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A list I made during the TWO WEEKS that I was without electricity after Hurricane Ike hit Texas

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Tx4obama Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-25-11 11:38 PM
Original message
A list I made during the TWO WEEKS that I was without electricity after Hurricane Ike hit Texas
Edited on Fri Aug-26-11 12:26 AM by Tx4obama

Things to do BEFORE the hurricane hits and before the electricity goes out:

Turn on the dishwasher so that everything in the house is clean.

Be sure to wash all the laundry: clothes, sheets, towels.

Freeze as much water in jugs and containers that you can, the extra ice will help to keep your freezer/fridge colder longer.

Fill up your car(s)/truck(s) with gasoline, and a couple of 5 gallon gas cans (if you have somewhere safe to store them).

If you have a gas grill make sure the propane tank is full, and having an extra spare full tank is a good idea.
Most kitchen stoves/ovens down here in Texas are electric, so having an outdoor grill comes in handy. If you have a couple of cast iron skillets many things can be made on the grill other than the usual burgers, etc. such as eggs/bacon, pancakes, and many other things that can be made in the frying pan.

Gather up all the useful things that you can think of that you'll need, such as:

Lots of extra extension cords and a power strip - if you have a generator.
At least two ice chests/coolers to store ice and food in.
Cases of bottled water, jugs of soda.
A couple boxes of powdered/dry milk, cereal, pancake mix (the kind that says 'just add water'), anything you can think of that doesn't need refrigeration.
Fruit: Apples, bananas, pears, any kind that can be left out at room temperature. Also, dried fruit is a good option.
Canned food such as: chili, stew, soup, etc.
A manual can opener.
Battery operated radio, and tons of BATTERIES.
Candles and/or battery operated lights.
Lighters and matches.
Mosquito spray.
Books, crossword puzzles, and other things that will help keep your mind off of the fact the electricity is off during the daytime.
Make sure you have your prescription drugs filled ahead of time, and also gather up other items usually found in a first-aide kit - such as ibuprofen, band-aids, hydrogen peroxide, alcohol, gauze ...
Extra dog/cat food if you have pets.
If your house/apartment is missing any window screens - get a roll or two of screen wire and a big roll of duct tape. The screen wire can be cut with scissors a bit larger than the window and duct taped to the opening. It really helps when it's hot and the AC is not working - and it keeps the bugs out.
Yard bags, a rake, and a chain saw if you have trees.

Edited to add:
FLASHLIGHTS (can't believe I left that one off h/t to the person in the comments that posted that reminder!)
Instant Coffee (thanks to the DUer down below in the comments!)

Note: I am sure that a hundred things are missing from my list, but I hope that at least one person finds something on the list that is helpful.


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hedgehog Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-25-11 11:40 PM
Response to Original message
1. Thank you - I know how to prepare for a snow storm, but i never
Edited on Thu Aug-25-11 11:42 PM by hedgehog
expected to be watching hurricane warnings!

Edit: Just forwarded your list to family closer to the coast. We're likely to only get 40mph winds here, but they're in the path.


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FourScore Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:29 PM
Response to Reply #1
51. AND DON'T FORGET TO CHARGE YOUR CELL PHONES!!!
Edited on Fri Aug-26-11 12:30 PM by FourScore
Sometimes, it's the little things that go unnoticed...

Great list!
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Betty88 Donating Member (437 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 03:44 PM
Response to Reply #51
60. Saving my computers UPS battery back up for this
I have a UPS with battery backup on two of our computers. If we loose power I will unplug everything from them and use them to charge the cell phones, I'm not sure how long this will last but I figure I should get several charges out of each UPS. If I'm wrong please let me know LOL
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w0nderer Donating Member (430 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 03:51 PM
Response to Reply #60
61. even a small 300 watt ups
will give a lot of chargers

the battery of my cell is 5.6 Wh

even counting that at 10 watts (losses to charger, battery loosing a little charge)
you'll get close to 30 charges

notice most ups's actually give in VA
but if you know the watt storage of it that's a rough guide line

