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Answers to the Friday Afternoon Challenge...and another little treat for you!

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CTyankee Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-09-11 11:30 AM
Original message
Answers to the Friday Afternoon Challenge...and another little treat for you!
If you missed the Challenge yesterday and would like to take the Challenge, stop here and go to: http://www.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.ph... .

1. Titian's "Ariosto," later re-imagined by Rembrandt "Self Portrait."

2. Thomas Eakins "An Arcadian," re-imagined by Wyeth "Christina's World."

3. Glenn Brown's "Filth," from Fragonard "Portrait of Ballerina Sophie Guimard."

4. Millet's "Little Steps," later re-imagined by Van Gogh.

5. Ter Bruggen's "St. Matthew and the Angel," from Caravaggio's work of same title, probably the original (only a black and white photo exists), destroyed in WW2.

6. Van Gogh's "Japanese Bridge in the Rain," after Hiroshige's work of same title.

And because you have been such good art doobies, here is one I left out of yesterday's Challenge due to space considerations (it's not too hard!):


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Ichingcarpenter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-09-11 11:45 AM
Response to Original message
1. Whose the famous artist of this painting?



Its his first public work in 18 years.


Sorry I missed your friday challenge it was late in my time zone.
I only knew one this time.
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CTyankee Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-09-11 11:57 AM
Response to Reply #1
4. I believe I've seen one other work of this artist, judging by his style
and palate. The one I saw was of a child with an enormous head...I do not recall the artist's name, tho!
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Ichingcarpenter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-09-11 12:48 PM
Response to Reply #4
13.  enormous head and a pet tiger n/t
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Ichingcarpenter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jul-11-11 08:19 AM
Response to Reply #13
27. Bill Watterson
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suffragette Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-09-11 11:51 AM
Response to Original message
2. Le djeuner sur l'herbe Manet
is the reimagined painting.
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CTyankee Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-09-11 11:55 AM
Response to Reply #2
3. Yes, indeedy!
This is a woodcut of an original Raphael work entitled "The Judgment of Paris."

So Manet snuck a peek at Raphael... ;)
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suffragette Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-09-11 11:59 AM
Response to Original message
5. The Judgment of Paris, ca. 151020. Marcantonio Raimondi
In finding that, found a nice little website with many comparisons for this piece:
http://nbmaa.wordpress.com/2010/04/27/reinterpreted-art... herbe-by-edouard-manet/
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CTyankee Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-09-11 12:07 PM
Response to Reply #5
6. The New Britain Museum is a nice little gallery. I was there for a lovely exhibition of
Shaker furniture and I went with a small group of museum supporters, docents and the director on an art trip to Portugal.
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suffragette Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-09-11 12:40 PM
Response to Reply #6
7. Good to know. There's one museum I read about in the UK
that I meant to get to on my last trip to London, but did not make it there (though
I managed to get to the Courtald a couple times - love that collection).

It's an unusual niche museum for of all things - fans.


http://www.fan-museum.org/introduction.asp

http://www.fan-museum.org/exhibdetails.asp?exhibID=1


http://www.suite101.com/content/one-of-londons-best-sma...


http://www.thetraveleditor.com/article/3334/Things_to_d...

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CTyankee Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-09-11 12:43 PM
Response to Reply #7
9. Oh, thank you! I am trying to cook up a little getaway to London for an art foray
early next spring. I'll put that on my list!

So far my list includes the Tate, the National Gallery, Victoria and Albert, the British Museum, the Cortauld and the Wallace Collection (for about 45 minutes, which is all I can manage with Rococco art before I start to gag).

Do you have another suggestion?
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suffragette Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-09-11 01:24 PM
Response to Reply #9
14. The British Library is a must for me
Part of that is my lifelong love of literature - English Lit major.

In addition, they include stunning and diverse illuminated manuscripts in the small amount they have on display.


http://www.bl.uk/whatson/permgall/treasures/manuscripts...

Pictures can't capture the beauty of these. Here's one of Christine de Pisan writing I saw last visit.
http://www.bl.uk/catalogues/illuminatedmanuscripts/ILLU...


