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The Campaign to Privatize the World..From Private Schools to Bottled Water, Parks, Toll Roads, etc.

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KoKo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-20-12 02:51 PM
Original message
The Campaign to Privatize the World..From Private Schools to Bottled Water, Parks, Toll Roads, etc.
Published on Friday, April 13, 2012 by Common Dreams
The Campaign to Privatize the World
by David Macaray

One of the biggest con games going on at the moment is the sustained attack on the U.S. public school system. Its being perpetrated by predatory entrepreneurs (disguised as concerned citizens and education reformers) hoping to persuade the parents of school-age children that the only way their kids are going to get a decent education is by paying for something that they can already get for free. You might say its the same marketing campaign that launched bottled water.

The profit impulse fueling this drive is understandable. All it takes is a cursory look at the economic landscape to see why these speculators are drooling at the prospect of privatizing education. Millions of students pulling up stakes, bailing out of the public school system, and enrolling in private or charter schools? Are you kidding? Just think of the money that would generate.

Mind you, these education reformers are the same people who want to privatize the worldthe same people who want more toll roads, who want hikers to pay trail fees, who want city parks and public beaches to charge admission. Indeed, theyre the same tribe who convinced a thirsty nation to voluntarily pay for drinking water that it could otherwise get for free.

Before comparing private and public schools, lets revisit that bottled water craze, the stunning marketing phenomenon that made beverage companies wealthy and added a billion plastic bottles to our landfills and oceans. For the record, since passage of the Safe Drinking Water Act (1974), municipal water, unlike bottled, has been stringently regulated by the EPA, which is why bottled water contains more impurities and bacteria. In truth, city water is safer, cheaper and better for the environment.

Of course, there are people who refuse to believe one word the government (municipal or otherwise) tells them. They dont believe the census, they dont believe the figures in the federal budget, and they regard EPA statistics as state-sponsored propaganda. Fine. Youll never get these people to change their minds, so save your breath. Let them, Grover Norquist, and Orly Taitz do whatever it is they do.

And then you have your beverage connoisseurs who (even though blind taste-tests tend to dispute this) insist that they can not only instantly tell the difference between bottled and tap water, but can tell the difference between varying brands of bottled water. Im not saying that some of these epicureans (taste-test evidence aside) cant do this. All Im saying is that theyre fanatical about it.

Offer a glass of tap water to a beverage connoisseur whobefore the bottled water craze swept the nationhad happily guzzled city water his entire life, and hell recoil in horror, as if youd invited him to drink from your toilet. Ive joked with these people that if I ever introduced a brand of bottled water, I would name it Placebo.

Back to education. The thing about private schools is that theyre very much like bottled water. They are far less regulated than public schools. In fact, theyre largely unregulated. Take California, for example. In order to teach in a California public school (elementary, intermediate or high school), you must have both a college degree and a teaching credential. The private schools require neither.

More at.............

http://www.commondreams.org/view/2012/04/13-1?print
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dtexdem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-20-12 03:41 PM
Response to Original message
1. I long ago stopped drinking tap water, first because of algae blooms.
Once the weather got hot, the water would taste horrible. This remains a problem where I live. (A problem I never had in San Francisco, with its Hetch Hetchy water).

That led to worrying about various contaminants in the water that reaches our taps.

So now I drink either bottled water (buy it in gallons) or filtered (as my fridge will do).

The issue here is another form of privatization: private profits based on lowering costs by pushing the costs of pollutants onto all of us by dumping, runoff, and so on into water sources.
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KoKo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-20-12 04:21 PM
Response to Reply #1
3. Good point there about our water. And, the Fraking that's coming...
is going to make it worse with pollutants getting into our water supply (already happening...documentaries about it) and news. But...doesn't matter...protest or not. It's coming in all our states. They are buying up "mineral rights" from homeowners in North Carolina now. Few states will be untouched by this. Desperate people willing to seel mineral rights...put food on the table..help pay their mortgage. It's very depressing ...given how much push back there's been...yet, it's a done deal from what I can see with Congress and I don't think Obama is against it either.
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No Elephants Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Apr-22-12 07:20 AM
Response to Reply #1
6. Another of the countless reasons why making the rich pay more taxes is not warfare, but simply fair.
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Leopolds Ghost Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-20-12 04:10 PM
Response to Original message
2. It's the death of the public commons
Elimination of drinking fountains and public phones are part of it.
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KoKo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-20-12 06:19 PM
Response to Reply #2
4. And some of this goes back to ENGLISH LAW...Magna Carta...and the
Edited on Fri Apr-20-12 06:26 PM by KoKo
then going to the Foundations of America... But, law that was taken from snips of Grecko/Romans Law into our Constitution..

And it's ALL BEING UNDONE. Just like Karl Rove predicted.

THEY RULE!

--------------------------

I KNOW IT's WIKI and there are BETTER MORE HISTORICAL SOURCES...but HERE:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magna_Carta

Magna Carta, also called Magna Carta Libertatum, is an English charter, originally issued in the year 1215 and reissued later in the 13th century in modified versions. The later versions excluded the most direct challenges to the monarch's authority that had been present in the 1215 charter. The charter first passed into law in 1225; the 1297 version, with the long title (originally in Latin) The Great Charter of the Liberties of England, and of the Liberties of the Forest, still remains on the statute books of England and Wales.

