Democratic Underground Latest Greatest Lobby Journals Search Options Help Login
Google

Seven out of ten of the most violent states are red states. Two are purple/lean red. One Blue.

Printer-friendly format Printer-friendly format
Printer-friendly format Email this thread to a friend
Printer-friendly format Bookmark this thread
This topic is archived.
Home » Discuss » General Discussion Donate to DU
 
onehandle Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 10:08 AM
Original message
Seven out of ten of the most violent states are red states. Two are purple/lean red. One Blue.
Color me surprised.

1 Louisiana
2 Tennessee
3 Nevada
4 Florida
5 Alabama
6 Texas
7 Arkansas
8 Oklahoma
9 South Carolina
10 Maryland
________________________

10 Most Violent States In The U.S.: The Institute For Economics And Peace

The newest edition of the U.S. Peace Index, developed by the Institute for Economics and Peace, ranks states by level of peacefulness. The index is based on five primary indicators: (1) number of homicides per 100,000 people, (2) number of violent crimes per 100,000 people, (3) number of people in jail per 100,000 people, (4) number of police officers per 100,000 people and (5) general availability of small arms.

Combining these figures, the U.S. Peace Index calculates a number summarizing the overall peacefulness of each state, with low numbers being safer. Currently, the national average is 2.056.

Since 1995, the U.S. has become 8 percent safe, according to the index. Not all states have improved, though. New York's become 32.3 percent safer since 1991, but other states have actually become more dangerous, like North Dakota (47.7 percent more dangerous) and Tennessee (9.3 percent more dangerous). Generally, Southern states tended to be the least safe, with the region scoring 3.13 on the index, compared with the Northeast, calculated to be the safest region with a score of 1.99.

Reducing crime seems to have more benefits than just an increased sense of well-being, too, with the index's authors hinting that safety might have notable economic benefits. If the United States peace index was as low as Canada's (1.392 compared to 2.056), for example, the U.S. Peace Index's authors argue that state governments could save up to $89 billion in incarceration, medical, judicial and policing costs. Add to that an increase in nationwide productivity equivalent to a $272 billion stimulus, as well as 2.7 million newly-created jobs, and it starts to become pretty clear: peace pays.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/04/13/10-most-violen...
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
Recursion Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 10:53 AM
Response to Original message
1. Baltimore: the city that bleeds
Though IIRC the eastern shore isn't helping MD that much either.

Nationally, violence is dramatically falling but also flattening out, so people who thought they were immune are finding out they aren't.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
former9thward Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 11:29 AM
Response to Original message
2. This "index" is very flawed.
It assumes that the "general availability of small arms" will automatically cause violence. There is no evidence of that. It also assumes the more police per capita will automatically reduce violence. Again there is no evidence of that. It ignores the fact that all the cities with massive amount of murders are in the midwest/northeast.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
xchrom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 11:31 AM
Response to Original message
3. recommend
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
DU AdBot (1000+ posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view 
this author's profile Click to add 
this author to your buddy list Click to add 
this author to your Ignore list Thu Aug 28th 2014, 12:19 AM
Response to Original message
Advertisements [?]
 Top

Home » Discuss » General Discussion Donate to DU

Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.1 Copyright 1997-2002 DCScripts.com
Software has been extensively modified by the DU administrators


Important Notices: By participating on this discussion board, visitors agree to abide by the rules outlined on our Rules page. Messages posted on the Democratic Underground Discussion Forums are the opinions of the individuals who post them, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Democratic Underground, LLC.

Home  |  Discussion Forums  |  Journals |  Store  |  Donate

About DU  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

Got a message for Democratic Underground? Click here to send us a message.

© 2001 - 2011 Democratic Underground, LLC