the rest of the novel is ( Remember how the kids used
all the toilet paper at the one camp because they'd gorged on peaches?), this scene seemed a little contrived. It's possible that it refers back to a form of folk medicine.
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MorningGlow Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 12:17 PM
Response to Reply #6
8. Drama, pure and simple
Dramatic impact, poetic symbolism (mother of the world). Also the physical action of Rose of Sharon cradling the dying man is intended to recreate the positions of Mary and Jesus in the Pieta.

IMO it fits--there's enough symbolism in the whole novel that it doesn't seem too out of place. (It's less "solely realistic devoid of symbolism", let's say, than it appears on first glance.)
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raccoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 07:58 AM
Response to Reply #5
63. +1000. nt
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me b zola Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 12:26 PM
Response to Reply #2
9. Humanity
...and the lack there of. I think the ending is perfect.
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juxtaposed Donating Member (388 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 07:54 PM
Response to Reply #9
19. i agree, when there is nothing else
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Hissyspit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 08:03 PM
Response to Reply #2
20. It's Biblical symbolism, as well.
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Kablooie Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 09:56 PM
Response to Reply #2
35. It was written to make a shocking impact and it did.
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rhett o rick Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 10:22 PM
Response to Reply #2
38. Giving him milk from a cup would be similar to giving him bread. Steinbeck was going for
symbolism. But it will take someone smarter than me to figure it out.
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GoddessOfGuinness Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 10:45 PM
Response to Reply #2
39. Logic tells me that; but when I condiser her sense of loss...
...and that primal call to nurture, and not just feed, that still exists even when the baby is deceased, I think it's not so far-fetched.
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rasputin1952 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 06:07 AM
Response to Reply #2
54. I always understood it as the passing on of life and of doing good...
even in the midst of great tragedy, people will come together for the survival of those even more devastated than themselves. It is the very essence of the thought of loss of life, yet being able to preserve a life.

The Grapes of Wrath was written to express one of the hardest times this nation has ever known. Many had no comprehension of the complete destruction that so many felt and went through. The tiny parts of th movie, and often the most poignant, were simplest...purchasing bread in a store, counting out coins. knowing that each penny was a step to life, while the kids looked at the candy...when I see that, my heart gets torn out an tossed on the floor. Then, suddenly, when all seems so bad, a simple act of kindness when kindness was so rare.; an moment of hope and joy, when hope was scarce, and joy, non-existent.

Steinbeck did such a magnificent job, how he did not go mad writing that is beyond me; the depths he reached to, just so that others could come to some understanding is beyond what most mortals can attain.
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merbex Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 06:21 AM
Response to Reply #54
57. +1000000000000000 n/t
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WinkyDink Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 06:49 AM
Response to Reply #2
59. You are mistaking a writer for a clinician.
Edited on Fri Apr-15-11 06:57 AM by WinkyDink
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raccoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 07:57 AM
Response to Reply #2
62. I know for me, I never heard of expressing milk until maybe 30 years ago.

Maybe Steinbeck didn't know about that either?

It may seem obvious now, but I don't think it would've then.

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av8rdave Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 08:59 AM
Response to Reply #2
67. I think it was important to the story to take place exactly as it did
As Steinbeck himself said, he was portraying a survival situation, where pleasantries and etiquette do not exist. Even when I first read it as a hormonally charged, oversexed teen, I did not see it as a sexual, risqu or even "dirty" scene. To me, it was simple human decency surviving even in the very worst of circumstances. It was one small shred of goodness where there was otherwise none.

I look at it now with as much sadness as ever. Steinbeck shows us today the Republican utopia as far as the poor are concerned.

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xxqqqzme Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 11:27 AM
Response to Original message
3. It's passion
Damn, that kicks ass.
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hedgehog Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Apr-16-11 11:33 AM
Response to Reply #3
84. I came across this by accident and thought it might have some relevence -
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P. Galore Donating Member (95 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 04:59 PM
Response to Original message
11. Here's what Eleanor Roosevelt thought about the book
Edited on Thu Apr-14-11 05:04 PM by P. Galore
http://www.gwu.edu/~erpapers/myday/displaydoc.cfm?_y=19...

