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I'll criticize Obama when needed, but goddamn it he's still my president!

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Hugabear Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Apr-04-11 09:59 PM
Original message
I'll criticize Obama when needed, but goddamn it he's still my president!
Am I disappointed with Obama? Sure, there are plenty of things that I disagree with him on, some of them more strongly than others. But as much as I might disagree with him on various issues, he still has my support as President. I don't think any of us can even begin to comprehend the pressures involved in being POTUS. I'm not giving him a pass because of this, and I'll still continue to criticize him whenever I feel the need to do so. But this is not the time to abandon him.

Like it or not, the Tea Party is gaining momentum. No, they don't have a lot of popular support. But they don't need a lot of popular support. Because they are united, they're united in their hatred towards Obama. They're united in their hatred towards minorities, unions, the poor, the working class, and the unemployed. It's that unity that helped propel Rick Scott, Scott Walker, and others in the 2010 elections. It's this unity that has helped propel Michele Bachmann into the forefront of the GOP race. These people have no interest whatsoever in playing politics, making compromises, etc.

As such, this is not the time to present a divided front. Yes, we can still criticize Obama when needed. But all this talk about not supporting him in 2012, of hoping for a primary challenger, etc is not helpful whatsoever. The last thing this country can afford is voter apathy in 2012, yet that's exactly where we're headed at this rate. And that's exactly what the Tea Party fanatics are counting on.
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RKP5637 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Apr-04-11 10:01 PM
Response to Original message
1. I'm with you 1000% + in all you just said! n/t
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Liberal_Stalwart71 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Apr-04-11 10:03 PM
Response to Original message
2. AMEN!! K&R!!
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pettypace Donating Member (695 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Apr-04-11 10:05 PM
Response to Original message
3. Obamabots unite!
We need to stand behind him 100 percent.

Anything less is not acceptable!

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emulatorloo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Apr-04-11 10:06 PM
Response to Reply #3
4. That's not what Hugabear said. And you damn well know it.
So drop the exaggeration and hyperbole.
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pettypace Donating Member (695 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Apr-04-11 10:18 PM
Response to Reply #4
10. You've errored
I'm a proud Obamabot and damn well proud to say it. Have had an OBAMA for president sticker since October 2004. Bet that trumps you.

I've got more Obama shirts than you have hats so don't throw stones at me, thank you very much.
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emulatorloo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Apr-04-11 10:21 PM
Response to Reply #10
12. Sorry, I am sensitive tonight
I am seeing a lot of fact free snarky anti-democratic rhetoric tonight, I missed your tone and thought your post was another one of those

I apologize for misinterpreting you.

:toast:
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pettypace Donating Member (695 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Apr-04-11 10:23 PM
Response to Reply #12
14. No harm done.
Cheers!
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MineralMan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Apr-05-11 08:13 AM
Response to Reply #3
25. -10
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cantbeserious Donating Member (270 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Apr-04-11 10:06 PM
Response to Original message
5. Nice Sentiment, However, Obama Has Presented A Divided Front By Not Supporting
The people that elected him with policy after policy that favor the ultra wealthy.

See this video of Dr. Cornell West that insightfully points out Obama is becoming a puppet of the Wall Street oligarchs.

http://www.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.ph...
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emulatorloo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Apr-04-11 10:10 PM
Response to Reply #5
6. DU does not reflect real world Democrats.
Edited on Mon Apr-04-11 10:12 PM by emulatorloo
We have all kinds of arguments, but we aren't representative.

Dr. West is entitled to his opinion but it is a minority opinion.

Best not to pretend otherwise.

http://www.gallup.com/poll/124922/Presidential-Approval...

Obama Approval Rating March 28 - April 3, 2011

Among all Democrats 80%
Among Liberal Democrats 83%
Among Moderate Democrats 77%
Among Conservative Democrats 61%


EDIT clarify poll language
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cantbeserious Donating Member (270 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Apr-04-11 10:15 PM
Response to Reply #6
7. OK - Not Sure What Point Is Being Made - How Are DU Democrats Different?
eom
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emulatorloo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Apr-04-11 10:22 PM
Response to Reply #7
13. We are a rarified group, self-selected political junkies
Edited on Mon Apr-04-11 10:24 PM by emulatorloo
EDIT pronoun
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dennis4868 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Apr-04-11 11:20 PM
Response to Reply #7
18. DU dems are different...
because there is no way that 80% of DUers approve of Obama....DUers blame Obama for congress being broken causing watered down legislation. Most DUers forget what a democracy is and blame Obama 100%. Most dems are not like this.....
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Hugabear Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Apr-04-11 10:15 PM
Response to Reply #5
8. As I said, he's not perfect by any means
And yes, I would prefer a president who would remain true to their progressive roots.

However, at this point in time, I don't really know how realistic that is. For one thing, I don't really think that a true progressive (ie Alan Grayson) would really have a chance of getting the party nomination or winning the general election.