I will always seek out Cocteau's work, so I've been to the London Notre Dame church to see his mural. Worth going if you enjoy his work, as I very much do. Bonus is his self portrait. If you decide to go there, let me know. Even with a map and friend who lives in London, we walked around it many times before realizing the nondescript brick building housed the church.:
http://www.ndfchurch.org/en/parish-information/art-hist... /


Give yourself lots of time for the Courtauld. It's a gem. Also, courtyard is beautiful and calming, even in the center of London. Oh and the cafe is a sweet little refuge.


Also, just found this site which looks like it could lead to interesting discoveries:
http://www.cultureseekers.org /
Completely in agreement about Rococco, gag inducing for me as well.
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CTyankee Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-09-11 01:45 PM
Response to Reply #14
15. Thanks for the info!
Where do you stay in London? I'm thinking of getting a flight/hotel deal if I can find one in early April. I'm only thinking about a Saturday night flight, Sun-Thursday in London, Friday return type of trip out of JFK, which I can get to and from via CT Limo, which is reasonable. I've investigated some offerings but will be looking for some specials...
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suffragette Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-09-11 02:32 PM
Response to Reply #15
17. I stay with friends who live there
so I was farther out, one time in Hampstead, another in Camden since they moved there. The main reason I've gone is really to visit them.

The last time I stayed in a hotel in London was in the 70's and I can't recall its name so I don't really have a recommendation for that. That was in Kensington. Location was good.


Tripadvisor might have some deals. They also have a good active forum that can help you find the best way to get back and forth. They know and include details such as "that way has stairs with 20 steps, go this way instead":

http://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowForum-g186338-i17-London...


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suffragette Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-09-11 03:44 PM
Response to Reply #9
19. Also I should note the fan museum is in Greenwich
not London so it would be a day side trip. That's the reason I didn't make it and it doesn't look like it would really fit timewise for your trip either.
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CTyankee Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-09-11 04:42 PM
Response to Reply #19
20. I saw that and was going to mapquest it...but thanks for the further info.
I was actually in London before, when I was 16 years old. All I really remember about London was my embarrassment (and my mother's) when I tripped and fell going UP the steps to St. Paul's Cathedral...
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suffragette Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-09-11 06:13 PM
Response to Reply #20
21. Ouch. You should have seen me going down the inner
pyramid steps at Chichen Itza.
We'd been caught outside in an intense thunderstorm and were drenched.
Only two people even attempted the outer pyramid. The rest of our group went inside once we could.
Between the heat and humidity inside and everyone dripping and steaming, the steps became very slick. Up was no problem, but it was a challenge coming back down. Even though much younger and in shape, I made my way down carefully, but slid every few steps and had major leg cramping from it.

It is awhile since you were last there. Prices are high there, but the food's much better now.

This link may come in handy:
http://www.heathrow-airport-guide.co.uk/london.html

Last time I went, I took my friends' advice and one item I splurged on was taking Heathrow Express in to London and on return to the airport. Pricey but worth it for ease and time savings (and dealing with jet lag from the 9 hour flight) and since Heathrow Connect doesn't have a direct connection to my arrival terminal.

Do search the threads over in the trip advisor forum. There are some good ones about most every topic.
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CTyankee Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-09-11 06:37 PM
Response to Reply #21
22. Thanks, what great advice! I'll do that, especially since I don't have a big
jet lag. It's so easy getting in and out of JFK to Europe it's a temptation to just "do it" and go, if you are like me, in nearby CT.

I'm in Europe every year now since 2005...it's been my thing in retirement...
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suffragette Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jul-10-11 11:59 AM
Response to Reply #22
23. Something fascinating
I just looked up what the special exhibitions will be at the Courtauld and noticed the current one is called "Falling Up: The Gravity of Art."

How timely given what you just said about your last visit to London.
:)

Looks like it will be Mondrian for April.

It was LOVE AND MARRIAGE IN RENAISSANCE FLORENCE: THE COURTAULD WEDDING CHESTS when I went there.


Another interesting timely note. The Courtauld has a smaller version of Manet's Dejeuner sur lherbe on display.

Here's a link to a virtual tour they have to get a small (very small) taste of what's there:
http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/gallery/3d-gallery/index.sht...