va is a little more fiddly to calculate but
i just count batteries and what sort of batteries
2 batteries of 12 volts and 10 amp/hours
12*10*2
120*2
240 watts
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Betty88 Donating Member (437 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 04:24 PM
Response to Reply #61
69. COOL thanks for the confimation
That makes me feel much better
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w0nderer Donating Member (430 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 04:27 PM
Response to Reply #69
71. i actually used that trick too during a few hurricanes
and posted it earlier this morning

glad to see more people thinking outside the box

the one price you might pay is
run it down hard and it will affect life time of batteries negatively
ie, replace them sooner

they are consumables anyway and i value communication as a higher priority
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NOLALady Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 05:22 PM
Response to Reply #51
79. Charged cell phones will not work
if the towers are down.
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calimary Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 07:08 PM
Response to Reply #51
81. Can't tell you how important this one single point is!!!
CHARGE YOUR CELL PHONES WHILE YOU CAN!!!

And charge ANYTHING else you want to have powered for the longest possible time during an emergency. After the crisis has hit is no time to go find the charger so you can plug it in. It might be after dark and you won't be able to see, and there won't be power period. DO IT NOW. I do it every night just by habit, by now. That way I start every morning with a fully-charged phone (and laptop too).
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Rhiannon12866 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-25-11 11:40 PM
Response to Original message
2. K&R and bookmarking!
With thanks from New York! :yourock:
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hedgehog Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-25-11 11:46 PM
Response to Original message
3. And put that generator some place where the exhaust doesn't fill the house!
Also, try not to electrocute your linesman when he's restoring power to your neighborhood.
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X_Digger Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 10:37 AM
Response to Reply #3
48. And lock your generator down.
Heavy chain through it to a post / pole that can't be cut easily.
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GreenPartyVoter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-25-11 11:46 PM
Response to Original message
4. Great list! I'm also washing my people before the storm gets here.
Edited on Thu Aug-25-11 11:47 PM by GreenPartyVoter
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Ruby the Liberal Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-25-11 11:56 PM
Response to Reply #4
9. "I'm also washing my people"? Eh?
Here I thought burying eggs in salt was the tip of the day.

:D
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GreenPartyVoter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:02 AM
Response to Reply #9
15. LOL Well, I figure if we're going to be stuck in a warm house for a while, it would be nice if we
started out clean anyway. :P
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Ruby the Liberal Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:16 AM
Response to Reply #15
24. !
:rofl:
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gkhouston Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:54 AM
Response to Reply #15
39. True dat. Our saving grace after Ike was that we still had running water.
Edited on Fri Aug-26-11 12:54 AM by gkhouston
Oh, those showers felt good.
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msanthrope Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 04:01 PM
Response to Reply #9
66. I love that tip!!! I'm so using it at my shore house. That is, if I still have a shore house.
I'm in Cape May. I'm hoping it's still there....

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Ruby the Liberal Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 05:25 PM
Response to Reply #66
80. I am very close to you. I see Mayor Nutter is closing off SEPTA Saturday night
Hopefully, we don't see much of anything out of this monster.

Stay safe!
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Curmudgeoness Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 09:03 PM
Response to Reply #4
87. All my neighbors laughed at me when I showered under a rainspout
before the rain stopped. When I realized I had no water, that was my first thought. Lucky for me, I had no water for eight days.
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Renew Deal Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-25-11 11:49 PM
Response to Original message
5. This is great.
Thanks!
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texanwitch Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-25-11 11:52 PM
Response to Original message
6. I look back at the two weeks of no power after Ike as a good time now.
Time just slowwwwwed down.

No gas and no wheres to go.

Just sit around with neighbors and talk.

Driving was fun, no signal lights.

Going to Krogers and shopping in the almost dark.

Your list is very good.

I would include solar lights, mine came in handy after Ike.

The solar lights are battery chargers for AA batteries.

I found a pancake mix that only needs water, no egss or milk.

Also you need 2 gallon zip lock bags, you can make a cooling pillow with ice for behind you neck.