...
Now I must tell you that I have just finished a book which is an unforgetable experience in reading. "The Grapes of Wrath" by John Steinbeck, both repels and attracts you. The horrors of the picture, so well drawn, make you dread sometimes to begin the next chapter, and yet you cannot lay the book down or even skip a page. Somewhere I saw the criticism that this book was anti-religious, but somehow I cannot imagine thinking of "Ma" without, at the same time, thinking of the love "that passeth all understanding."

The book is coarse in spots, but life is coarse in spots, and story is very beautiful in spots just as life is. We do not dwell upon man's lower nature any more than we have to in life, but we know it exists and we pass over it charitably and are surprised how much there is of fineness that comes out of the baser clay. Even from life's sorrows some good must come. What could be a better illustration than the closing chapter of this book?

ME AGAIN:
Her view of the movie:

http://www.gwu.edu/~erpapers/myday/displaydoc.cfm?_y=19...

GOLDEN BEACH, Fla., ThursdayYesterday evening we went to see the picture:"Grapes of Wrath." I think it is well done, but I wonder if it will convey to many people the reality of what they are seeing. People laughed near us at some of the broad remarks in the dialogue. I did not feel the tragedy gripped the audience. They did not seem really to know what this story actually meant.

There are some lines that are very well brought out, as for instance, when Mrs. Joad first sees "Tommy" again, after he is back from prison and asks him if he has been hurt so much that he is just "mean-mad." I have felt people were "mean-mad" at times and wondered if life were not treating them so harshly that they were unable to retain any of the qualities which make people lovable and that make life worth living. At the end of the picture the thing which struck me especially was Ma Joad's remark: "Rich people die and their children are no good, but nothing downs us. We are just hardened by misfortune and so we go on. We, the people, live." This is not an exact quotation, but those of you who have seen the picture will remember the idea.

I shall not forget it, for there is something in that beating down of fate which does harden the fibre of a human being. When life is too easy for us, we must beware or we may not be ready to meet the blows which sooner or later come to everyone, rich or poor.

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patrice Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 09:15 PM
Response to Reply #11
26. Wow! - Thanks VERY much for this! nt
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P. Galore Donating Member (95 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 09:54 PM
Response to Reply #26
33. You're very welcome, dear, as She would say. nt
Edited on Thu Apr-14-11 09:55 PM by P. Galore
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patrice Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 11:00 PM
Response to Reply #33
41. I don't really know much about her. These quotes show that though she had a heart for
the people, she was also an intellectual. You can see that in the level of her response to what is a difficult piece of literature.
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defendandprotect Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 12:11 AM
Response to Reply #11
42. Love Eleanor Roosevelt -- !! Were future audiences not "gripped" by the tragedy, however?
Edited on Fri Apr-15-11 12:13 AM by defendandprotect
I've never read the book -- and didn't they change the ending? Not sure now.

But hasn't the public come to understand FROM THE FILM MAINLY that the Joad's

are every man/woman? And their fate, possibly ours?

This is one of the books I've always intended to read -- like many others --

fiction that has been changed for the screen. 10 North Fredriok Street --

Was sadly amused at the Grace Metalious anniversary a few years ago -- PEYTON PLACE!!

And the various important truths in that book which were changed!! Tragic.

And, guess what -- our library had never had a copy of Peyton Place before --

so they picked one up for the anniversary -- and IT WAS AN ABRIDGED COPY!!!

Sad -- so sad -- !!


Would just comment on Tom's imprisonment -- injustice is always with us --

and young men too often locked up to benefit prison systems!



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malaise Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 04:55 AM
Response to Reply #11
52. The Grapes of Wrath remains one of the most important books
ever written in America. It should be required reading for all schoolchildren.
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rasputin1952 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 05:53 AM
Response to Reply #11
53. Brilliant!
:hug:
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loudsue Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 08:01 AM
Response to Reply #11
64. Eleanor writes as if there was still education going on in our society back then.
Oh wait! There WAS education back then! It was in the time BEFORE children were taught from tests.

