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KIPP Charters got more federal money than public schools. Also high attrition rate helps scores?

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madfloridian Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-07-11 10:41 PM
Original message
KIPP Charters got more federal money than public schools. Also high attrition rate helps scores?
New studies have shown that KIPP Charter Schools have two distinct advantages over public schools. They have received more federal funding in addition to high levels of private money, and they have a 30 percent drop out rate between grades 6 and 8.

From NPR:

KIPP Charter Schools Have Funding Edge, Study Says

One of America's most successful charter-school networks receives more government money than it has previously admitted and it's also not as successful as it has stated, according to a new study.

Researchers say that schools in the Knowledge Is Power Program have a much higher attrition rate than in the school systems from which they draw their students especially among African-American children.


The NPR site links to the New York Times on the subject of the funding.

Study Says Charter Network Has Financial Advantages Over Public Schools

By analyzing Department of Education databases for the 2007-8 school year, the researchers calculated that the KIPP network received $12,731 in taxpayer money per student, compared with $11,960 at the average traditional public school and $9,579, on average, at charter schools nationwide.

In addition, KIPP generated $5,760 per student from private donors, the study said, based on a review of KIPPs nonprofit filings with the Internal Revenue Service.

The study does not offer an explanation for why KIPP schools would get more government financing than regular public schools.

We cant explain it, but thats what the data shows, Dr. Miron said.


KIPP and other charters do not have to keep students who do not perform to their standards. They just let them leave, counsel them out...effectively returning them to their public school which has no choice but to keep them.

Here is more from the Baltimore Sun on the attrition rate:

High attrition, public funding fuel KIPP results, study finds

High levels of attrition, selectivity and government funding have positioned Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) schools as academic leaders, according to a national report published Thursday, which found that the charter networks lauded outcomes in recent years have been a result of serving a distinct population of students while receiving high amounts of public funding.

The report was published by Western Michigan University, and jointly released by Columbia University, in addition to the National Center for the Study of Privatization in Education. The study looked at What Makes KIPP Work: A study of student characteristics, attrition and school finance, basing its conclusions on publically available federal and local data.

KIPP runs two schools in Baltimore. The Knowledge Is Power Program opened the Ujima Village Academy, a middle school, in 2002. In 2009, KIPP opened an elementary school, KIPP Harmony Academy. Both are located in Northwest Baltimore, serving very low-income populations, and are among the best schools in the city.

But nationally, the report found, on average about 15 percent of students drop from KIPP cohorts every year, compared to 3 percent in public schools. Moreover, between grades 6 and 8, about 30 percent of KIPP students drop off of the rolls. The attrition rates in the report, which did not compare KIPP's attrition to similar schools in the district, or in neighboring districts, showed a "tremendous drop off" said the report's lead researcher, Gary Miron.


A website called the Nonprofit Quarterly has more on this study.

A Charter Schools Performance Questioned in New Study

Unfortunately for this network of 99 charter schools 24 elementary, 60 middle schools, and 15 high schools in 20 states plus D.C. a new study from Western Michigan University raises important questions about the reasons for KIPPs reputation of generally high performance.

One reason apparently is that 40 percent of black males enrolled in KIPP schools leave between the 6th and 8th grades. Gary Miron, the lead researcher on the study, called that figure shocking. The issue is not that so many black males leave. It is that the KIPP schools have annual attrition rates of 15 percent compared to roughly 3 percent in the comparable school districts.

The pupils who drop out tend to be the lower performing students who return to the public schools but are not replaced in the KIPP schools. The result is that attrition at KIPP removes the pupils who pull down academic performance scores, leaving typically the better performers and scorers (PDF).

The study finds KIPP typical of other charter schools, which tend not to educate as many disabled and English language-limited students compared to regular public schools that take responsibility for all comers.


But it is not just the KIPP schools that have attrition problems and claim success in spite of it. This of course makes public schools look bad because they have to take all comers.

Charter schools that boast high test scores should reveal their attrition rates as well.

Here is another example.

Williamsburg Collegiate Charter School (WCCS), a member of the wildly successful Uncommon Schools charter network, has a clear mission: to prepare each student for college.