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Tx4obama Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:14 AM
Response to Reply #6
23. The zip lock bag/ice pillow tip is great, thanks!

I'm adding it to my list that I keep on the front of the fridge.

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texanwitch Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:32 AM
Response to Reply #23
28. It really works.
I was sitting on the front porch after Ike doing guard duty for the block and it was so hot.

Humid and sticky Houston weather.

I remembered a commerial about a device that was sold on tv that went around the neck.

I think it was sold by Sharper Image.

I grabbed a two gallon bag and filled it with ice and water from my little cooler.

I placed it behind my neck and the air in the bag made a nice pillow.

After a few minutes I started to cool off, saved my butt.

It really did work.
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Tx4obama Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:49 AM
Response to Reply #28
35. I was using one of those thin white cotton flour sack kitchen towels that you can find at Wal-Mart
Edited on Fri Aug-26-11 12:50 AM by Tx4obama

(they sell them in a 5-pack) soaked in water around my neck.
It wasn't very cold but it did help to stay cool - well not really 'cool', but 'cooler' ;)

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texanwitch Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:52 AM
Response to Reply #35
38. This ice pillow works really fast.
It cools down you blood so your body cools off.

Could save someones life from a heat stroke.
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ChazII Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 03:53 PM
Response to Reply #38
63. Agree 100%. I use the small bottle
of Gatorade filled with water. Place a few in the freezer and keep them on hand in case we lose power. Luckily, being a desert rat we do not have to worry about hurricanes but we do have the occasional power outages and having the ice helps keep the body temp in check.

Thanks to everyone who is giving tips - they're great.
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AlbertCat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 02:15 PM
Response to Reply #23
56. The zip lock bag/ice pillow tip is great, thanks!
We bought a frozen turkey and kept it in the freezer to help keep it cold when the power goes out (as it usually does). Then after it was thawed, we cooked it and eat it. But we've never been without power for 2 weeks.... not even after Fran. (which went right over our heads here in Wilmington, NC)
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texanwitch Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 03:21 PM
Response to Reply #56
59. I am better prepared now.
I really don't want to go without power again for two weeks, not when it is still hot.

The best thing I had was the solar lights, they charge AA batteries.

I listened to a lot of books on cd I had.

Nothing like sitting in the pitch dark except for a bug candle and flashlight listening to Stephen King.

One night this damn cat of mind scared the hell out of me.

It touch me on the leg, Stephen King is scary in the dark.
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Honeycombe8 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 03:53 PM
Response to Reply #6
62. Solar lights...like the kind you stick in your yard? nt
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texanwitch Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 04:04 PM
Response to Reply #62
67. Yep.
Some are brighter then others.

This is a good time of year to buy them, I bought a bunch last year for 50 percent off.

The LED ones are the brighest.

You extra batteries to go with the lights.

I have tall ones, short ones and some that are attached to the walls.

Remember,no power no lights.

It was pitch black here after Ike, solar lights made a difference.
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Honeycombe8 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 04:36 PM
Response to Reply #67
73. Thanks. I'm hearing to discount store after work (I don't have an emergency coming....
but I want to get some on sale, since they're good to have around).
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texanwitch Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 04:41 PM
Response to Reply #73
74. Watch out you will get hooked.
I have muti- colored ones, butter fly, birds, and sunflower solar lights.

I don't like to look in catalogs anymore, solar lights are everywhere.

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nickyt Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 05:05 PM
Response to Reply #6
77. pancake mix, needs water only: Hungry Jack! n/t
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wizstars Donating Member (792 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 07:19 PM
Response to Reply #6
82. after breaking my foot years ago, I've kept a water-soaked bandanna in the freezer....
in a zip-lock bag to use for injuries--but it also works great for cooling down! Keep one handy!
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proud patriot Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 09:57 PM
Response to Reply #82
94. we do that with sponges at the preschool where I work for boo boos
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wizstars Donating Member (792 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Aug-27-11 11:54 AM
Response to Reply #6
98. A lot of camping equipment stores now carry a fold-up solar panel
for recharging small batteries eg cell-phone, camera, flashlight...
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hedgehog Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-25-11 11:52 PM
Response to Original message
7. Also, now is not the time to learn how to use a chainsaw.
My kids still talk about watching my parent's neighbor after an ice storm: standing on top of a step ladder, reaching out with the chain saw to cut a broken tree limb.


