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SoCalDem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-10-11 02:11 PM
Original message
Anyone waiting for a return to "middle class", may be waiting forever
Edited on Fri Jun-10-11 02:52 PM by SoCalDem
Middle Class status was a blip...an aberration, a cultural iconic status that was well-hyped, and actually achieved by very few.

A look at American life in the rear view mirror is helpful in understanding it.

Prior to our entry into WWII, MOST people lived in a rich-poor USA. People in big cities lived crammed into small apartments (often over Mom& Pop) businesses that barely covered expenses, or in run-down tenement buildings.

Rural/small-town people lived a hand-to-mouth existence, and worked dawn to dusk...usually in very small ramshackle places.

The country was mired in depression/post depression angst, with men roaming the country looking for work, and families loading up what little they had into anything they could move, just to try their luck somewhere else. Jobs were scarce, and when found, paid little. The only "un-rich" who had credit were the ones who "owed their soul to the company-store".


WWII swooped up most of the men and sent them abroad, which immediately created millions of "job openings".

It's no surprise that an eager female workforce snapped up those jobs, and gave us pretty much "full employment".

Post-WWII (only a 6 yr span from start to finish), brought back the men (and displaced most of the women) and with those men, an eagerness to make up for lost time. It's also important to remember that most of the rest of the world's production capacity was thrashed, so we were poised to shoot right to the top of the heap, and we did.

The timeline from 1950 (when most of the ones in the GI Bill had finished college) to the mid-60's, created millions of new families who truly needed everything. The generation born after the war would be living AWAY from the "family homes". Until after the war , it was not unusual for families to be in multi-generational living arrangements.

A look at old census records showed me that at one time in the late 20's, my grandparents lived at an address that also housed 2 brothers, their wives and children and 3 elderly parents. As a kid I rode bikes & roller-skated past that old house many times, never even knowing the history of that place, or that once upon a time, my ancestors jammed so many people into that 4 bedroom house.

Post WWII vets had earned the right to have their own place, and took advantage of the opportunity.

Movies, magazines & later TV, showed us all what "middle class" was supposed to be, and Madison Avenue was happy to oblige.

As the only exporter of "stuff", and a country with tremendous pent-up demand for all the goods & services that people had been denied by first the Depression and later the war, it's no surprise that we boomed.

Even in the midst of "middle class", it never really was what we had all been sold, because the seeds of destruction had already been planted. There were many children, who would soon be fighting each other for jobs that would start disappearing as they aged.

People who had never dreamed that they would own a home, were able to buy that house & have a car and take a vacation now and then, and even save some money, but behind the scenes, business was already trying to find ways to eliminate expenses, and with them , jobs.

As a child of the 50's, it was rare to find ANYTHING in stores that was not "made in the USA". Occasionally we would run across something that said "Made in occupied Japan", and a little later, just "Made in Japan", but that stuff did not sell well to people who had recently been at war with Japan.

Business is all about profit, and every penny saved on wages & benefits, is a penny in the pockets of the ones in charge.

The children of WWII vets & their wives never experienced the Depression, and had only ever known plenty, so it should come as no surprise, that this generation would not be as frugal as their parents' & grandparents' generations had been...especially after a young-lifetime of being indulged by parents who felt lucky to have survived the war and who had so much more than many of them had ever expected to have.

This era also ushered in (in a big way) cheap throw-away stuff. It was suddenly possible (even preferred) to buy single use "stuff". Where people used to hang onto things and repair them over and over, and then dismantle them for parts for the "next one", now those items were just tossed out and a new one bought to replace it. Repair shops faded away...and with them, a family income went as well.

For 169 years (1776-1945), America was rich v poor, with very little in the middle, and in a 6 year period, we "created" Middle Class". By the time the 1970's rolled around, "Middle Class" was getting a little ragged around the edges, and starting to be less achievable by more and more people.

