Democratic Underground Latest Greatest Lobby Journals Search Options Help Login
Google

Do you agree with Rhee, Klein, et al. on this?

Printer-friendly format Printer-friendly format
Printer-friendly format Email this thread to a friend
Printer-friendly format Bookmark this thread
This topic is archived.
Home » Discuss » Archives » General Discussion (1/22-2007 thru 12/14/2010) Donate to DU
 
jpgray Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-13-10 02:35 AM
Original message
Poll question: Do you agree with Rhee, Klein, et al. on this?
Edited on Wed Oct-13-10 02:40 AM by jpgray
...the single most important factor determining whether students succeed in school is not the color of their skin or their ZIP code or even their parents' income -- it is the quality of their teacher.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/20...

Sorry, polls are turned off at Level 3.

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
quaker bill Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-13-10 05:47 AM
Response to Original message
1. I am sure that the quality of the teacher is a factor
but the statistics tell another story. This is why I moved into a better ZIP code as soon as I could afford it. I had kids in public schools at the time, and they did far better that way.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
mzteris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-13-10 06:53 AM
Response to Reply #1
2. do you think maybe the quality of the teacher
was affected by the "quality of that zipcode"?

Generally speaking, the better the zipcode, the better the schools and the better the teachers . . .
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
quaker bill Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-14-10 05:20 AM
Response to Reply #2
9. I was more concerned
that the school in my prior district was sandwiched between a homeless camp and an industrial park. That and the fact that they had found a dead body in the parking lot...

There is no doubt that the positions at the schools I ended up sending my kids to are coveted in the local education profession, and I am sure attract very well qualified candidates. This is curious, because they do not pay more, and are not funded any better.

In that they are not better paid or funded, what makes them more attractive positions? Part, I am sure, is prestige in the education community itself. However, they also set annual records for the most donated volunteer hours from the parents, which I am sure is directly related to a far larger percentage of one earner households in the district...

Perhaps the sense that the community actually and tangibly supports the teachers through volunteering makes the positions even more desirable.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
mzteris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-14-10 06:35 PM
Response to Reply #9
10. they "don't pay more and are not funded any better"
so what do you think the "draw" is? Why would they want to teach in those "more affluent" schools"?

Kids who had a good nights sleep. Kids whose parents help them with their homework. Kids whose parents "volunteer". Kids that had a "head start" by dint of growing up in a household where education is a priority, where parents read to them, an "enriched environment" with vacations and books and conversation. . .

And the truth is - "better teachers" do teach in the "more affluent" schools - because they want to and because they can and there is not enough incentive to teach in the "challenged" schools. Which is a huge part of the problem . . .

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
quaker bill Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Oct-15-10 04:47 PM
Response to Reply #10
12. I think I said much the same
However, unless the vast majority of teachers are not particularly good, teacher quality alone does not explain the difference, not even all that much of it. There are truly very few great public schools where I live, which is why I chose my residence carefully. Where I live 80 to 90 percent of teachers work in "challenged" areas.

Perhaps the competence curve falls off rather sharply, but I doubt it. I suspect the results have vastly more to do with the socio-economic conditions of the parents, as most statistics suggest. There is of course also inadequate funding, constant, nearly annual and ill informed efforts at "reform", time consuming bogus "accountability" measures, and far too many standardized high stakes tests. I was once married to a teacher, she moved on to military training, where there was far more money, plenty of supplies, and far less busy work.

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
w8liftinglady Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-13-10 06:57 AM
Response to Original message
3. My partner lives in a "nice "zip and drives 40 miles to a shitty one
there is a definite disparity in provisions for schools with below poverty-level students.
Piss on them-what will they amount to,anyway?It is a self-fulfilling prophesy.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Brickbat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-13-10 06:57 AM
Response to Original message
4. No. It's parental involvement.
It's a lot easier for a kid with parents who do a lot of the "teaching" at home to weather a bad teacher than it is for a kid who has no support or interest at home to take advantage of a good teacher.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
pampango Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-13-10 07:36 AM
Response to Reply #4
7. I agree with children with good parenting at home can (and do) survive the occasional bad teacher.
I disagree to some extent that it's difficult for "a kid who has no support or interest at home to take advantage of a good teacher." It is precisely these kids who can benefit the most from a good teacher since he/she can open their eyes to things they haven't been exposed to. It's difficult to break through with these kids but, if a good teacher can, the difference is amazing.

The kids with good parenting at home can survive mediocre teachers much better than can the kids who have neither good parenting at home nor good teachers at school.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
xchrom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-13-10 06:58 AM
Response to Original message
5. Hell no. Nt
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-13-10 06:59 AM
Response to Original message
6. No.
"Success in school" can mean different things. To Rhee, Klein, et al. it means standardized test scores. The single most important factor determining students' standardized test scores is not the teacher. It is parent SES. We've known this since before tests became weapons to blame and punish schools and teachers.

Teachers are a factor. An important factor. There is not a single controlling factor, though, and teachers are not the biggest.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
seabeyond Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-13-10 07:45 AM
Response to Original message
8. home environment. all the studies support. nt
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
bemildred Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-14-10 07:22 PM
Response to Original message
11. The amount of money the school gets matters more than anything else. nt
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Greyhound Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Oct-15-10 04:48 PM
Response to Original message
13. Well known bullshit.
The single most important factor is income, period.

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
DU AdBot (1000+ posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view 
this author's profile Click to add 
this author to your buddy list Click to add 
this author to your Ignore list Mon Oct 20th 2014, 07:46 PM
Response to Original message
Advertisements [?]
 Top

Home » Discuss » Archives » General Discussion (1/22-2007 thru 12/14/2010) Donate to DU

Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.1 Copyright 1997-2002 DCScripts.com
Software has been extensively modified by the DU administrators


Important Notices: By participating on this discussion board, visitors agree to abide by the rules outlined on our Rules page. Messages posted on the Democratic Underground Discussion Forums are the opinions of the individuals who post them, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Democratic Underground, LLC.

Home  |  Discussion Forums  |  Journals |  Store  |  Donate

About DU  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

Got a message for Democratic Underground? Click here to send us a message.

© 2001 - 2011 Democratic Underground, LLC