Someone else suggested having heavy gloves and boots for cleaning up after the storm.
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gkhouston Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:49 AM
Response to Reply #7
34. You'd be surprised at how much you can do with lopping shears.
We have some with extendable handles. Our chainsaw is electric, so it didn't get used for quite a while, but almost all of the tree debris in the yard was amenable to being hacked up with lopping shears. We didn't think that would be the case, at first, but decided to trim away as much as we could. We ended up with enough stuff neatly stacked along the front easement of our property that it looked like we had a hedge, and two 7' sections of tree branch that got sawed up later on.

And rakes are a Good Thing, too. The first job after the storm had passed and we'd checked on our nearby neighbors was to rake the leaf litter out of the gutter so the street would drain.
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PoliticAverse Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-25-11 11:56 PM
Response to Original message
8. Store lots of water!
Fill the bathtub if you have to.
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democrat2thecore Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:13 AM
Response to Reply #8
22. Absolutely. Can't have enough. nobody laugh at the bathtub - saved me in FL in the 70's once. -nt
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w0nderer Donating Member (430 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 03:55 PM
Response to Reply #22
64. trash can too
instead of just leaving it around or taking it indoors
double layer it with large contractor bags
drop some chlorine in there and fill it with water from the garden hose
and tie off the bags

makes sure it doesn't move TOO much
and saves some water, for squeamish use it to flush
for everyone else, it's drinkable
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gkhouston Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:51 AM
Response to Reply #8
37. Fill it even if you don't think you have to. I've done this many times,
and if I was unsure about how good the tub stopper was, I'd duct-tape some plastic over the drain before filling the tub.
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RebelOne Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:33 PM
Response to Reply #37
52. You will need that water to flush the toilet. n/t
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Kevin Cloyd Donating Member (104 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 03:11 PM
Response to Reply #37
58. Bucket Flushing Toilets!!
If you are on a well or there's no running water you'll need lots of extra water to "bucket flush" the toilet.

For an older 3.5 gallon per flush toilet fill a 5 gallon bucket 2/3 full and dump it quickly (but don't overflow the toilet) into the bowl and it will flush away the waste. Newer toilets will use a little less than half a five gallon bucket of water per flush and may need to be flushed twice to clean the bowl since most have water pressure assisted flush cycles.

A few years ago after an ice storm I had to carry water in from a creek to flush the toilets and I sure wish I'd have filled the tub.
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Tallulah Donating Member (127 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-25-11 11:56 PM
Response to Original message
10. 3 to 5 weeks without power
after Andrew.

Saying 3 days of food is not enough. You need more than that.

Something no one thinks about, dry ice. I lost nothing in my refrigerator because my BIL brought me dry ice daily. It kept everything cold. We did cook all the meat we had. I didn't want to throw it out. Better than losing it.

Another thing, when Katrina hit, I had a cable landline phone. I could call out but no one could call in. Check that if you have the cable package. It was strange.

In every hurricane I've been through, we had water and natural gas. I washed clothes in my bathtub and made a clothesline in my laundry room. You do what you gotta do. Have a piece of rope handy just in case.

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texanwitch Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-25-11 11:59 PM
Response to Reply #10
12. You can wash clothes in a 5 gallon bucket.
Clothes lines are easy to put up, just remember to buy clothes pins.
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TheMadMonk Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 01:36 AM
Response to Reply #12
44. A container with a solid screw top lid makes a very good washing machine.
Left to roll around in a car trunk, or manually kicked around the yard by a couple of kids.

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pnorman Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 02:28 AM
Response to Reply #12
46. "You can wash clothes in a 5 gallon bucket."
This works perfecto with such a bucket!
Rapid Washer - DIY Manual Hand Washing Machine
http://www.amazon.com/Rapid-Washer-Manual-Washing-Machi...