Credit cards replaced wage-increases necessary to maintain the standard of living that most people now felt entitled to, and as the rest of the world needed less of what we "made", it was no surprise that jobs and the benefits that came with those jobs, would start to decline in number. The technology boom also made whole swaths of "the economy" outdated and non-existent. The problem though, is that there were people....real people...still attached to those segments of vanished job markets. Those people had/have families, and expenses.

The union movement (earned at great cost decades earlier) was becoming "unnecessary" because there were just so many Boomers to fill a shrinking number of jobs, and mechanization was marching along to eliminate more jobs.

Decades of bad legislation and sweetheart deals made in back rooms, have sold us all out, and the need to rely on credit for so many, have undone millions of families.

Recession after recession , with an aggravating regularity, coupled with recurring bouts of massive fraud and the following taxpayer bail-outs , has dealt the Middle Class a pretty shitty hand, and there are no more Aces in the deck.

We may be soon returning to the way of life we had for most of our nation's "life"....a hand-to-mouth, unsure way of living...We had a blip of about 30 years of what most would call "Middle Class" (mostly for the people born in the early-1930's) , and now it's ending, and we're headed back to what we always were..rich v poor, with most of us scrambling for the scraps. We may have better quality scraps these days, but they are still scraps..

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RandomThoughts Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-10-11 02:16 PM
Response to Original message
1. The verse about 'dogs getting scraps from the table'
Was a correction or an admonishment.

So don't be so self righteous if you think you are at the table.


And I might add a loaf of bread to that table, if you think it is for society to be rich and poor.

And I am due beer and travel money, and that will be sent.





Brothers in Arms - Dire Straits
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k5JkHBC5lDs

Bonnie Raitt - I Can't Make You Love Me
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nW9Cu6GYqxo

Bonnie Raitt - Nick Of Time
http://www.123video.nl/playvideos.asp?MovieID=407128

Dire Straits - Walk of Life
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZxVC0GB838
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SoCalDem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-10-11 02:18 PM
Response to Reply #1
3. not self-righteous.. just another one accepting scraps
Edited on Fri Jun-10-11 02:18 PM by SoCalDem
for most of my life :)

I will gladly share my scraps with you... but we have no beer :P
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InkAddict Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-10-11 02:52 PM
Response to Reply #3
11. We could pool our resources and make our own pissy beer
but that would necessitate a bit of patience while things foment, er, ferment - so little instant gratification left, sigh...and by the time that long-range planning becomes now, there's little that can be done w/the original recipe for best/better results. WYSIWG?

P.S. I'd like a nice foamy head on that beer, LOL, and a whole lot more experience(s).
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InkAddict Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-10-11 03:18 PM
Response to Reply #11
12. OMG, I've located the beer and travel money....
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girl gone mad Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-10-11 02:18 PM
Response to Original message
2. k & r ..
though I am not entirely pessimistic. We have the tools and ability to do the right thing, but the neoliberals currently in power use these tools only to save the kelptocrats while allowing the rest of us to suffer.
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LiberalCatholic Donating Member (37 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-10-11 02:27 PM
Response to Original message
4. I think
the difference now is that people expect a better life. People are angry and even Republicans seem to be waking up. Pendulums swing and I believe that we are about to see a large shift. I think that Republicans have over played their hand and have woken up the masses. Keep in mind that a more liberal country can rebuild itself...
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SoCalDem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-10-11 02:33 PM
Response to Reply #4
8. It's do-able, but not with the governing style we have now
and have had for decades.. Just look at how many people don't even seem to WANT a better life :grr: These people regularly vote against their own self interest, just so they can "punish" people they don't "like"..
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dothemath Donating Member (221 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-12-11 06:03 PM
Response to Reply #8
34. Mom and apple pie
Be careful there, sir/madam, people voting to punish people they don't like is as American as Mom and apple pie. It is a planned result of the dumbing down of America - and don't fool yourself into thinking the dumbing down process is a recent phenomenon. When Strom Thurmond was a SC legislator or governor, I forget which now, but the point is it was a long time ago, he voted against a bill that would require school attendance until a child reached 16 years of age. Child labor laws hadn't really kicked in in earnest yet and where were the children (some as young as 6 years old) going to come from to work in the textile mills?