I know it's a cliche to say that there's no real difference between the political parties, that they're merely two sides of the same coin. While it may be true that presidents feel a need to pander towards the "center", I refuse to believe that there's no difference. Does anyone really think that there wouldn't be any difference if McCain were President? Do you think it would matter if someone like Bachmann or Gingrich became president in 2012?
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ProSense Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Apr-04-11 10:26 PM
Response to Reply #5
15. Cornel West
has been saying the same thing for years, he simply added Obama to the list.

Cornel West on the Election of Barack Obama: "I Hope He Is a Progressive Lincoln, I Aspire to Be the Frederick Douglass to Put Pressure on Him"

<...>

AMY GOODMAN: Professor Cornel West, you were a big supporter of Barack Obama, but you also have been giving speeches about holding him to account. What are the issues you are most concerned about right now?

CORNEL WEST: Well, I think, as a deep Democrat, I recognize I have some significant differences with Brother Barack. Hes a liberal. It looked like he wants to govern as a liberal-centrist, given the choices of EmanuelRahm Emanuel and others. And one has to be honest and candid in terms of ones criticism, because in the end, its not about Barack Obama, its about empowering working people and poor people. Its about trying to accent the dignity of those Sly Stone called everyday people. And when he moves in that direction, its good. When he doesnt move in that direction, we need to criticize him. Same is true in terms of foreign policy: Latin America, Africa and the Middle East. We have to be honest about it.

For me, my criticism of Barack has to do with trying to acknowledge the degree to which, one, thank God were at the end of the age of Ronald Reagan, were at the end of the era of conservatism, were coming to the end of the epoch of the Southern Strategy. For the first time now, weve got some democratic possibilities. This has been a political ice age, and the melting is just beginning. And Barack Obama is a symbol, but weve got to move from symbol to substance. Weve got to move from what he represents in a broad senseand its a beautiful thing to have a black man in the White House, we know that, and black slaves and laborers and other white immigrants built the White House. And to have a black family there, significant; black face for the American empire, fine. Can we revitalize democratic possibilities on the ground with Barack in the White House? I think we can. We can put some serious pressure on him, and we can actually continue the democratic awakening among working people and poor people and push Barack in a progressive direction.

AMY GOODMAN: Can you talk about just this latest news that came out last nightof course, not the official announcement, but Eric Holder, the former deputy attorney general under President Clinton, being tapped as the next attorney general, if confirmed?

CORNEL WEST: Well, two things. First, on a personal level, I know Brother Eric Holder. Ive spent good time with him in meetings and so on. Hes a brilliant lawyer. Hes a very decent human being. I know he was very upset about Clintons attitude toward crime. We know during the Clinton administration we got the tightening of the mandatory sentences thats had devastating effects on poor communities, especially disproportionately black and brown poor communities. And Eric took a strong stand in that regard. I appreciate that, because theres a sense that we kind of whitewash the Clinton administrationwelfare bill, crime, deregulation and so forth. Weve got to be honest about some of the flaws during the age of Reagan and the Clinton moments during the age of Reagan. And Eric did take a stand.

<...>


Video: The Precarious Fate of Barack Obama

Transcript:

Cornel West: I think that my dear brother Barack Obama, President Obama, he's a very complicated fellow. He has a sterling democratic rhetoric at his best that reminds you of Saul Alinsky and the others at times. He has a technocratic team when it comes to policy, so there's not just a tension but oftentimes there's contradictions between the two, you see. He comes out of a black tradition that has been explicit about telling the truth about white supremacy, but he himself holds race at arm's length until there's a crisis: Jamal right here, and Skip Gates there, you see. And it's partly because he's such a masterful politician. He's brilliant, he's charismatic, he's a masterful politician. And he's concerned about cutting the deal and winning the election. And I think in the end this is going to be a major challenge for him.

He has to decide whether he wants to be an Abe Lincoln, who began as a mediocre politician -- remember, Abe Lincoln supported the first proposed thirteenth Amendment that set slavery for ever in the U.S. Constitution. Frederick Douglas bought a ticket to go to Haiti; he said, I would never live in a nation that has an unamendable amendment. Lincoln supported that. That was opportunistic at the core; he hated slavery, but he was willing to say keep these people in slavery for ever to preserve the union. You see, that's not the Lincoln that we talk about as great. Lincoln became great because of Harriet Beecher Stowe, Wendell Phillips, Charles Sumner, who was beat up by Preston Brooks from South Carolina, Frederick Douglas, Sojourner Truth, Harriet Tubman. It was the abolitionist movement that helped make Lincoln great. Barack Obama has a choice between the greatness of a Lincoln and the masterful Machiavellian sensibilities of a Bill Clinton, who was brilliant, charismatic, masterful, but tended to be too opportunistic. So far, Barack Obama has leaned more toward the Clinton side than the Lincoln side. That was partly because he doesn't have an abolitionist movement equivalent. He doesn't have a social movement. That's what we need to do: we need to put pressure on him.