What a brilliant woman Eleanor was.
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eleny Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 05:05 PM
Response to Original message
12. My favorite quote from one of my favorite books...
" Why, Tom - us people will go on livin' when all them people is gone. Why, Tom, we're the people that live. They ain't gonna wipe us out. Why, we're the people - we go on."
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Lifelong Protester Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 06:16 PM
Response to Reply #12
15. Mine too.
n/t
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eleny Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 06:35 PM
Response to Reply #15
17. _
:fistbump:
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lunatica Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 05:06 PM
Response to Original message
14. It sure ripped my nerves to rags. I literally threw the book across the room
The problem with the ending is not the stranger getting his life saved. It's that the characters you've grown to love are drowned and dead and the family who has battled so hard has just lost the fight of their lives after losing every inch of the way along the path to it. You care. And that hurts.

Steinbeck wanted it to hurt and it did.
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Hissyspit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 08:06 PM
Response to Reply #14
21. I find it so ridiculous that that would be controversial.
Edited on Thu Apr-14-11 08:30 PM by Hissyspit
(That someone would want to write it that way and people would not want it to be written that way, not that people would have a reaction like yours to it.)

I mean it is called the Grapes of WRATH.
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Sonoman Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 08:15 PM
Response to Reply #14
23. Like a great song.
If it doesn't make you soar, laugh, cry, wail or throw it across the room, the time spent composing was wasted.

Sonoman
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Kurovski Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 07:24 PM
Response to Original message
18. Flour and bacon drippings.
I made some to see what it was like when I read the book a second time after high school.

Like most everything else, it was pretty awful.

One of the greatest novels ever.
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deaniac21 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 09:55 PM
Response to Reply #18
34. There is nothing in this world that bacon can't fix.
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pokerfan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 02:17 AM
Response to Reply #18
45. sounds like roux
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dixiegrrrrl Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 05:02 PM
Response to Reply #18
81. Lots of salt and pepper added to it makes it palatable.
I had an aunt who could make the best "drippin'" gravy I have ever tasted. Lots of drippings, lots of flour, but she did have condensed milk and water. It has a unique flavor that one never forgets. It was served over biscuits.
Unfortunately, it was served twice a day, when they were very poor. Biscuits and sometimes fried potatoes.
That was it.
The drippings were in a can by the stove, that you collected, very carefully, every time you cooked ham or bacon, the can was carefully protected, it served for the gravy in good times and in bad times.
My grandma had a can, my mother had a can, for years I kept the same dripping can when I cooked.
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Sonoman Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 08:12 PM
Response to Original message
22. I read that book when I was 10 or 11 years of age.
I read it very slowly over the course of a Texas Summer.

It is still the only work of Steinbeck I have read.

Sonoman
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YellowRubberDuckie Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 08:17 PM
Response to Original message
24. That sounds HORRIBLE.
I need to see how much it costs on Kindle....
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Boudica the Lyoness Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 08:23 PM
Response to Original message
25. I have never read his books.
I can't believe it! What one shall I start with? I want to read them all.

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Maine-i-acs Donating Member (989 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 09:17 PM
Response to Reply #25
29. "The Pearl"
would be a good warm-up to Grapes of Wrath.
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kentauros Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 10:33 AM
Response to Reply #29
75. Or a great way to never read any of his works again.
I hated The Pearl. Not because it was badly written. Just the whole story. I have never read anything else by Steinbeck and I don't feel like I'm missing out.
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northoftheborder Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 09:24 PM
Response to Reply #25
30. "Travels With Charlie" is good. it has humor, and short.
the one about the cannery in San Francisco (I think) "Cannery Row", is good. I've kind of forgotten it. But it was good. I knew his 2nd (or third?) wife's sister. They were both from Texas. (the sisters)
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cameozalaznick Donating Member (624 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 09:53 PM
Response to Reply #25
32. Well, you might work up to this one.
It really is his masterpiece. Start with something a little lighter like "Tortilla Flats" or "Cannery Row." Then graduate to "East of Eden" and "Winter of our Discontent." "The Moon is Down" is a really good short read. Gripping.

IMO, Steinbeck is the greatest American author. You're so lucky to have all that reading ahead of you.

Oh, and BTW, don't be surprised if you find yourself unable to eat while reading "Grapes of Wrath."
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pokerfan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 09:59 PM
Response to Reply #25
36. Cannery Row, Grapes of Wrath, Of Mice and Men, The Pearl
Order doesn't really matter.