The 1215 charter required King John of England to proclaim certain liberties, and accept that his will was not arbitrary, for example by explicitly accepting that no "freeman" (in the sense of non-serf) could be punished except through the law of the land, a right which is still in existence today.

Magna Carta was the first document forced onto an English King by a group of his subjects, the feudal barons, in an attempt to limit his powers by law and protect their privileges. It was preceded and directly influenced by the Charter of Liberties in 1100, in which King Henry I had specified particular areas wherein his powers would be limited.

Despite its recognised importance, by the second half of the 19th century nearly all of its clauses had been repealed in their original form. Three clauses remain part of the law of England and Wales, however, and it is generally considered part of the uncodified constitution. Lord Denning described it as "the greatest constitutional document of all times the foundation of the freedom of the individual against the arbitrary authority of the despot".<1> In a 2005 speech, Lord Woolf described it as "first of a series of instruments that now are recognised as having a special constitutional status",<2> the others being the Habeas Corpus Act (1679), the Petition of Right (1628), the Bill of Rights (1689), and the Act of Settlement (1701).


The charter was an important part of the extensive historical process that led to the rule of constitutional law in the English speaking world, and it was Magna Carta (rather than other early concessions by the monarch) which survived to become a "sacred text".<3> In practice, Magna Carta in the medieval period did not in general limit the power of kings, but by the time of the English Civil War it had become an important symbol for those who wished to show that the King was bound by the law. It influenced the early settlers in New England<4> and inspired later constitutional documents, including the United States Constitution.<5>

Magna Carta, also called Magna Carta Libertatum, is an English charter, originally issued in the year 1215 and reissued later in the 13th century in modified versions. The later versions excluded the most direct challenges to the monarch's authority that had been present in the 1215 charter. The charter first passed into law in 1225; the 1297 version, with the long title (originally in Latin) The Great Charter of the Liberties of England, and of the Liberties of the Forest, still remains on the statute books of England and Wales.

The 1215 charter required King John of England to proclaim certain liberties, and accept that his will was not arbitrary, for example by explicitly accepting that no "freeman" (in the sense of non-serf) could be punished except through the law of the land, a right which is still in existence today.

Magna Carta was the first document forced onto an English King by a group of his subjects, the feudal barons, in an attempt to limit his powers by law and protect their privileges. It was preceded and directly influenced by the Charter of Liberties in 1100, in which King Henry I had specified particular areas wherein his powers would be limited.

Despite its recognised importance, by the second half of the 19th century nearly all of its clauses had been repealed in their original form. Three clauses remain part of the law of England and Wales, however, and it is generally considered part of the uncodified constitution. Lord Denning described it as "the greatest constitutional document of all times the foundation of the freedom of the individual against the arbitrary authority of the despot".<1> In a 2005 speech, Lord Woolf described it as "first of a series of instruments that now are recognised as having a special constitutional status",<2> the others being the Habeas Corpus Act (1679), the Petition of Right (1628), the Bill of Rights (1689), and the Act of Settlement (1701).


The charter was an important part of the extensive historical process that led to the rule of constitutional law in the English speaking world, and it was Magna Carta (rather than other early concessions by the monarch) which survived to become a "sacred text".<3> In practice, Magna Carta in the medieval period did not in general limit the power of kings, but by the time of the English Civil War it had become an important symbol for those who wished to show that the King was bound by the law. It influenced the early settlers in New England<4> and inspired later constitutional documents, including the United States Constitution.<5>





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KoKo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Apr-20-12 06:32 PM
Response to Reply #4
5. KARL ROVE QUOTE: "We're an empire now, and when we act, we create our own reality."
Reality-based community
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Reality-based community isKARL ROVE QUOTE: "Reality Based Community" ...Famous Quote about We WRITE HISTORY an informal term in the United States. In the fall of 2004, the phrase "proud member of the reality-based community" was first used to suggest the commentator's opinions are based more on observation than on faith, assumption, or ideology. The term has been defined as people who "believe that solutions emerge from judicious study of discernible reality." Some commentators have gone as far as to suggest that there is an overarching conflict in society between the reality-based community and the "faith-based community" as a whole. It can be seen as an example of political framing.

The source of the term is a quotation in an October 17, 2004, The New York Times Magazine article by writer Ron Suskind, quoting an unnamed aide to George W. Bush (later attributed to Karl Rove<1>):

The aide said that guys like me were "in what we call the reality-based community," which he defined as people who "believe that solutions emerge from your judicious study of discernible reality." ... "That's not the way the world really works anymore," he continued. "We're an empire now, and when we act, we create our own reality. And while you're studying that realityjudiciously, as you willwe'll act again, creating other new realities, which you can study too, and that's how things will sort out. We're history's actorsand you, all of you, will be left to just study what we do."<2>


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reality-based_community
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