Question: What would this effort look like?

Cornel West: Well, it's a very good question. I mean, the kind of thing you're doing here on the Internet is very important, because it won't take the old traditional form of just hitting the streets. Hitting the streets will be one form; it's got to take a whole host of different forms, different voices, different views, different visions put forward, critiques of what's going on behind the scenes to reveal the contradictions of the Obama administration. We need young people who are looking at the world through a very different set of lenses than even myself, because I'm old-school, you know. And no school has the monopoly on truth. Yes, I do still see classes, and I see empires and so forth and so on. But there's also ways of looking at the world through popular culture that young people have that I don't fully understand, so that some of their criticisms would take forms that it will take me time to understand and grasp, you see. But we have to have the courage to not just raise our voices, but connect into organizations so that people can begin to see there are alternatives than the old neoliberalism dressed up in fashionable form, with a democratic rhetoric that hides a concealed technocratic policy. And it could be that, you know, Barack Obama himself, you know, he's waiting to make his turn toward Lincolnesque greatness. He hasn't made it yet, and of course the decision on Afghanistan is going to be very important. It's going to be difficult to have a peace prize and be a war president.

His current statement is being pushed as if it's an epiphany based on the President's first two years.



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Name removed Donating Member (0 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Apr-04-11 10:30 PM
Response to Reply #5
16. Deleted message
Message removed by moderator. Click here to review the message board rules.
 
dennis4868 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Apr-04-11 11:18 PM
Response to Reply #5
17. sorry....
but about 87% of dems disagree with you....DU does not reflect what's really going on out there in the political world. Most dem voters understand the political environment that Obama has to deal with and that considering everything he has made GREAT progress all across the board. As Obama told us in 2008, change is slow, especially in Washington. Most dem voters don't blame Obama for the broken congress that has led to some watered down legislation that still has meat and makes a difference in peoples lives. For instance, thanks to financial reform, I now get detailed notice from my bank when they want to raise an interest rate on me. This has helped me tremendously. And better yet, my baby girl now has health insurance even though she has a preexisting condition. Obama has made great progress and there is more to do so lets work to get more dems in congress (not the DINO types that Howard Dean gave us).
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cantbeserious Donating Member (270 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Apr-05-11 06:13 AM
Response to Reply #17
20. OK - How Does All That Supposed Progress Make Up For Selling Out To Wall Street?
eom
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Name removed Donating Member (0 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Apr-05-11 08:11 AM
Response to Reply #20
24. Deleted message
Message removed by moderator. Click here to review the message board rules.
 
cantbeserious Donating Member (270 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Apr-05-11 06:05 PM
Response to Reply #24
27. We Will Have To Agree To Disagree Then - Our World Views Are Too Different To Reconcile
eom
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w8liftinglady Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Apr-04-11 10:16 PM
Response to Original message
9. As I talked with a patient and his family about getting out the vote today
GOTV will be critical in many arenas,not just the presidential one.
In Texas, there will be a large sector of possible Democratic voters... but we HAVE to be united on this one.

get them registered,get them to the polls.

In blue states,maybe it's a non-issue.
In Red states with no public transportation,it is ESSENTIAL.
Viva La Raza! Go Texas Democrats!
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davidthegnome Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Apr-04-11 10:18 PM
Response to Original message
11. To some extent I'm with you, but..
Would a progressive primary challenger really be such a bad thing? I understand the concerns that it would divide the party further, cause endless bickering and perhaps strengthen the republican position... still, I'm not so sure it would be a bad thing. The Republicans will have their own primary battle to fight - we won't, without a challenge, I'm still not sure that makes us stronger or more enthusiastic. In fact I think it does the opposite.

That said, I don't think the issue is reason for concern. I really don't think there will be a primary challenger. On the other hand... if there is one, it might make some democrats sit up and pay attention. Perhaps they might even realize that they can't simply go on taking a large portion of their base for granted indefinitely. Every vote matters.

I can't help my voter's apathy when I feel I'm being condescended to and taken for granted.
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JTFrog Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Apr-05-11 08:19 AM
Response to Reply #11
26. Yes, it would really be such a bad thing.
Next question?

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proud patriot Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Apr-04-11 11:21 PM
Response to Original message
19. amen
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ReggieVeggie Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Apr-05-11 06:21 AM
Response to Original message
21. how is it that disagreement leads to apathy?
If I were apathetic, I'd have no incentive to disagree. And what are you suggesting? That Democrats should look and act like the mindless Pukes we're always railing against?
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JackDragna Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Apr-05-11 06:42 AM
Response to Original message
22. Unless you're a millionaire many times over..
...he's not even close to being "your" president.
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lunatica Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Apr-05-11 06:45 AM
Response to Original message
23. I'm sure as shit not giving the Tea Bag Party one damn inch
So, yeah, I'm supporting the President come next election
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