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MessiahRp Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 03:28 AM
Response to Reply #36
47. The Red Pony was my first.
Introduced to Steinbeck in 7th Grade and went on to read Of Mice and Men, Cannery Row, Tortilla Flat and Grapes in the course of a year. Not too many authors have drawn me in like that since then.
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kaffy4x4 Donating Member (42 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 03:31 AM
Response to Reply #36
48. You Forgot East of Eden
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pokerfan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 12:08 PM
Response to Reply #48
78. That I did
I guess I didn't have room for all of them in the subject line. :)
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WinkyDink Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 06:56 AM
Response to Reply #25
60. PLEASE begin with "Of Mice and Men."
Edited on Fri Apr-15-11 07:01 AM by WinkyDink
The dignity of the ranch-hands, the pathos of "Curly's wife," the poignance of the "brotherhood" of George and Lennie, and the bleakness of their lives....

I'll tell ya: The utter humbleness and generosity of spirit of Lennie's offering George his non-existent ketchup for their canned beans? THIS is what I say to myself, to remind me, to humble me. Canned beans, and their luxury would be some ketchup.

I taught this novel(la) to well-off suburban kids because. Just because.



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onpatrol98 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 11:24 AM
Response to Reply #60
77. How did they take it?
How did they respond to it? I think Literature would be an awesome subject to teach.
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WinkyDink Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 02:50 PM
Response to Reply #77
80. Let's just say they learned the lesson for class. But one now is in DC working for Republicans.
Edited on Fri Apr-15-11 02:55 PM by WinkyDink
Teaching the literature was fine and dandy; it was grading the tests and papers that consumed my time!
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Hestia Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 08:38 AM
Response to Reply #25
66. "East of Eden" - wonderful book
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sulphurdunn Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 10:26 AM
Response to Reply #66
74. And a pretty good movie too.
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nolabear Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 09:16 PM
Response to Original message
27. Every American today should read this book, so that it does not ever again become reality.
And I will read it again too. Thank you for reminding me to.

Stunning, fearless writing.
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patrice Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 09:16 PM
Response to Original message
28. These are some of the reasons I think The Road is one of the best books.
Though I've read other Steinbeck, I've never read Grapes of Wrath. I shall do so.
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rasputin1952 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 07:18 AM
Response to Reply #28
61. Please do...
I am now 59, I read it when I was 13...46 years later, the impact is there. Just reading this thread brought back so many memories of how I felt when I would read a line, have to lay the book down and think about it for a few minutes, trying to "be" a part of the scene. I walked around in a daze for a couple of days, the impact on me was so striking.

On the other hand, while the movie is good, and many poignant parts jab right to the heart, the book draws you in, it made me feel as if I were there, feeling the pain, the hunger, the loss, the very few moments of hope, and the very scarce joy that cropped up perhaps twice. I lent out my copy many years ago, when I ran into the lendee about two years later, she said she was sorry, but she lent it to someone, and then they lent it to someone. It was one of the few times that even though I had "lost" a book, I felt no remorse, because I knew others were being drawn in as well...and that was the purpose, the thread that would draw hearts and souls together. I hope 100 people read my copy, and I hope 100 more will.
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Taverner Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 09:32 PM
Response to Original message
31. Its too bad that the "Okies" that were so sympathetically portrayed...
...turned on the very hands that tried to help them during this time

Is it any wonder no one feels sorry for poor, white people?
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hedgehog Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 10:12 AM
Response to Reply #31
73. I was just wondering how many of the grandchildren from The Grapes
of Wrath are members of the Tea Party....People determinedly forget the bad times as fast as possible.
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Blue_Tires Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 10:08 PM
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37. ttt
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themadstork Donating Member (797 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 10:54 PM
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40. Steinbeck was a beast.
And from an entirely different age, in terms of American letters. Very few living writers with such integrity.
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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 12:15 AM
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43. I recommend the book
So does my ex-wife, who immigrated to this country and learned from the book much about what makes America great and what makes it trying.
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Zorra Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 12:21 AM
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44. My favorite book of all time. The Great American Novel. nt
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kaffy4x4 Donating Member (42 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 03:22 AM
Response to Original message
46. I recommend this book often
to friends and family who want a true picture of what it takes to survive a truly serious depression. I've read it several times and each time get a gut punch. I had a very hard time reading as a kid until a 7th grade teacher recommended and checked out of the library a book for each kid to read and report on. His choice for me was Steinbeck "Red Pony". I was hooked on Steinbeck from that moment on and read everyone of his books.
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pengillian101 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 04:40 AM
Response to Original message
49. K&R (n/t)
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Enthusiast Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 04:50 AM
Response to Original message
50. We read it. It was wonderful.
It was wonderful but sad.

