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Turborama Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 03:19 AM
Original message
Catherine Zeta Jones treated for bipolar disorder
Edited on Thu Apr-14-11 03:20 AM by Turborama
Source: BBC

April 13 2011 Last updated at 23:53 GMT

Catherine Zeta Jones has received treatment for bipolar disorder after dealing with the stress of her husband's battle with throat cancer.

Zeta Jones, 41, made a decision to check into a "mental health facility" for a brief stay, said her publicist.

=snip=

Mark Davies, from mental health charity Rethink, said the actress had shown courage in revealing the disorder as there was still a stigma around mental illness.

"Although she'll be feeling pretty fragile and vulnerable, she will have - in a sense - given some comfort to a lot of other people who are probably suffering in silence and probably feeling a great deal of fear," he added.

Read more: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-13073676



What is bipolar disorder?

Bipolar, also known as manic depression, causes severe mood swings that usually last several weeks or months and can be:

* Low mood, intense depression and despair
* High or "manic" feelings of joy, over-activity and loss of inhibitions
* A "mixed state" such as a depressed mood with the restlessness and over-activity of a manic episode

Exact causes of are not known, but it is thought the following play a part:

* Genes seem to be important; if you have a relative with bipolar disorder, your chance of developing it is higher
* There may be a physical problem with the brain systems which control mood
* Stress can trigger mood swings
* People suffering Bipolar II have more than one episode of severe depression, but only mild manic episodes

Source: Royal College of Psychiatrists

More on the symptoms and treatment

I'm passing this on to my mother and her niece in the hope it helps them feel like the stigma is being eroded and become more comfortable with getting help.
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democracy1st Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 03:59 AM
Response to Original message
1. great for her taking total control of that condition is key.
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dkf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 06:21 AM
Response to Original message
2. Why do we care?
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blueclown Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 06:31 AM
Response to Reply #2
3. Know anybody with a mental disease or depression?
Jackass.
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dkf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 06:35 AM
Response to Reply #3
4. Why is this our business?
Leave her some privacy.
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trud Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 06:43 AM
Response to Reply #4
6. I think if you issue a press release
the question of privacy is out the window.
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TuxedoKat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 07:52 AM
Response to Reply #4
10. It's not
but she probably wanted to control how the information was released to the public so it wouldn't leak out by those who might miscontrue the info and harm her or her family. I wish her the best.
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Turborama Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 07:10 PM
Response to Reply #2
13. I didn't know what bipolar was until I heard about a famous person having it
Edited on Thu Apr-14-11 07:17 PM by Turborama
It might well have been Carrie Fisher but I honestly can't remember who it was for sure, there are so many: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_people_affected_by...

I then put 2 and 2 together and realized that's what my mother and her niece has, and my late maternal grandmother had.

It was a shocking discovery but also a relief that everything finally made sense.

As well as having empathy with Catherine and her family/friends, that's why I care.
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trud Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 06:42 AM
Response to Original message
5. can you really develop bipolar disorder?
I though you were born with it.

Not that I'm saying she doesn't have a mental illness, the stress must be enormous.
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Mnemosyne Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 07:13 AM
Response to Reply #5
8. Extreme stress can trigger it. It is hell. Best of luck to Ms. Jones, a very hard row... n/t
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Siouxmealso Donating Member (89 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 07:22 AM
Response to Reply #5
9. I think the woman is just suffering from stress
related to her husband's situation but that's not sufficient to issue a press release over I guess.

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Turborama Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 09:01 PM
Response to Reply #9
17. You're just guessing and coming to an unqualified conclusion that it's "just stress".
Edited on Thu Apr-14-11 09:03 PM by Turborama
Which is actually quite disrespectful and unhelpful.
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Turborama Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 07:53 PM
Response to Reply #5
16. Both. Victims of this very complicated disease are born with it and it develops n/t
Edited on Thu Apr-14-11 07:53 PM by Turborama
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phrigndumass Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 06:52 AM
Response to Original message
7. Thank you for adding the informative portion about the illness itself
When a celebrity is courageous enough to be open and honest about a mental illness, it sheds light on the illness itself and the people who deal with it everyday. Your post does the same by adding the information after the snip. K&R
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SoCalDem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 10:24 AM
Response to Reply #7
12. The sad thing is that they are pressured to "go public"
She has press following her 24/7, so any trip to anywhere is reported on & "twittered" immediately.

Perhaps she would have preferred to keep it private but dared not..

