Democratic Underground Latest Greatest Lobby Journals Search Options Help Login
Google

Murder.

Printer-friendly format Printer-friendly format
Printer-friendly format Email this thread to a friend
Printer-friendly format Bookmark this thread
This topic is archived.
Home » Discuss » General Discussion Donate to DU
 
Fire Walk With Me Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-08-11 04:36 PM
Original message
Murder.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
aquart Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-08-11 04:37 PM
Response to Original message
1. Yes.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Dover Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-08-11 04:39 PM
Response to Original message
2. Thanks for this. Chris connected the dots that weren't being connected..n/t
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
UnrepentantLiberal Donating Member (747 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 01:48 PM
Response to Reply #2
30. Let's connect more dots (in Haiti) ---> BIG TIME MURDER
Edited on Wed Nov-09-11 01:50 PM by UnrepentantLiberal
Angry yet? Children in Haiti eat dirt to put something in their stomachs. Aren't "free markets" wonderful?

(Edit... I don't think this website will mind me using more than four paragraphs.)

http://www.margueritelaurent.com/pressclips/foodcrisis....

30 Years Ago Haiti Grew All the Rice It Needed. What Happened?

By Bill Quigley
HLNS News
April 21, 2008

Riots in Haiti over explosive rises in food costs have claimed the lives of six people. There have also been food riots world-wide in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cote dIvorie, Egypt, Guinea, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Senegal, Uzbekistan and Yemen.

The Economist, which calls the current crisis the silent tsunami, reports that last year wheat prices rose 77% and rice 16%, but since January rice prices have risen 141%. The reasons include rising fuel costs, weather problems, increased demand in China and India, as well as the push to create biofuels from cereal crops.

Hermite Joseph, a mother working in the markets of Port au Prince, told journalist Nick Whalen that her two kids are like toothpicks they re not getting enough nourishment. Before, if you had a dollar twenty-five cents, you could buy vegetables, some rice, 10 cents of charcoal and a little cooking oil. Right now, a little can of rice alone costs 65 cents, and is not good rice at all. Oil is 25 cents. Charcoal is 25 cents. With a dollar twenty-five, you cant even make a plate of rice for one child.

The St. Claires Church Food program, in the Tiplas Kazo neighborhood of Port au Prince, serves 1000 free meals a day, almost all to hungry children -- five times a week in partnership with the What If Foundation. Children from Cite Soleil have been known to walk the five miles to the church for a meal. The cost of rice, beans, vegetables, a little meat, spices, cooking oil, propane for the stoves, have gone up dramatically. Because of the rise in the cost of food, the portions are now smaller. But hunger is on the rise and more and more children come for the free meal. Hungry adults used to be allowed to eat the leftovers once all the children were fed, but now there are few leftovers.

The New York Times lectured Haiti on April 18 that Haiti, its agriculture industry in shambles, needs to better feed itself. Unfortunately, the article did not talk at all about one of the main causes of the shortages -- the fact that the U.S. and other international financial bodies destroyed Haitian rice farmers to create a major market for the heavily subsidized rice from U.S. farmers. This is not the only cause of hunger in Haiti and other poor countries, but it is a major force.

Thirty years ago, Haiti raised nearly all the rice it needed. What happened?

In 1986, after the expulsion of Haitian dictator Jean Claude Baby Doc Duvalier the International Monetary Fund (IMF) loaned Haiti $24.6 million in desperately needed funds (Baby Doc had raided the treasury on the way out). But, in order to get the IMF loan, Haiti was required to reduce tariff protections for their Haitian rice and other agricultural products and some industries to open up the countrys markets to competition from outside countries. The U.S. has by far the largest voice in decisions of the IMF.

Doctor Paul Farmer was in Haiti then and saw what happened. Within less than two years, it became impossible for Haitian farmers to compete with what they called Miami rice. The whole local rice market in Haiti fell apart as cheap, U.S. subsidized rice, some of it in the form of food aid, flooded the market. There was violence, rice wars, and lives were lost.

American rice invaded the country, recalled Charles Suffrard, a leading rice grower in Haiti in an interview with the Washington Post in 2000. By 1987 and 1988, there was so much rice coming into the country that many stopped working the land.

Fr. Gerard Jean-Juste, a Haitian priest who has been the pastor at St. Claire and an outspoken human rights advocate, agrees. In the 1980s, imported rice poured into Haiti, below the cost of what our farmers could produce it. Farmers lost their businesses. People from the countryside started losing their jobs and moving to the cities. After a few years of cheap imported rice, local production went way down.

Still the international business community was not satisfied. In 1994, as a condition for U.S. assistance in returning to Haiti to resume his elected Presidency, Jean-Bertrand Aristide was forced by the U.S., the IMF, and the World Bank to open up the markets in Haiti even more.

But, Haiti is the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, what reason could the U.S. have in destroying the rice market of this tiny country?

Haiti is definitely poor. The U.S. Agency for International Development reports the annual per capita income is less than $400. The United Nations reports life expectancy in Haiti is 59, while in the US it is 78. Over 78% of Haitians live on less than $2 a day, more than half live on less than $1 a day.