If people don't wake up soon we could find our way back there.
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Solly Mack Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 04:53 AM
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51. K&R
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rasputin1952 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 06:16 AM
Response to Original message
55. One of the most powerful books ever written...
when I first read it, I had to put it down from time to time, just to take in the emotional impact. It was one of those rare works that grips the soul and wrenches it's mooring, jarring us into a reality we never really realize how close we are to what the Joads and others went through.

Everyone I knew, when I was growing up, walked around in bit of a daze for a while after reading it, the impact was so intense, (this was in the early 60s). I know it changed my view of humanity in general, and eventually established in me a very determined liberal bent to help to make at least my little corner of the world just a little better, if even for just a short time.
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era veteran Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 06:18 AM
Response to Original message
56. This book changed me
I read everything he wrote after reading it.
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lonestarnot Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 06:45 AM
Response to Original message
58. Should be mandatory reading on the decks of yachters.
Edited on Fri Apr-15-11 06:45 AM by lonestarnot
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KittyWampus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 10:43 AM
Response to Reply #58
76. Like Miller's "The Crucible", even if certain people did read it, the meaning would be lost on them.
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raccoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 08:02 AM
Response to Original message
65. K&R. nt
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CrownPrinceBandar Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 09:10 AM
Response to Original message
68. I admit I've only seen John Ford's adaptation........
But Casy's death hit me the hardest. He was so forlorn when he first met up with Tom about losing his faith only to give his life to save the Joad family.

Don't know if I could do the novel, the movie was rough enough. Masterpiece of a story, though.
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pokerfan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 12:43 PM
Response to Reply #68
79. Jim Casy = J.C. = Jesus Christ
Always liked Casy's prayer over Grampa's body. I can't remember how much of it made it into the movie.

"This here ol' man jus' lived a life an' jus' died out of it. I don't know whether he was good or bad, but that don't matter much. He was alive, an' that's what matters. An' now he's dead, an' that don't matter. Heard a fella tell a poem one time, an' he says, 'All that lives is holy.' Got to thinkin', an' purty soon it means more than the words says. An' I wouldn' pray for a ol' fella that's dead. He's awright. He got a job to do, but it's all laid out for 'im an' there's on'y one way to do it. But us, we got a job to do, an' they's a thousan' ways, an' we don' know which one to take. An' if I was to pray, it'd be for the folks that don' know which way to turn. Grampa here, he got the easy straight. An' now cover 'im up and let 'im get to his work."
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P. Galore Donating Member (95 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 05:54 PM
Response to Reply #68
82. Steinbeck kinda liked the folks he met in Hollywood, such as Spencer Tracy,
who a crazed genius also.
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reformist2 Donating Member (998 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 09:14 AM
Response to Original message
69. "Rich fellas come up an' they die, an' their kids ain't no good an' they die out. "
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zanana1 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 09:31 AM
Response to Original message
70. The ending is the most human part of the book.
In all the books that I've read in my 59 years, the end of The Grapes of Wrath is the most human piece of literature I've ever read.
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Lindsey Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 09:59 AM
Response to Reply #70
72. I got my B.A. Degree when I was 41. I gravitated toward film &
literature classes. The Grapes of Wrath was required reading in three of my classes over a five year period. An assignment in one class was to compare and contrast the film w/the book. IMO, The Grapes of Wrath is one of the best written books every written on too many levels that I can get get in to.
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BEZERKO Donating Member (564 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 09:56 AM
Response to Original message
71. Great book
great movie with Henry Fonda.
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pengillian101 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Apr-16-11 03:48 AM
Response to Reply #71
83. "great movie with Henry Fonda"
My all-time favorite movie.
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