WCCS fits the mold associated with high performing urban charters: most students are African American and Hispanic (99 percent); the majority are eligible for free or reduced-price lunches (83 percent); students wear uniforms; classes are highly structured; and learning time is extended.

...."Sure enough, 11 out of the 13 charter schools showed significant shrinkage in the size of their testing cohorts. And the more the cohorts shrank over time, the higher the percentage of students achieving proficiency rose.

At Williamsburg, this trend was dramatic. Seventy-two 5th graders took the ELA test in 2006 with just under 60 percent achieving proficiency. Three years later, proficiency for that same cohort had skyrocketed to just below 95 percent, but only 44 students remained in the 8th grade cohort. Thats an attrition rate of 39 percent.


The blog EdWize had an article last year entitled Vanishing Studies, Rising Scores

It quotes similar statistics.

As it turns out, high-performing charter middle schools in the New York City also have extremely high rates of attrition in their testing cohorts :

Eight of the thirteen schools have enough data to allow us to examine cohort size between 5th grade, when students enter, and 8th grade, when they graduate.(2) In four of these schools, more than 25% of the students vanished from the cohort. Of these four schools, three saw cohort declines of 30%, and one lost nearly 40%. All of these charters have been nationally or locally acclaimed as great schools that are in high demand. The average attrition for this group of eight is 23%. (charts follow.)These attrition rates contrast starkly with what I found in regular public schools, where the size of cohorts tends to remain the same or rise. (charts follow.)

The remaining five of the thirteen schools are too new to have testing cohorts that span all grades. However, most have high attrition through the grades already completed. Taken as a whole, only two of the thirteen middle school charters show no shrinkage in the size of their testing cohort, thus approaching parity with public schools citywide.

..."Information is not made public regarding the academic proficiency of students who vanish from the cohort. What I do know is that dramatic rises in the percent proficient seem to parallel the rates of attrition in the testing cohorts . I have charted these in the latter part of this post.


Another charter group makes no secret of the fact that they "counsel out" students with problems.

At Harlem Success, disability is a dirty word. Im not a big believer in special ed, Fucaloro says. For many children who arrive with individualized education programs, or IEPs, he goes on, the real issues are maturity and undoing what the parents allow the kids to do in the houseusually mamaand I reverse that right away. When remediation falls short, according to sources in and around the network, families are counseled out. Eva told us that the school is not a social-service agency, says the Harlem Success teacher. That was an actual quote.


It would be interesting to know in what other years KIPP received more money than public schools and other charters. It is odd that could happen at all.

We know that KIPP and TFA are among the largest recipients of federal education money. What is not so well known is that the founder of TFA is the wife of a head of the KIPP charters. And many do not realize that last year they each got 50 million from the DOE.

The term 990 refers to the IRS forms that tax-exempt organizations must file and that by law are available to the public. Included on a 990 is not just essential information on total revenue and total expenses, but a breakdown that includes the compensation of the highest paid employees.

Marcello Stroud sent me TFAs 990 for fiscal 2008. It shows that TFA had revenues of $159 million in fiscal year 2008 and expenses of $124.5 million. CEO and founder Wendy Kopp made $265,585, with an additional $17,027 in benefits and deferred compensation. She also made an additional $71,021 in compensation and benefits through the TFA-related organization Teach for All. Seven other TFA staffers are listed as making more than $200,000 in pay and benefits, with another four approaching that amount.

Its also interesting to look at the 990 for the KIPP Foundation, the charter school chain led by Richard Barth, a former Edison vice president and TFA staffer who also happens to be Kopps husband. Barth made more than $300,000 in pay and benefits, bringing the Kopp/Barth household income to almost $600,000 for their work with TFA and KIPP. (In a 2008 article, the New York Times dubbed Kopp and Barth as a power couple in the world of education, emblematic of a new class of young social entrepreneurs seeking to reshape the United States educational landscape.)

TFAs 990 lists its major contributorssome of the biggest names and players in the privatization of public education.

Looking Past the Spin


And the New York Times points out that they were each given 50 million last year.