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SoCalDem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-12-11 06:53 PM
Response to Reply #34
35. In "some locales/mindsets"..yes
Unfortunately :(

Disgruntled people are often targets, because human nature wants to "find" someone to blame.. It CAN'T be US :)..someone else must always be the scapegoat :(

I always marvel at how after a disaster, people are so willing to Thank God for saving/sparing/helping them.. By default they MUST be worthy, but apparently their neighbors did not have a close connection to God, since he
allowed their home to burn down/blow away/etc. :evilgrin:


For pols, a malleable/less-informed populace is not such a bad idea.. The press & media aids their efforts to dumb-down :(
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OHdem10 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-10-11 02:31 PM
Response to Original message
5. That period of Prosperity growth of a Middle CLass was our Legacy
from Presient Franklin Delano Roosevelt). The Republicans
have been on a Mission to destroy those old New Deal Policies.

Guess what, they have succeeded.

Three times in the past few days I have heard the comment
that it will be ten (10) years limping along with high
employment. (Fox, Bloomberg, C. Rose).
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RKP5637 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-10-11 02:32 PM
Response to Original message
6. That certainly parallels my life of about the same time frame. A good run after
WWII and then degradation to now. And the emergence of the throwaway environment with cheap junk goods. Most of the crap today isn't even worth repairing if one could even get the parts.

Now, with competition the US is going to have a hard time catching up and who really in fact needs the US or will in a global economy when many have the skills and better than we once did.

Our opportunities and initial progress were squandered by many politicians of all political parties and others with positions of power over the years. Now, we are using trickle down voodoo economics to try to work magic, the same old tricks, and I don't think it's going to really work.

We need to retool for the 21st century, but the propaganda and insane mindsets of this country coupled with religious hype run so deep I wonder if much progress will be made or are really moving into the dark ages for most.

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drpepper67 Donating Member (224 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-10-11 02:32 PM
Response to Original message
7. It must be a regional thIng.
I don't see it where I live in middle Tennessee.

Hemlock Semiconductor is building a $1.2 Billion ( yes B for Billion) plant near by. Housing prices are going up. New cars are selling. It's an hour wait in Friday night at Outback.

I just don't see it where I live. I'm on vacation at Gulf Shores, Alabama and this place is full if people.
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SoCalDem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-10-11 02:36 PM
Response to Reply #7
9. Some people will always have more than others..
Edited on Fri Jun-10-11 02:37 PM by SoCalDem
and jobs "taken" from one region to another is not an overall "gain"..

It's the "commons" thing :)

It's cyclical...


The factories of the north migrated to cheap labor in the south..and then to mexico and finally to asia/india/haiti/etc.

A boom here is probably the result of a bust somewhere else :( Enjoy the boom while you can :)
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KittyWampus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-10-11 05:14 PM
Response to Reply #7
15. Is TN getting the business built cause it's "Right To Work" (no unions-crappy wages)?
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drpepper67 Donating Member (224 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-12-11 11:45 AM
Response to Reply #15
31. That's probably why Volkswagen is building a new plant near Chattanooga.
But the wages aren't crap.

The average pay for line workers at the Hemlock plant, I've heard, will be about $60K a year.

Engineers will be paid $100K a year.
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Bluenorthwest Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-12-11 07:52 AM
Response to Reply #7
25. Unemployment rate in Tennessee is 9.6%. According to TN.
17.2 percent official poverty rate in TN. Alabama's is 17.5. That is good compared to say, Mississippi, but high compared to other States. You might not see it, but it sure is there for those who look. Nearly one in five live in poverty yet you do not see it? Perhaps it is time for an eye exam?
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drpepper67 Donating Member (224 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-12-11 11:58 AM
Response to Reply #25
32. Maybe.
But them you would think the wait for a table at Outback wouldn't be over an hour on Saturday night.