With a surprising low amount of physical effort, clothes can be washed as well as by machine, and using far less water. You'll also find yourself using it frequently, even in non-emergency situations.
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FedUpWithIt All Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 10:34 AM
Response to Reply #46
47. A dollar store toilet plunger works nearly as well in a pinch
You simply place to clothes in the water and agitate the load with the plunger.
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pnorman Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 11:44 AM
Response to Reply #47
50. That should work satisfactorially (sorta)
But this will do the job far better. Trust me!


Visualize the complex water flow patterns through it as you plunge it up and down several times. I was startled at how dark the water soon turned, although the clothes were worn only in the apartment. Also, read through all the Amazon reviews. For me, the only pain in the ass was hand-wringing jeans. But just draping them (still dripping) over the shower curtain for just a few hours longer did the trick.

Full disclosure: I live alone in a downtown Seattle apartment, and that device has been my sole "washing machine" for the past 3 or 4 years. That included sheets, towels, as well as down jackets.
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FedUpWithIt All Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:45 PM
Response to Reply #50
53. A mop wringer works really good for wringing large and heavy items.
I've been hand washing a portion of my family's clothes for a couple of years. We've just used the basic plunger, a mop wringer and a 1918 hand crank roller wringer. I do think the Rapid Washer works better and they sell them at Lehmanns but i've also heard that drilling holes into the rubber part of a plunger has a similar affect. :)

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JDPriestly Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 04:46 PM
Response to Reply #53
75. These washing instructions remind me of the old tub washer (manual of course)
that my grandmother used. It works quite well. Think of it. They washed white cotton garments with a method very much like the plunger, wringer method being described here.
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wizstars Donating Member (792 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Aug-27-11 11:47 AM
Response to Reply #12
97. a 5-gal. bucket w/ a lid, and a bathroom plumber's helper
through a hole in the lid for an agitator--great easy way to do laundry! It really works!!
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Ruby the Liberal Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:00 AM
Response to Reply #10
13. Someone else here reported the same issue after Andrew ('92)
Could make outbound calls, but not receive.

After the EQ Tuesday, I was unable to use text on my cell for several hours.
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hedgehog Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-25-11 11:57 PM
Response to Original message
11. How about a small home fire extinguisher?
It might also be a good time to introduce the kids to board games!
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JDPriestly Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 04:47 PM
Response to Reply #11
76. A few good jigsaw puzzles.
If you are a jigsaw puzzle fan, it is a good idea to trade puzzles with friends every once in a while. That way you don't have to keep storing puzzles you have already worked, and you can work a puzzle that is new and surprising without spending a fortune.
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democrat2thecore Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:01 AM
Response to Original message
14. And tuna, tuna, and more - tuna. Be careful w/ peanut butter in case water is in short supply -nt
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texanwitch Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:04 AM
Response to Reply #14
16. I always have canned meat on hand.
I have always had a gas stove so all I needed to do was light the burners.

Another thing is buy the bbq lighters, great for candles.
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SwampG8r Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:06 AM
Response to Reply #14
18. and dont forget
the takeout squeeze tubes of mayo,mustard and relish require no refridgeration and help make tuna more palatable
always get the squeeze containers of condiments they store forever and they are free at 7/11 as long as you get a taquito or something
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Tx4obama Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:10 AM
Response to Reply #14
21. Mayo/MiracleWhip that is in a jar MUST be refrigerated.
Edited on Fri Aug-26-11 12:11 AM by Tx4obama

Be sure if Mayo is being used for tuna or anything else it MUST be kept COLD in an ice chest if there is no electricity.
If it gets warm for too long of a time period THROW IT AWAY.

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politicat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 01:06 AM
Response to Reply #21
41. Not true for commercial mayo or miracle whip.
Mayo is highly acidic and is pasteurized. A closed container of commercial mayo can be left at room temp for months. The food poisoning issue in things like potato salad is the other food that is generally covered in mayo-bed sauces. The mayo emulsion creates an anaerobic environment that e. Coli loves. yes, e Coli likes potatoes -- lots of easily converted starch and highly absorbent.