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CTyankee Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jul-10-11 04:48 PM
Response to Reply #23
24. That is so cool! I didn't know they had that Manet of the girl at the Folies Bergere!
Interesting. When I went to London all those many years ago WW2 had been over only 11 years. It was a very different Europe then. I haven't been back to London but I have been to Paris and will be going to Amsterdam in October (I remember "The Night Watch" vividly). I remember Versailles as being drafty and very poor looking, even with the chandeliers. In a way, it is interesting: I saw postwar Europe in a way a lot of people nowadays would have no way of knowing. Now that I have read about the predatory activities of the Nazis in terms of art in the days leading up to and during WW2 I can grasp the absolute horror of what happened to the art of the western world during that time. I've just finished "The Rape of Europa" and it is an eye-opener. If you haven't read it, I recommend it highly...
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suffragette Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jul-10-11 09:20 PM
Response to Reply #24
25. Oh, there is so much there that is amazing.
Much more than you can see even on their website.

What gets named here is only a part:
http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/gallery/collections/index.sh...

There is a painting there by Heinrich Campendonk that just swept me away. I was not familiar with him, but he was one of the artists whose work the Nazis castigated as "degenerate art." He was dismissed from his teaching positon and left Germany.

Here's the painting I noted. I love that her body looks like a cello:




Ah, that is a long time. When I was there the 1st time in the late 70's, the buildings were blackened with soot. At some point, they cleaned them and that was one of the 1st things I noticed in 2002. The prices are steep there. I found them much higher than in Paris or Amsterdam. It will be fascinating for you to go there again and experience it so differently now.
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CTyankee Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jul-11-11 08:11 AM
Response to Reply #25
26. Oh, I forgot to tell you that I did see the Folies Bergere girl by Manet
at the Musee D'Orsay in April. It was in their special Manet exhibition, which had just about every important painting he did. I made an assumption that the Folies Bergere one was part of the Orsay's permanent collection. I loved the Manet show and was surprised when I got back to read a downer NYT review of it! It took me over an hour to go thru it all, but it was richly rewarding.
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suffragette Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jul-11-11 09:19 AM
Response to Reply #26
28. This will be great for you to have seen it at the D'Orsay
and again in its home in this more intimate setting. Reminds me more in some ways of when I first saw the collection now at the D'Orsay when it was housed in the smaller Jeu de Paume in the 70's.

Reviews can be so subjective, can't they?
Again, although the Courtauld is small I notice most reviews of it leave out some aspect of what's there.
This one names a bit more of the breadth than most:
http://www.connoisseur-magazine.com/arts-a-culture/exhi...
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Manifestor_of_Light Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jul-11-11 01:15 PM
Response to Reply #26
29. The Bar at the Folies Bergere must be stunning to see.
I remember the art history prof, Dr. Peter Guenther, raving about it while showing us a slide of it at the University of Houston. I remember it was silver and blue shiny, somewhat like a mirror all over, being Impressionist.

Dear CTYankee, I love all your quizzes, even though they are quite difficult!
This week I found out that Christina's World had a predecessor and the naked lady having lunch on the lawn had a predecessor too.

So much fun! Someday I will get to Europe to check out the musea and cathedrals.

I am thinking of breaking down and subscribing to Art in America.
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Mojorabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-09-11 12:40 PM
Response to Original message
8. Thanks for doing these
I always look forward to it.
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CTyankee Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-09-11 12:45 PM
Response to Reply #8
11. So glad you like them! Next week will be different...themed to the season!
Stop by. It ought to be fun...
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Bluerthanblue Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-09-11 12:44 PM
Response to Original message
10. wow... this was a great challenge
sorry I missed it.

:hi:
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CTyankee Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-09-11 12:46 PM
Response to Reply #10
12. Thanks! I had SO much fun putting it together!
Picasso once famously said "Good artists copy. Great artists steal" and he sure did his share of that...(I didn't use his reimaginings in the Challenge because they are such dead giveaways...)
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EFerrari Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-09-11 01:46 PM
Response to Reply #10
16. It was fun!
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Tierra_y_Libertad Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-09-11 02:37 PM
Response to Original message
18. Thanks for all of your challenges. They remind me why I enjoyed the Art History classes.
:applause:
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