I hope she can get some help & feel better soon.. depression is terrible & she's got a lot on her plate right now..
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Turborama Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 07:42 PM
Response to Reply #7
15. You're welcome. Hopefully at least one person will learn something from this.
Edited on Thu Apr-14-11 07:55 PM by Turborama
I really dislike 'celebrity gossip' but I don't see this as 'gossip', it's a public service.
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The Backlash Cometh Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 10:00 AM
Response to Original message
11. Get better!
My heart goes out to her. She's very brave.
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Terra Alta Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-14-11 07:13 PM
Response to Original message
14. I'm glad she is getting help.
My best friend is bipolar and it's tough to deal with at times.. I wish Mrs. Zeta-Jones the best.
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Turborama Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-15-11 06:45 AM
Response to Original message
18. Sanjay Gupta showed a fascinating MRI on AC360 earlier...
Video: http://ac360.blogs.cnn.com/2011/04/15/video-gupta-break... /

Transcript:

COOPER: A lot of concern and questions tonight about the news that Catherine Zeta-Jones checked into a mental health facility. Her rep tells CNN that Zeta-Jones is seeking treatment for bipolar two disorder, which the Mayo Clinic says is a less severe form of bipolar disorder.

The rep also says she's decided to check into a facility after dealing with the stress of the past year, obviously, when her husband, Michael Douglas, was fighting throat cancer.

So we wanted to get some more information about what exactly bipolar two disorder is and how it can be triggered by traumatic events. For that we went to 360 M.D. Sanjay Gupta.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

COOPER: Sanjay, there's still such stigma over mental health issues in this country. I think for someone as well known as Catherine Zeta-Jones to be very frank about an issue she's facing is really remarkable.

What exactly is bipolar disorder?

GUPTA: Well, it is a -- people refer to it as manic depression. It is a disorder sort of characterized by what is known as mania, manic episodes, and also depressive episodes.

Now manic episodes, people are, you know, really at the highest of highs, and depressed episodes, the lowest of lows. But so much so, Anderson, that it really interferes with your ability to conduct your normal life. These episodes can last a period of time, usually over a week at least. And, you know, it can be so disruptive not only to the individual but to all the people around them.

That's typically what bipolar is sort of characterized by.

You know, what is interesting, if I can show you really quickly, Anderson, is that we have more insight specifically into what's happening in the brain now, as well.

For example, let me show you what is known as a functional MRI of a normal brain. Now up near the top, that's the area of the frontal lobes. That's the area of the brain that's responsible for judgment, for your ability to sort of filter things, to add to -- to filter something, to think before you do, to think before you act. That's a normal brain.

Now, take a look at what a bipolar diagnosed brain, someone who's during a manic episode. You see hardly any activity in those frontal lobes.

COOPER: Wow.

GUPTA: Now, think about that, no activity in the frontal lobes, Anderson, means hardly any filter. You think of something, you immediately say it. You think of something, you immediately do it. You have nothing sort of putting on the brakes. I just find that extremely fascinating, because it's objective evidence of what specifically is happening in the brain during one of these episodes.

COOPER: And she has bipolar disorder two, which I hadn't heard of. How is that different from what you just explained?

GUPTA: Yes. There's a few different types of bipolar, and these are all characterized now, Anderson, by, you know, what's known as a clinical diagnosis. So you're sitting down with a doctor, being asked questions and coming up with the diagnosis.

Basically, the big difference is that, instead of having true manic episodes. They have more of what are known as hypomanic episodes. They still develop mania, which can be, you know, lots of -- it can be lots of activity, fast talking, little sleep. But not quite to the degree of someone who's in a full manic episode. But they still can have the severe depression. Sometimes the depression is even worse than in someone who has classic bipolar or bipolar one.

COOPER: And obviously, she has endured a lot of stress over the past year with Michael Douglas, her husband battling cancer. Does stress trigger bipolar disorder?

GUPTA: I think it can, absolutely. And I think trigger is the right word, as opposed to cause. Because I think, you know, there's mounting evidence that people probably have a predisposition, some sort of genetic predisposition toward it, you know.

We know that children, for example, if they have a parent with bipolar, four to six times more likely to develop it. So there's some genetic component. They haven't identified the genes.

But the trigger, that's always been, you know, something people have been looking for, and stress is certainly a big one.

COOPER: And in terms of -- I think she has checked herself into a facility. For a lot of people, this is something that they live with on a day-to-day basis. It doesn't consume their lives to the point where they can't do anything. Or it can.

GUPTA: Well, I think, you know, true bipolar disease, you know, this classic bipolar, is incredibly disruptive to the individual and incredibly disruptive to the people around them.

I think you know what it is, Anderson? I think it's still so stigmatized that, despite the fact that it's so disruptive, people do not seek treatment, which is incredibly sad. Because while there is no cure, there can be some pretty effective treatments.

And people are often diagnosed very late if they're diagnosed at all with this disease, because they tend to try and mask it, get around it, or they become very socially inward. They don't go out because they're afraid of exhibiting these symptoms.

And again, like I said, we're working on this documentary. But that part of it is, I just think incredibly sad. So there's treatments available out there.

COOPER: Well, again, I just think for her to be so up front, it's going to help a lot of other people out there, who don't -- who haven't talked about it as much or maybe don't even know they have it. Sanjay, thanks.

GUPTA: Thanks, Anderson.

http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/1104/14/acd.01.h...
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