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Most vertebrates -- including humans -- descended from ancestor with sixth sense

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The Straight Story Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-11-11 07:45 PM
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Most vertebrates -- including humans -- descended from ancestor with sixth sense
Most vertebrates -- including humans -- descended from ancestor with sixth sense

A study in the Oct. 11 issue of Nature Communications that caps more than 25 years of work finds that the vast majority of vertebrates some 30,000 species of land animals (including humans) and a roughly equal number of ray-finned fishes descended from a common ancestor that had a well-developed electroreceptive system.

This ancestor was probably a predatory marine fish with good eyesight, jaws and teeth and a lateral line system for detecting water movements, visible as a stripe along the flank of most fishes. It lived around 500 million years ago. The vast majority of the approximately 65,000 living vertebrate species are its descendants.

"This study caps questions in developmental and evolutionary biology, popularly called 'evo-devo,' that I've been interested in for 35 years," said Willy Bemis, Cornell professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and a senior author of the paper. Melinda Modrell, a neuroscientist at the University of Cambridge who did the molecular analysis, is the paper's lead author.

Hundreds of millions of years ago, there was a major split in the evolutionary tree of vertebrates. One lineage led to the ray-finned fishes, or actinopterygians, and the other to lobe-finned fishes, or sarcopterygians; the latter gave rise to land vertebrates, Bemis explained. Some land vertebrates, including such salamanders as the Mexican axolotl, have electroreception and, until now, offered the best-studied model for early development of this sensory system. As part of changes related to terrestrial life, the lineage leading to reptiles, birds and mammals lost electrosense as well as the lateral line.

http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-10-vertebrates-humans-...
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mike_c Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-11-11 08:36 PM
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1. that electrosense-- e.g. ampullae of Lorenzini...
...isn't much use in terrestrial habitats as air is not a good conductor of electricity. It's easy to imagine why those receptors were selected against in land dwelling vertebrates.
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