In theory, other food contaminants in the mayo jar can be a breeding ground for food poisoning, but the acidity makes that unlikely.

However, the best solution, if one cannot give up mayo even in a disaster, is the squeezable mayo. Note that the squeeze bottles note quite clearly that no refrigeration is needed, before or after opening. When making salads with mayo in a low or no refrigeration situation, consume the food as soon as it is prepared and do not store it.

Homemade mayo is a completely different beast.
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w0nderer Donating Member (430 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 04:24 PM
Response to Reply #41
70. :-) good for killing off the mayo food poisoning myth, thanks n/t
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Tx4obama Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 07:46 PM
Response to Reply #41
85. It is always best to READ the LABEL. My jar of Miracle Whip says 'refridgerate after opening'.
I think that it's not worth taking the chance of getting sick.

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SheilaT Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 09:38 PM
Response to Reply #41
93. If the jar of mayonnaise has never been opened
it can be at room temperature forever. Once opened, if you don't refrigerate it spoils in a few hours. I know from personal experience.
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kestrel91316 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:06 AM
Response to Original message
17. Buy a box or two of powdered milk. Don't be drinking it if you don't like the
taste, lol. But it will at least be available for cooking. So you can make pancakes from a mix that needs you to add more than just water......
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Tallulah Donating Member (127 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:09 AM
Response to Reply #17
19. Instant coffee
For the coffee lovers. Boy if you forget that, SOME people get cranky.
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dddem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 10:19 PM
Response to Reply #19
95. I've already brewed a couple of pots and refrigerated them
if we lose power, we can still have iced coffee.
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MADem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:09 AM
Response to Original message
20. You are a prince! Most of this I know from past experience, but the memory jog is priceless! nt
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texanwitch Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:17 AM
Response to Original message
25. A cooler with extra thick walls that will keep things really cold for severa days.
Edited on Fri Aug-26-11 12:17 AM by texanwitch
They cost more but are worth it.

Ice will be hard to come by so you want to keep it for as long as you can.

I have two big chest like this, both are on wheels.

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onestepforward Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 01:45 PM
Response to Reply #25
55. Get plenty of ice!
You'll go through it faster than you think and you may not be able to get any for days after the storm. It is critical for staying cool and preserving cold food items.

If you have a fish tank, watch the temperature if you go days without AC. You may need to add some ice to it if the water gets too hot.
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w0nderer Donating Member (430 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 04:22 PM
Response to Reply #55
68. if the filter is biological
remember batteries for a pump or alternate way to run a filter
or just remove the filter

30 minutes to an hour without water circulation/oxygenated water and the bacteria start dying off canceling that beautiful balance
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hfojvt Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:19 AM
Response to Original message
26. that's a decent list
however, I would note

clothes CAN be washed by hand and put on a line to dry

also, make sure your rechargeable batteries are all fully charged up AND you can find a flashlight in the dark.


Even for refrigerator in normal times, I generally fill up all my unused space with jugs of water. It helps to keep cool what would ordinarily be the nearly empty refrigerator of a single guy.

Just saying, if you have empty space in your fridge, consider filling it with a bottle of water. If nothing else, this will give you plenty of cold drinking water.

For sawing, I use a 36 inch bow saw. Like my bicycle, it is much slower, but it gets great gas mileage.
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Lydia Leftcoast Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 10:43 AM
Response to Reply #26
49. We get blackouts during thunderstorms here a couple of times a year
and my friendly local hardware store cued me into an emergency flashlight that stays plugged into the wall during normal times and glows with a red light during a blackout so that you can find it.
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hfojvt Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 02:42 PM
Response to Reply #49
57. yeah last Saturday the power went out at 1 am
and I was fumbling around in the dark for about five minutes, yelling "where the fu$% is my fu$&ing flashlight!!" before I finally found one in a kitchen drawer.
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Fumesucker Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:24 AM
Response to Original message
27. I have a 350 watt inverter that will run TV, computer and refrigerator (barely)..
Only one at a time from your 12v car battery..