Education Department Deals Out Big Awards

Teach for America, the nonprofit group that recruits elite college students to teach in public schools, and the KIPP Foundation, which runs a nationwide network of charter schools, were big winners in a $650 million federal grant competition known as Investing in Innovation, the Department of Education said Wednesday.

Each group won $50 million. Two others won large awards for proposals the department said were backed by significant evidence of success with students.


All that money going to them while public school teachers are being laid off by the hundreds all over the country....many being replaced by TFA teachers.

The idea behind KIPP and other charters is that parents be required to be involved in their child's education. Trust me, I am all for that.

However when all is said and done, some of the parents don't meet those requirements. And that is where the bottom line comes in...charter schools do not have to keep the student. They send the student back to the public school, which must keep them no matter what.

There is all too often no guarantee that the thousands of dollars of public money that followed the student to the charter school will return with him to the public schools.

It's a dismantling of public education, and none of our leaders is sounding the alarm.

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MichiganVote Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-07-11 10:46 PM
Response to Original message
1. K&R
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Angry Dragon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-07-11 10:56 PM
Response to Original message
2. We will see tiered education more and more in this country
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madfloridian Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-08-11 12:00 AM
Response to Reply #2
5. Exactly
Edited on Fri Apr-08-11 12:05 AM by madfloridian
It's well underway now.
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msongs Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-07-11 11:10 PM
Response to Original message
3. lol "some of our leaders" are leading the charge, heard of "race to to top"? nt
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madfloridian Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-07-11 11:51 PM
Response to Reply #3
4. You are right.
The Race to destroy public education is being run by both parties.

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Starry Messenger Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-08-11 12:40 AM
Response to Original message
6. k&r
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madfloridian Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-08-11 01:16 AM
Response to Original message
7. More from the WMU study about attrition.
http://www.wmich.edu/wmu/news/2011/04/009.html

"I am surprised that KIPP gets more money from the federal government especially because KIPP has limited special education services which are subsidized with federal dollars," says Dr. Gary Miron, WMU professor of educational leadership, research and technology and the report's lead researcher. "Charter schools traditionally receive less money because they provide fewer services like special education and vocational training. That is why it's surprising that KIPP receives more money than all of our comparison groups from public sources."

None of the 12 KIPP districts reported any private revenues in the national school district finance dataset; however, a separate analysis of these districts' 990 tax forms for 2008 revealed large sums of private contributions. Per-pupil contributions for the 11 KIPP districts that the researchers included in this analysis equaled an average of $5,760, much more than the $1,000 to $1,500 additional per-pupil revenue KIPP estimates is necessary for their program. Two KIPP districts or groups received more than $10,000 per pupil in private revenues.

Combining public and private sources of revenue, KIPP received, on average, $18,491 per pupil in 2007-08. This is $6,500 more per-pupil than what KIPP's local school districts received in revenues. Some KIPP students have as much as a $10,000 advantage over their peers in traditional public schools.

Jessica Urschel, a graduate student and co-author of the study, notes, "An interesting finding that appeared from our analysis of expenditures revealed that KIPP spends less on instructional costs, even while it has a longer school year and receives more money per pupil than local districts."
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WinkyDink Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-08-11 05:47 AM
Response to Reply #7
11. "I am surprised that KIPP gets more money from the federal government ...." = NOT PAYING ATTENTION.
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KamaAina Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-08-11 02:09 PM
Response to Reply #7
18. I thought charters were supposed to provide special ed just like traditional public schools
The charter parrots squawk over and over again, "They're the same as traditional public schools except for the work rules. Rawwwwwk!" Then stuff like this comes out. :eyes:

That certainly hasn't been the case in charter capital NOLA, where kids with disabilities generally end up in the state-run Recovery School District schools.
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madfloridian Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-08-11 09:09 PM
Response to Reply #18
23. I found a wonderful chart about KIPP and sped and ell students. Says it all.
These charts compare the host district with KIPP in percentage of students who are English language learners or have disabilities.

Thanks to Schools Matter for presenting the report so clearly.

http://www.schoolsmatter.info/2011/04/secrets-behind-ki...