{shurgs}
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U4ikLefty Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-12-11 06:55 PM
Response to Reply #32
36. What is the wait at the unemployment line?
{shurgs}
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BOG PERSON Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-10-11 02:38 PM
Response to Original message
10. maybe we'll wind up living sort of like most post-soviet russians do
wallowing in alcoholism, despair and punctured hubris, living off the grey economy, and so forth.
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inna Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-10-11 03:32 PM
Response to Original message
13. K&R and thank you for writing/sharing this.

The period of relative prosperity for most American workers was an aberration indeed, but what's important is that it was a result of specific and deliberate economic policies aimed at making American capitalism more "worker-friendly". Look at the charts of taxation and economic growth during the 50s and 60s for the richest vs the poorest vs the rest - everybody was actually growing together, more or less, and the rich were contributing their (more or less) fair share to the common economic welfare. What a stunning contrast with current economic policies (of the last 30 years) that are deliberately catered for the rich, at the expense of everyone else. Plutocrats took over, basically.
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GeorgeGist Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-10-11 05:00 PM
Response to Original message
14. There are other countries ...
where the middle class isn't dieing.
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BOG PERSON Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-10-11 06:25 PM
Response to Reply #14
16. yeah...
Edited on Fri Jun-10-11 06:25 PM by BOG PERSON
countries like china!
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russspeakeasy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jun-11-11 01:18 PM
Response to Original message
17. What a well written piece...Thanks.
Sad. But on point..
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chervilant Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jun-11-11 06:32 PM
Response to Original message
18. hmm...
Middle Class status was a blip...an aberration, a cultural iconic status that was well-hyped, and actually achieved by very few.


We can lament the painful ripping of the blinders from our reluctant eyes, as we come to understand just how well-hyped has been the iconic 'middle-class' status. However, we must understand that those of us who self-identify as 'middle-class'--no matter how modest our homes, how small our cars, how austere our savings--certainly have had more than the majority of our brethren hoi polloi in most other countries.

I am compelled to quote Sahlins:


The market-industrial system institutes scarcity, in a manner completely unparalleled and to a degree nowhere else approximated. Where production and distribution are arranged through the behavior of prices, and all livelihoods depend on getting and spending, insufficiency of material means becomes the explicit, calculable starting point of all economic activity. ... Consumption is a double tragedy: what begins in inadequacy will end in deprivation.


If we look at Economic Anthropology, and undertake a macro-level understanding of our economic behaviors, it's clear that we could create a different paradigm. Perhaps our post-WWII 'experiment' in socialistic capitalism (is that an oxymoron?) comes close to illustrating that potential?

Capitalism--unchecked and unfettered by compassion for one's fellow human being--is definitively about hierarchy. By definition, only a very few humans are allowed to clamber to the top of the ladder, and they command the lion's share of wealth.
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DesertFlower Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jun-11-11 07:05 PM
Response to Original message
19. i was born in '41. my dad and my uncles were
in the navy. we lived with my grandparents. when dad came home he moved in with us. a few years later my parents got their own apartment. it was a 4 room cold water flat, but we were happy to have a place of our own. in '53 my parents bought a house on long island. it cost $10,000 with $500 down.

i'm fortunate. my husband has been with an international computer company for 42 years. he's 64 and has no plans to retire unless he's forced to. he'll be getting a really nice pension. about 10 years ago the company changed the pension to a 401k but those with enough years were able to stay under the old pension plan.

we're truly fortunate.
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baldguy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jun-11-11 07:09 PM
Response to Original message
20. The Middle Class was a conscious creation of federal govt policies of the '30s, '40s & '50s.
When those policies were weakened & eliminated, so was the Middle Class.
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caseymoz Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-12-11 02:25 AM
Response to Original message
21. One important thing you forgot to note . . .

And I wonder why so many people miss this.

The US prosperity after WWII had a lot to do with the fact that we were the only major economy still standing. We were selling things all over the world.

Another factor in that might have been the CIA having set up "friendly" regimes on the US payroll who let our industries cut sweet deals. A strong dollar, the strongest currency in the world, made this possible.