It will also run other small things that work on regular house current..

If you plug in the refrigerator for a couple of hours twice a day you can keep it cool enough that your food will keep a lot longer.

You'll have to make sure not to let your car battery get so low that the car won't start though, inverters can draw a lot of current from the battery.

If you do get an inverter and want to watch TV then make sure you have an antenna that will pick up your local digital TV and a converter box if your TV does not have the tuner for digital.

I also have a lot of rechargeable AA batteries, it's amazing how fast you can go through disposable batteries when a flashlight is the only light you have at night. A small 12V AA charger is part of my kit too, plug it in the cigarette lighter socket in your car.

Someone mentioned the Maglite LED flashlights on another thread, I'll second that, the Maglites are bright, don't use the batteries too fast and they have a "candle" mode where you unscrew the reflector, turn it upside down and put the butt of the flashlight in it, you can then set it on a table and use it as a very bright electric candle that will light up a room better than you might think..

On low power mode my Maglite will put out a reasonable amount of light all night on just two rechargeable NiMH AA batteries.

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texanwitch Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:49 AM
Response to Reply #27
36. Those are great.
I have one with clips that will attach to a free standing car battery.

You can run a box fan with it for hours.

Or a little tv.
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Honeycombe8 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 03:57 PM
Response to Reply #36
65. Where do you get those? nt
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texanwitch Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 05:16 PM
Response to Reply #65
78. I got mine from Radio Shack.
It is a 350 watt dc to ac power inverter.

I bought it after Ike, never used it yet.

It comes with those clips that hook on to a battery posts.

I wanted something to run a fan with.

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CoffeeCat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:35 AM
Response to Original message
29. Also, collect all of your water bottles...
and fill them up with water now. Put them in the freezer and freeze them. If the power goes out, they'll thaw and you'll have fresh, cold water for a while. Fill up any container--such
as empty milk jugs or 2 liter soda bottles.

Also, get some cash from the ATM before this hits. You might need cash.

As others have said, fill the tub with water--when you need water for other uses.

I like the idea of having the grill and propane ready to go. GREAT suggestion.

I've also heard that turning up your freezer to its coldest setting will get everything rock hard. Then, if the power goes out, it will take several days (not one or two) to thaw
everything--and you'll be able to keep your freezer items frozen longer.

Best of luck to everyone dealing with Irene!! I hope she isn't as bad as the media is suggesting!

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w0nderer Donating Member (430 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 04:35 PM
Response to Reply #29
72. milk jugs can be iffy
milk being a little bit fatty and protein-y, getting those jugs clean can be a real pain

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kcass1954 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 07:25 PM
Response to Reply #72
83. Clean them with hot soapy water as soon as you empty them, and don't put the top back on.
Store in a big garbage bag with the tops off. I start saving at the beginning of hurricane season, and put them out for recycling at the end.

My dad had to evacuate his beach home in central Florida for Frances in 2004. He asked what he needed to bring to my home in south Florida, and I told him nothing. He laughed when he walked in my door - I had 72 gallons of water lined up against a wall in the dining room.

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w0nderer Donating Member (430 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 07:45 PM
Response to Reply #83
84. i use gatorade gallon ones instead
i get them from the local highschool coaches for free

i know how to get them clean (milk)
the standard recommendation is 'don't use milk jugs' because most people won't wash them
as hot, and as long as they need to be washed

obviously you do :-)

south fla here too and was here for Francis

sounds like your dining room looked like my kitchen

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bertman Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 08:46 PM
Response to Reply #72
86. We have at least 50 used, gallon, plastic milk jugs with their little snap on lids
in the crawlspace of our house. They're filled with water and just sit there waiting to be used to flush the toilet. The toilet flushing water doesn't need to be potable water, so you can store the jugs a loooong time before using them. If they are in a dark spot they don't grow algae.

Having those jugs saves the water in the tub for other purposes that require cleaner water.