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glinda Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-08-11 01:21 AM
Response to Original message
8. Sounds like a good reason for an investigation.
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msanthrope Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-08-11 09:18 AM
Response to Reply #8
16. Eh--the cited study forgot to include California.
That's not the study I'd use for investigation. Perhaps there's another one, that includes the most populous state?
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madfloridian Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-08-11 01:38 AM
Response to Original message
9. FL charter openly dismisses non-performers with letter to parents.
The local school board has no control over this school, whose head is in the FL legislature.

http://www.theledger.com/article/20100928/NEWS/10092980...

"During a work session this morning, O'Reilly read a letter sent by Harold Maready, superintendent of McKeel charter schools, to a parent about their third grader who flunked the FCAT.

Your child does not meet the criteria to be a McKeel student, O'Reilly read.

If public schools were to reject students based on their academic performance, then they could be A schools, too, O'Reilly said.


We must take every child that comes through that door whether we like it or not, O'Reilly said. That is a public school paid by taxpayers' dollars, and I like to remind Mr. Maready of that.
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glowing Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-08-11 05:46 AM
Response to Original message
10. I understand Charter/ Privatizing isn't about bettering education but bleeding tax payers dry..
However, why are our schools still operating as if every child is going to be working for NASA (which is no more)? Why are we not accenting education for the child... A child with special needs will need perhaps more tutoring on basic living (so they can live and function independently as much as possible if possible). A child with music talents should be accenting that education; likewise the artist and the dancer. More options of "trade" training in the last couple of years so that a nurse or police officer or firefighter is ready to graduate into the real world with experience and knowledge to live a life... Or the "college" prep courses designed to accel the college experience. It is unrealistic to think that all kids are going to go to college. Many "trade" schools are 2 yr programs that could be utilized in a merged manner.

The other reality is that any career that is had should pay a livable wage. It never makes much sense to me that the person jet setting around with the corporate perks is all that more special than the person servicing the mans jet or flying the man to and there...
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WinkyDink Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-08-11 05:49 AM
Response to Reply #10
12. It's about LOOTING. "EDUCATION" and "JOB TRAINING" ARE NOT THE POINT!!!!!!
Edited on Fri Apr-08-11 05:54 AM by WinkyDink
They don't care.

Standardized Tests are from private companies, so more and more testing will be done = $$$$ to the private sector.
Computer programs in classrooms, like Neil Bush's "Ignite" = $$$$ to the private sector.
Praise from the Feds and taxes siphoned from public education = $$$$ to the private sector.
Tuition = $$$$ to the private sector.
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Angry Dragon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-08-11 08:57 AM
Response to Original message
13. It is all about the money ......... Follow the money
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Reader Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-08-11 09:06 AM
Response to Original message
14. When will we see a documentary about charter schools ripping off taxpayers?
*crickets*

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madfloridian Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-08-11 10:14 AM
Response to Reply #14
17. Yes, louder and louder...
the *crickets* that is. The chirping gets louder.
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proud2BlibKansan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-08-11 09:14 PM
Response to Reply #14
25. There's a documentary coming out soon
I'll post more about it when it's released.
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msanthrope Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-08-11 09:13 AM
Response to Original message
15. The study you cited forgot to include California, thus inflating the numbers.
Edited on Fri Apr-08-11 09:17 AM by msanthrope
Can you explain why California wasn't included????


"Because the study used a sample of KIPP schools that did not include any schools in California, which provides only meager financing to charters, it had produced an exaggerated picture of average government financing for the schools nationwide, Mr. Wright said.

He estimated average government financing nationwide at between $9,000 and $10,000 per KIPP student.

The study significantly inflated private revenues, Mr. Wright said, because KIPP itself had miscategorized some government money as private revenues in its reporting to the I.R.S.

In addition, the Michigan researchers mixed private donations earmarked for school construction with donations for operating expenses, thereby further inflating the studys estimate of per-pupil operating revenues derived from philanthropy, Mr. Wright said."

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/31/education/31kipp.html...

If you are going to make a case against KIPP, then why would you not include California data???
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BrklynLiberal Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-08-11 05:29 PM
Response to Original message
19. K&R
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Jakes Progress Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-08-11 05:59 PM
Response to Original message
20. K&R You keep laying it out, but
the reaction or lack of it here is evidence that Democrats can be just as big hypocrites as republicans.