Since then, the world has rebuilt itself. Nations are no longer just our sources of raw materials, or buyers of our products; they are competitive with us. Meanwhile, the dollar is not the super-currency it was in the post-war years, meaning our foreign ventures, including putting dictators in power and paying them off, are less viable and prohibitively expensive. This isn't helped by the fact that resentment has built up in those countries.

So, the US is in decline. And it really wasn't our national ideals or our exceptionalism that put us on top in the first place. It's only that our lucky streak has ended.
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burrowowl Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-12-11 02:38 AM
Response to Original message
22. K&R
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jtuck004 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-12-11 03:07 AM
Response to Original message
23. "this generation would not be as frugal as their parents' & grandparents' generations had been" ??
Edited on Sun Jun-12-11 03:08 AM by jtuck004
Say WTF? Blame people who worked hard every day, who took on the appropriate percentages of debt that the banks told them they could have, who invested the later years in their life, at horrendous interest, to have a comfortable life for their families?

Later in the post it says

"Decades of bad legislation and sweetheart deals made in back rooms, have sold us all out, and the need to rely on credit for so many, have undone millions of families."

So which is it - spendthrift ordinary citizens or avaricious, self-dealing, soul-less politicians and business people who sold us out for far too little? Can't say both, that's just sitting on the fence, a particularly worthless activity.

Because if it was the mom going to work every day to help pay the house payment or the damn taxes to keep government workers employed and offering services, then we can let the politicians off the hook.

On the other hand, if it was the crooked, back-room deals that have become so common TPTB don't even bother to move them to a back room any longer, the people that started the unjust wars and gave other people's kids a death sentence for doing no more than their duty to their country, who pass freakin' laws that underwrite criminal activity on a global scale which funnels money to the wealthy while cutting the pittance given to the most vulnerable, those who have been screwed over most of their life by never being paid fairly for their labor, perhaps we should take the blame off the person who did nothing but believe in the people they elected to do the right thing, or in the boss they never took a sick day from.

The reason we had a middle class is because we cooperated with each other, and we invested in each other and our country. The people of the earlier era weren't frugal - they were deprived. They didn't conserve, they didn't have anything to waste. But they dove in and died for and built a country, without any promise of remuneration for themselves (those wars and dams and schools and highways wouldn't deliver their promise for a decade, or two, or three - long after the people who built them moved away).

It is not people living the life they, or their parents, worked for. The problem was, and is, a country led by the lowest common denominators in leadership, a class of people who have stolen and continue to steal most of the private wealth while moving the rest of us slowly but surely to the expense column.

And until we gain that idea of investing for the long-term again, we are going to continue to fade.

Otherwise, nice piece.
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Fool Count Donating Member (878 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-12-11 04:10 AM
Response to Original message
24. Middle class Americans have the Soviet Union (and the socialist
alternative it presented) to thank for their lifestyle. As soon as that alternative was extinguished
the capitalist class no longer felt any pressure to share the wealth with the workers. To say that
it is lost forever is a bit too pessimistic though. It is like saying that there never will be any
other alternative to the capitalist economic system, which would be an extreme and totally unjustified
underestimation of humanity's fighting spirit and inventiveness.
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alcibiades_mystery Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-12-11 08:17 AM
Response to Original message
26. The pining for the so-called "middle class," is roughly equal to the nostalgia for manufacturing
It's amazing to see otherwise perfectly rational people on the Left screaming that we need to "return" to the Fordist assembly line of the industrial period. That they view "making actual things" (as they call it) through rose colored glasses is clear enough. Working in capitalist factories fucking sucked - it was deadening and deskilling and people fucking hated it (for good reason) - and it sucked all the more so all the time, as the intensification of work operations continued apace. Do they forget the Lordstown strikes? I mean, these were only 40 years ago.