Yet Haiti has become one of the very top importers of rice from the U.S. The U.S. Department of Agriculture 2008 numbers show Haiti is the third largest importer of US rice - at over 240,000 metric tons of rice. (One metric ton is 2200 pounds).

Rice is a heavily subsidized business in the U.S. Rice subsidies in the U.S. totaled $11 billion from 1995 to 2006. One producer alone, Riceland Foods Inc of Stuttgart Arkansas, received over $500 million dollars in rice subsidies between 1995 and 2006.

The Cato Institute recently reported that rice is one of the most heavily supported commodities in the U.S. -- with three different subsidies together averaging over $1 billion a year since 1998 and projected to average over $700 million a year through 2015. The result? Tens of millions of rice farmers in poor countries find it hard to lift their families out of poverty because of the lower, more volatile prices caused by the interventionist policies of other countries.

In addition to three different subsidies for rice farmers in the U.S., there are also direct tariff barriers of 3 to 24 percent, reports Daniel Griswold of the Cato Institute -- the exact same type of protections, though much higher, that the U.S. and the IMF required Haiti to eliminate in the 1980s and 1990s.

U.S. protection for rice farmers goes even further. A 2006 story in the Washington Post found that the federal government has paid at least $1.3 billion in subsidies for rice and other crops since 2000 to individuals who do no farming at all; including $490,000 to a Houston surgeon who owned land near Houston that once grew rice.

And it is not only the Haitian rice farmers who have been hurt.

Paul Farmer saw it happen to the sugar growers as well. Haiti, once the world's largest exporter of sugar and other tropical produce to Europe, began importing even sugar-- from U.S. controlled sugar production in the Dominican Republic and Florida. It was terrible to see Haitian farmers put out of work. All this sped up the downward spiral that led to this month's food riots.

After the riots and protests, President Rene Preval of Haiti agreed to reduce the price of rice, which was selling for $51 for a 110 pound bag, to $43 dollars for the next month. No one thinks a one month fix will do anything but delay the severe hunger pains a few weeks.

Haiti is far from alone in this crisis. The Economist reports a billion people worldwide live on $1 a day. The US-backed Voice of America reports about 850 million people were suffering from hunger worldwide before the latest round of price increases.

Thirty three countries are at risk of social upheaval because of rising food prices, World Bank President Robert Zoellick told the Wall Street Journal. When countries have many people who spend half to three-quarters of their daily income on food, there is no margin of survival.

-snip-
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
CanSocDem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 02:54 PM
Response to Reply #30
35. Thank you for expanding the story.


It's what we get for supporting bought and paid for politicians.

.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
robinlynne Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-08-11 04:39 PM
Response to Original message
3. k&r and wow.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Uncle Joe Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-08-11 04:39 PM
Response to Original message
4. Kicked and recommended.
Thanks for the thread, Fire Walk With Me.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
sabrina 1 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-08-11 04:40 PM
Response to Original message
5. Criminals, and so many of them in positions of power in our
government.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Vincardog Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-08-11 04:40 PM
Response to Original message
6. Until the commodities futures can be traded so the cost decreases they should be illegal
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
GliderGuider Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-08-11 04:47 PM
Response to Reply #6
7. .
Edited on Tue Nov-08-11 04:49 PM by GliderGuider
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
GliderGuider Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-08-11 04:49 PM
Response to Original message
8. Murderers.


~Photo by James Nachtwey
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
nineteen50 Donating Member (488 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 12:56 PM
Response to Reply #8
24. This is the result of the inequality of economics
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Jamastiene Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-08-11 04:50 PM
Response to Original message
9. K&R
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
PETRUS Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-08-11 05:34 PM
Response to Original message
10. K&R - the truth is getting harder to contain.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Hydra Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-08-11 06:40 PM
Response to Original message
11. Remember how greed and selfishness are supposed to be Holy?
This is the cost.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Fire Walk With Me Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-08-11 06:47 PM
Response to Original message
12. Did middlemen gain when onions touched Rs70-80/kg?
Onion prices have more than doubled in the past year, touching a peak of Rs75-80/kg. This prompted us to explore the drivers of this phenomenon and get a better sense of the ground realities.

In December, the price of onions at Lasalgaon touched Rs60/kg as (albeit very briefly, as the average price of red onions was Rs20/kg in December). When prices hit Rs60/kg at the farmers level, the retailer was forced to sell at Rs70-80/kg to retain his profit levels.

We believe hoarding, if at all, would have occurred at this time. When prices of onions stablised at about Rs20/kg, middlemen/retailers could have gained by holding on to the same prices in the pretext of high input prices. However, in the absence of concrete data, this remains a hypothesis.

http://www.dnaindia.com/money/report_why-are-onions-so-...
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
TBF Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-08-11 07:55 PM
Response to Original message
13. Excellent. K&R nt
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Nye Bevan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-08-11 08:36 PM
Response to Original message
14. Corn ethanol is also a big culprit.
The study said that "...large increases in biofuels production in the United States and Europe are the main reason behind the steep rise in global food prices."

