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Should Cyanuric Acid be present in tap water?

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FloriTexan Donating Member (481 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jul-01-11 10:23 AM
Original message
Should Cyanuric Acid be present in tap water?
We've been having some trouble with our pool chemistry and learned that we had very high levels of it requiring us to drain at least half the pool water and replace it with tap water. However, halfway through the process we noticed no decrease in CA levels. To make sure our test strips were working we tested the water coming out of our faucet and found it to be on the low side of normal for pools.

Does anyone know if that normal or dangerous?
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PoliticAverse Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jul-01-11 10:28 AM
Response to Original message
1. Where does the tap water come from? n/t
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FloriTexan Donating Member (481 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jul-01-11 10:49 AM
Response to Reply #1
7. The city/reservoir - not a well n/t
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PoliticAverse Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jul-01-11 10:59 AM
Response to Reply #7
8. They're probably adding chlorine to it.
Call them and ask them.

You may want to pass your drinking water through an activated-charcoal filter.

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Canuckistanian Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jul-01-11 10:28 AM
Response to Original message
2. Cyanuric acid is "essentially nontoxic", it's used to stabilize chlorine
Every swimming pool has some in it. I haven't heard of any particular warnings about using it or it's presence in tap water.
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enlightenment Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jul-01-11 10:31 AM
Response to Original message
3. Since CYA is used to stabilize chlorine,
and chlorine is used to treat tap water, I'd imagine it's normal for it to be in your water. If you check with your local water authority, they should be able to tell you exactly what is in what comes out of your tap. It's an eye-opener, I've found.

BTW - my friend also had this problem with CYA and discovered that the real culprit is the stabilized chlorine tablets (and granules) that most pool-owners use in their systems. They contain CYA, so everytime you add them, you're adding to the issue. CYA is important, especially in very hot, sunny places - but it's a nightmare when it gets out of hand.

My friend switched to a salt system (generating chlorine) and it's proven worth the money, just in pool chemicals alone.
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FloriTexan Donating Member (481 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jul-01-11 11:16 AM
Response to Reply #3
9. We actually have a salt system...
but its one that isn't manufactured anymore; and we thought the last and only replacement cell we found in the internet wasn't working. So, we are using chlorine til we can replace the entire salt syste we have. I'm sure there is operator error involved ;) Now, we're hoping the salt cell wasn't generating correctly because of the high CA. Before we can test it though we have to get the CA down which is kind of hard when we're pumping it back in with out tap water. Obviously draining half the pool wasn't going to work so we're replacing much more than that now.

We were just surprised that the CA was in the tap water.
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enlightenment Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-02-11 10:55 AM
Response to Reply #9
10. Ah.
Edited on Sat Jul-02-11 10:55 AM by enlightenment
Have you tried browsing this site?
http://www.troublefreepool.com/pool-school /

The "pool school" is really helpful. It's worth spending some time exploring.

Good luck - I know it is enormously frustrating to fight these things.
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formercia Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jul-01-11 10:32 AM
Response to Original message
4. As long as you don't drink the pool water.
CYANURIC ACID: Chlorine tablets and granular chlorine are the two most commonly used forms of chlorine. These two forms of chlorine are classified as Cyanurates, which simply means they contain Cyanuric Acid as an ingredient. Cyanuric Acid is a chemical that protects chlorine from being destroyed by the sun. Since chlorine is so susceptible to the sun's ultraviolet rays, Cyanuric Acid is a necessary ingredient.

Although chlorine tablets and granular chlorine contain some Cyanuric Acid as an ingredient, the amount contained is merely a trace. Therefore, chlorine users will have to add Cyanuric Acid periodically. Cyanuric Acid is typically packaged and sold as either "Conditioner" or "Stabilizer," depending on the manufacturer.

Cyanuric Acid ("Conditioner" or "Stabilizer") will definitely need to be added after a pool is drained, cleaned and refilled, as the tap water that is used to refill your pool contains almost no Cyanuric Acid. If there are just trace amounts of Cyanuric Acid in the pool water, then it does not matter how much chlorine (or shock) is added. The majority of it will be destroyed by the sun.

--snip--

http://www.poolmanual.com/manual/cyanuric.html
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bob4460 Donating Member (173 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jul-01-11 10:35 AM
Response to Original message
5. Yes it is Chlorine stabilizer for pool water N/T
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ipfilter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jul-01-11 10:40 AM
Response to Original message
6. The strips are not as accurate as the turbidity test.
The more accurate test uses a vile with a black dot in the bottom. You add drops until you can't see the dot. The number of drops added will give you a close estimate of the CYA ppm.
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