As soon as I hear anybody say "We need to go back to making things," I know I'm speaking with people who are functioning according to the worst sort of nostalgic nonsense. You go "make something," which is to say, you go turn the same screw into the same engine part hundreds of times a day for 30 fucking years. The truth of the factories is that nobody MADE anything, since the entire process of making was stolen by the capitalist owners, subdivided into ever smaller component parts, organized by automation and machinery, and turned into an exterior function. If you think the boring office job is horrible, try manufacturing. It's fucking deadening.

But that's what some "leftists" all want to "go back to." They're as delusional as the "We Want Our Country Back" right wing idiots.
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TheKentuckian Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-12-11 11:25 AM
Response to Reply #26
29. It beats the alternative, complete loss of production and the accompanying systemic
resource drain along with the loss of occupation for huge segments of people in exchange for a lie. A lie that says our people will no longer have to live from the sweat of their brow and that we can be a country of hundreds of millions of inventors, venture capitalists, doctors, programmers and engineers.

Turning that screw for thirty years may have been soul sapping and dull but it provided a decent living, vacations, benefits, and a comfortable retirement for those who were not going to be rocket scientists or urban planners that contributed to the health and strength of our common economy which meant increased opportunity for upward social mobility. One could open their own little shop to sell and repair manufactured goods or someone else could open a cafe that those folks tediously turning screws could eat lunch in.

Hell, masses of people with living wages makes it possible for a government to have the tax income to make investments in research and development for future generations of technology as well as provide somewhat for those left behind.

On shoring our production is not a cure all since automation and manufacturing modernization will almost forever shrink the need for workers but it is more sensible then willfully sending most of the fruits of our labor overseas in exchange for junk made by virtual slaves in a race to the bottom with a few lucky and very wealthy winners.
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alcibiades_mystery Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-12-11 11:29 AM
Response to Reply #29
30. Both alternatives are fucked and unworkable
And they are so because the system remains the same in either.

Nostalgia for the capitalist factory is as great a load of bullshit as the current ludicrous mania for "hundreds of millions of inventors, venture capitalists, doctors, programmers and engineers."

They are both fucking violent and ridiculous proposals.
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annabanana Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-12-11 08:44 AM
Response to Original message
27. While I want desperately to dispute this grim determination. .
...everything I've seen and learned over the last 61 years tell me you're right.

I don't know if it's even possible to teach the kids how to cope with what's coming. Their only hope is to be able to see AROUND the corrupt CorpoMedia and organize like crazy...
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End Of The Road Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-12-11 09:19 AM
Response to Original message
28. May I also add...?
U.S. Population:

1950 - 152 million +
2010 - 308 million +

I don't see any way we could have sustained the post-war "aberrations", as you put it (and I agree), with such population growth.

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Puget Progressive Donating Member (61 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-12-11 12:59 PM
Response to Original message
33. The Class War continues
It would be very instructive to read either of the two books left to us by the late (and great) Joe Bageant. I recommend starting with "Deer Hunting with Jesus". In his books and many essays on the website devoted to his work Joe elaborated on what it was like to grow up in Amerika's permanent underclass, now 40+ million strong. Yes, we HAVE been sold out by a shameless and criminal oligarchy and their stooges in Congress and the courts. The Middle Class (which I grew up in) was an aberration and it will not come back despite all of the BS rhetoric about the "recovery". Take the time to read Joe Bageant and learn about these people's lives. Ironically, it is they who will now have less of a hard time adjusting to the permanent recession that is being engineered for the great majority of us who are being shut out of the "American Dream".
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dogmoma56 Donating Member (329 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-12-11 08:53 PM
Response to Reply #33
37. richest 1% holds 42% of Americas Financial Wealth, top 5% holds 72%, bottom 80% holds only 7% >link>

Abraham Vereide.. he created the present GOP >Links> he was a Nazi who taught

at god only loves/bless's the rich, hates and is punishing the poor.. so it is a sin to tax a rich man an a sin to help the poor. sound familure.?