We went through Hurricane Fran in '96, then a major ice storm in '02, so we've learned about the value of toilet-flushing water.

Great idea to post this list, Tx4obama.

REC.

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defendandprotect Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 09:22 PM
Response to Reply #86
88. Wait ... re bathtub water for flushing John -- do you put the water in the tank ... or in the bowl??
I would have thought the tank, but someone seems to be saying into the toilet?


Thanks -- :)
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Tx4obama Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 09:27 PM
Response to Reply #88
89. A long time ago I had to do it and I put the water into the tank.
Not so sure what everyone else is doing.

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defendandprotect Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 09:33 PM
Response to Reply #89
91. Thank you -- from NJ--!! Presume some here from NC may be reporting soon ... !!
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bertman Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 09:28 PM
Response to Reply #88
90. Just dump it directly into the bowl. You get a lot of GLUBS and a weak flush
but it clears the bowl. Sometimes it takes two jugs.

We have the "If it's YELLOW let it MELLOW. BROWN--flush it DOWN!" policy in effect for water conservation at our home every day, so it means we are already conditioned to use less water for flushing toilets.

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defendandprotect Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 09:36 PM
Response to Reply #90
92. Thank you -- !! Never experienced a hurricane before that I remember ... !!
Ironic that we had people in Cape May who wanted to ride out the storm!!

Mayor told them to put an index card in their left shoe with ID info so they

could identify them easily! How often we've watched Southerners prepare for

hurricanes and wanting to stay and think them nuts!! And now here we are

thinking the same way!



:)

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Kevin Cloyd Donating Member (104 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 10:39 PM
Response to Reply #88
96. I bucket flush the toilet
by pouring the water into the bowl, 2/3 of a five gal. bucket for older 3.5 gpf toilets and about 1/2 a five gallon bucket for newer 1.6 gpf toilets.

If it's yellow, let it mellow.
If it's brown, flush it down.
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Tx4obama Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:41 AM
Response to Original message
30. Here's a link below to another DU list with some excellent info on it
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texanwitch Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:46 AM
Response to Original message
31. I save the empty milk jugs with the lids for hurricane season.
We filled them up and put them in freezer before Ike hit.

The freezer was full of frozen milk jugs, the ice jugs came in handy.

First ice and then water.

This was old big chest type freezer, a really big one.

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SwampG8r Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:47 AM
Response to Original message
32. lol you post a list at peril on DU
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DURHAM D Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 12:48 AM
Response to Original message
33. Cash
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Hardrada Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 01:32 AM
Response to Reply #33
43. Smaller denoms too.
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Manifestor_of_Light Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 01:01 AM
Response to Original message
40. I went through Hurricane Ike in Houston.
Fortunately I had a gas range. I would heat up two teakettles full of water and put them in a barf bucket (large rectangular plastic thing you get in hospitals) in the bathtub, stand up and give myself a warm washrag bath.

If my house had been all-electric....I don't know what I would have done, since I can't stand cold showers.
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Tx4obama Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 01:07 AM
Response to Reply #40
42. I'm in Houston too. My house is the opposite of yours.
Electric stove, but gas water heater.
I think I would have rather of had your gas stove! :)

I would wouldn't have minded heating water on the stove in big pots to put in the bathtub - also boiling water for coffee would have been easier,
but cooking on a grill for two weeks was a pain in the arse :(

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tkmorris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 02:14 AM
Response to Reply #42
45. We have a camp stove for hurricanes
Seemed a bit silly when acquired, but man was I glad we had it! Coleman makes it, a two-burner model that runs on those mini propane tanks. About 1 liter apiece I believe. We have tons of em.

This is often overlooked by people who have generators but realize too late that their generator cannot supply the 220V needed to run their stovetop (some do, some don't). You'll be sitting there with all the food in the world and no way to cook it.
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gkhouston Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-26-11 01:22 PM
Response to Reply #45
54. Yeah, we've got one of those, too. Sat in the top of a closet,
unused, for years (we keep the propane in the breezeway), but it was wonderful to have when the need arose. Same goes for our crank radio/light.
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