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethanol_fuel_in_the_Unit...
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
WillyT Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-08-11 08:37 PM
Response to Original message
15. HUGE K & R !!! - Thank You !!!
:kick:
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
lunatica Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-08-11 08:40 PM
Response to Original message
16. The worship of money and power is a definite killer
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
HCE SuiGeneris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 12:37 AM
Response to Original message
17. Recommended
:grr: :kick:
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Enthusiast Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 06:04 AM
Response to Original message
18. That is some good stuff.....nt
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
BlancheSplanchnik Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 09:01 AM
Response to Original message
19. I kind of think Chris Hedges is a national treasure.
I was not aware of the ramifications.

:cry:
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
mmonk Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 09:05 AM
Response to Original message
20. Recommended.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
femrap Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 10:15 AM
Response to Original message
21. Let the 1%
EAT THEIR GREEN PAPER AND CHOKE ON IT.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Plucketeer Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 12:36 PM
Response to Original message
22. A new age way of warfare
without ever firing one shot!
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Starry Messenger Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 12:37 PM
Response to Original message
23. k&r
Imperialism=Death
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
woo me with science Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 01:01 PM
Response to Original message
25. Huge K&R . Thank you. nt
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Initech Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 01:17 PM
Response to Original message
26. If corporations are people now let's arrest Goldman Sachs and prosecute them for murder.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
DeSwiss Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 01:19 PM
Response to Original message
27. That is precisely what it is......
...and murderers is what they are.

1% = Murderer

- K&R
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
AllyCat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 01:31 PM
Response to Original message
28. Starving little children and others who have no means to help themselves
Murder and I would add torture to that. These people are criminals and all should be put away. Free market my a$$
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
russspeakeasy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 01:39 PM
Response to Original message
29. This has been going on for years. I'm glad it's being talked about.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Fumesucker Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 01:50 PM
Response to Original message
31. K&R
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
VWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 01:55 PM
Response to Original message
32. And here I thought
they hated us for our freeedoms. Silly me.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Firebrand Gary Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 02:01 PM
Response to Original message
33. It's the ENRON scandal of food.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Beavker Donating Member (784 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 02:44 PM
Response to Original message
34. Where are the Churches?
If they were really trying to feed the poor, they should realize who is making their job so difficult? Where are the Bible thumping sheep that pour into the church everyday in their SUV's, 5 fat kids, and sit there and listen to the priest tell them that the poor are God's children and Jesus tells you not to judge, just help.

I've sat in the pew and looked around while a priest basically told these assholes to give to the poor, help them, provide for them without question.

Yet they go the polls and vote for people that promote murder. Those dollar bills given in the collection plate isn't doing even a fraction of what your Tea Bagging Senator could do if they didn't work for Wall Street.

Time to put the commodity prices back in the hands of he farmers and the folks that need the goods. Goldman doesn't need to buy futures on a million barrells of oil. United does. They use it.

Start making delivery on these goods. Goldman can buy some storage facilities to house the million bushels of rice it is hoarding on paper. Then we can disclose the location of these facilities.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Kurmudgeon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 04:42 PM
Response to Reply #34
41. Nice try at changing the subject, Beavker. If Goldman Sachs go to church, it's to feed their ego.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Cali_Democrat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 03:37 PM
Response to Original message
36. This is what I said about the Fed's Quantitative Easing policy.
When the Fed buys those bonds on the open market, the money flows to investment firms like Goldman Sachs and they use that cash to buy commodities, driving up the prices. They're looking for a high rate of return on risk assets while interests rates are near zero.

Look what happened to the prices of commodities after it became clear the Fed was going to pursue QE2. Commodity prices surged in a big way.

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Admiral Loinpresser Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 03:42 PM
Response to Original message
37. And let's not forget climate change.
The leading cause of infant mortality among oppressed/developing nations is diarrhea. As the planet warms those deaths increase. Another way Obama has blood on his hands, in view of his sellout in Copenhagen in 2009. In 2010, global carbon emissions skyrocketed.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
OwnedByFerrets Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 04:27 PM
Response to Original message
38. Who cares....I got mine
:sarcasm:
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
lonestarnot Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 04:28 PM
Response to Original message
39. Serial killers!
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
lutefisk Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 04:32 PM
Response to Original message
40. The predator class doesn't see murder as a bad thing. It's part of "winning"...nt
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
DU AdBot (1000+ posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view 
this author's profile Click to add 
this author to your buddy list Click to add 
this author to your Ignore list Tue Sep 23rd 2014, 01:25 PM
Response to Original message
Advertisements [?]
 Top

Home » Discuss » General Discussion Donate to DU

Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.1 Copyright 1997-2002 DCScripts.com
Software has been extensively modified by the DU administrators


Important Notices: By participating on this discussion board, visitors agree to abide by the rules outlined on our Rules page. Messages posted on the Democratic Underground Discussion Forums are the opinions of the individuals who post them, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Democratic Underground, LLC.

Home  |  Discussion Forums  |  Journals |  Store  |  Donate

About DU  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

Got a message for Democratic Underground? Click here to send us a message.

© 2001 - 2011 Democratic Underground, LLC