If anyone says they would have supported these moves under bush, they are hopefully lying. And to remain quiet while the wholesale slaughter of American education takes place just because a Democrat is doing it, shows true cowardice.
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madfloridian Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-08-11 08:56 PM
Response to Reply #20
22. I agree. Not a single Democratic leader is standing up for public education.
It is cowardly and it is dishonest.
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proud2BlibKansan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-08-11 09:14 PM
Response to Reply #20
26. +1
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TBF Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-08-11 08:52 PM
Response to Original message
21. Recommended.
I'd like to know what KIPP is doing with all this money. I have actually been to a KIPP dinner in which private folks were donating large sums of money. Are they considered non-profit? Very bizarre.
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madfloridian Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-08-11 09:11 PM
Response to Original message
24. Great charts about % of ELL and Special Ed students at Kipp. Very powerful.
These charts compare the host district with KIPP in percentage of students who are English language learners or have disabilities.

Thanks to Schools Matter for presenting the report so clearly.

http://www.schoolsmatter.info/2011/04/secrets-behind-ki...


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HankyDubs Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Apr-09-11 12:16 AM
Response to Reply #24
27. I have a problem with something you said in this piece
Edited on Sat Apr-09-11 12:26 AM by HankyDubs
"They just let them leave, counsel them out...effectively returning them to their public school which has no choice but to keep them."

Goddamit madflo...I am proud as hell to serve these students. "No choice?"

"No choice" but to cherish our time with these lil "undesirables" and give them the best chance in life that we possibly can.

This is the job for chrissakes! Never for one moment lose sight of what makes US different than THEM!
:rant:
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madfloridian Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Apr-09-11 12:52 AM
Response to Reply #27
28. Now you know what I meant. I taught and loved them as well.
Edited on Sat Apr-09-11 12:53 AM by madfloridian
And to see the charters be able to kick them back and hurt their feelings just kills me. I had a kid sent back from a magnet school. Smart and great kid. He had a wonderful sense of humor, but they did not tolerate it. It took me months to help him gain confidence back.

But I am right, the charters DO send them back and they are getting away with it.

But.....there is no choice except for charters and magnets, etc. I was proud to teach them, too.

Those are the words of Eva Moskowitz's teacher at Harlem Success charter....they "counsel them out".

Read some of journal work, you will see my anger that they can dismiss them.
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HankyDubs Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Apr-09-11 01:35 AM
Response to Reply #28
29. I sure did
Edited on Sat Apr-09-11 02:09 AM by HankyDubs
and I read all your journals. We couldn't possibly hope for a better advocate...but your word choice in that spot bothered the crap out of me. Words matter here.

We can't make that point often enough or strongly enough. When you get past all the bubble tests and the pacing guides, the thing that separates the people with the talent, the experience and the training from the people who tape their kids mouths shut is the fact that the "bad kids" aren't rejects to us. They are the mission.

When I run into people and they ask me about "Superman" I always make that point to them. The charters dump them because they don't want the test scores, but there is still a place where the "undesirables" are welcomed. That's how we cut through the propaganda. That's when their eyes widen and they get it.

Keep banging that drum. Love ya. :fistbump:
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LooseWilly Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Apr-09-11 02:48 AM
Response to Original message
30. The irony is that, with state budget cuts, college tuitions will soon be unaffordable anyway...
So, even if the charter school scam were working as advertised... and all students could be better educated... it really wouldn't matter because only the wealthiest or most willing to go into debt will be able to go on to college... and then only the most well connected will be able to get the shrinking numbers of jobs that will allow one to pay back the debt that is likely necessary.

Public resources are being bled off to private pockets in order to prepare the youth to pay for the chance to pursue increasingly unobtainable goals... but the debt they'll be saddled with will be guaranteed.

I can't quite decide which is the insult and which the injury being added to... :+
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leveymg Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Apr-09-11 08:37 AM
Response to Original message
31. KIPP's formula for academic success: gaming the system, cherry-picking, and creative accounting
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