Abraham Vereide's principals/DOGMA is ..the Tax Cuts for the rich, trickle down economics, the New World Order, Globalism.. but who actually runs the GOP..??

these are all Dominionist Principals..!!

the Dominionists work in the Shadows. in 1934 a Nazi refugee Abraham Vereide started what is now the "C st Family", the Christian Fellowship, A.K.A.the Christian Mafia.. and have taken the Evangelical movement into the Dark Side. THEY ARE BY DEFINATION..the Anti-Christ, don't get me wrong, i am a Buddhist i don't believe in the 'Revelation's', but i did grow up in the Free Holyness Pentecostal church. when i was 6 our Sunday school taught us Revelation's. then Romans, Acts, then Revelation's again, but i have a IQ of 164.. so it didn't stick.

the Dominionists believe that God/Jesus only bless the Rich, Wealth and Power is proof of gods Favor of a man/corporation, so it is a sin to tax them. God Speaks directly to the rich/Powerful, the poor must "Submit" totally to their will, and become a slave to god. the poor are being punished by god so it is a sin to help them, or not to torment them.

Trickle Down doesn't mean money, it means only gods blessings to those who followed gods greatest plan and made the rich richer. the New World Order is the Utopian Paradise created when all the worlds poor submit to gods great plan, and become slaves.. the GOP is Theocratic Cargo Cult of OCD psychotic narcissistic wealth/power hoarders.. in the 30's Depression FDR appointed Abraham Vereide to a Cabinet position to start programs for the poor to bring them out of poverty.. Vereide's plan was to start Dominionist evangelical "Revivals" all over the country, only the Poor who came and prayed thru and totally submitted to the Dominion of the rich and Gods great plan would get help. he was replaced ..he immediately began undermining the New Deal.. still the fundamental purpose of the GOP is to repeal the New Deal, because it is the work of Satan, communists and Socialists, all interchangeable.

this is back ground info

... this is one of the best..especially from Straus to making slaves
http://doggo.tripod.com/doggchrisdomin.html

this is very good
http://blog.buzzflash.com/hartmann/10016

this is older, more is known about them now that Jeff sharlets book is out
http://www.insider-magazine.com/ChristianMafia.htm

http://www.yuricareport.com/Dominionism/TheDespoilingOf...


http://sociology.ucsc.edu/whorulesamerica/power/wealth....
the top 1% richest hold 42% of Americas Financial Wealth, 6 times that of the bottom 80% who hold only 7%.. so the top 20% hold 93% of Financial Wealth. that is why there is a Recession.. nearly all the available money has been looted by the rich. there isn't enough left to run an economy.


the GOP's agenda is really obvious.. it is simply Dominionism.. they don't care who they hurt, who dies in the process.. they are Elite Favorites of god who hates the poor under Divine orders to control the World.. no Quarter for unbelievers.

the best books on the subject, he lived with them..wonderful writer

http://www.amazon.com/Family-Secret-Fundamentalism-Hear...

http://www.amazon.com/Street-Fundamentalist-Threat-Amer...

the power the dark side has over the government is frightening, both parties. the dominionists spread by 'Secret' Cells, they are known today as "C street", the family, the fellowship and they refer to themselves as the Christian Mafia... but they are just Nazis.

this really sounds conspiratorial and crazy, but read Sharlets book, cheap on Amazon. i have been researching this for a while. they count on people thinking it's tooo crazy to be true. they are organized and spread in secret cells. people who join are often unaware of what it is, and become indoctrinated. but it really explains all the weird stuff they do. they openly admire the Nazis and murderous dictators. it is always rationalized like.. 'yea, the genocide was unfortunate nut they were really well organized'. it was bad enough before leo strauss amped it up with Machiavellian.. economy of perpetual war, a government that lies and spins the horrible things they do. they have studded morally fallen religious leaders to learn how to spin all the criticism away and come out with opinion poles better than they were before they got caught with their pants down with a homosexual Crack whore.

but the GOP believes that wealth/power is proof of gods favor of a man so it is a sin to tax them, and the poor are being punished by god so it is a sin to help them or not torment them. this crap is a product of Doug Coes "the Family, AKA: the Christian Mafia, they call themselves that. their organization was started by a Nazi in 1934.

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