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Philosoraptor Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:00 PM
Original message
Why do we still celebrate Columbus day?
Columbus was not the first to discover America. Everything about this legend is wrong. You can't discover something that was already there and already occupied by people. The Vikings were apparently there first, maybe even some Chinese folks, but it's been proven long ago that Columbus was not the first. Yet tomorrow is a federal holiday, no mail delivery, and a day off for millions of Americans.

Hell, Chris was looking for a route to China for gold when he stopped off in the Bahamas, and he left disaster in his wake for the local inhabitants, and we know the rest of the awful truth, yet we still teach this bullshit fable to our kids.

Come on America, face it, we need to drop the fables and get real about history.
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Subdivisions Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:01 PM
Response to Original message
1. Yea, I watched that too. And you're right to ask. I don't know the answer. n/t
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Philosoraptor Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:02 PM
Response to Reply #1
2. I suppose the same question might be asked about Christmas
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Yeshuah Ben Joseph Donating Member (763 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:11 PM
Response to Reply #2
14. Hey, let's not go there!
Unless you're talking about the commercialization, or the fact that I wasn't born in December.
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Kurovski Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:45 PM
Response to Reply #14
23. I love you, J!
Always have, always will.

:hi:
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itsrobert Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:03 PM
Response to Original message
3. I believe there were people here a long time ago
Before the Vikings, before even the Chinese.
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Philosoraptor Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:04 PM
Response to Reply #3
4. Exactly, so the whole Columbus fairy tale is silly
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Behind the Aegis Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:18 PM
Response to Reply #3
18. The Clovis
The Clovis culture (sometimes referred to as the Llano culture<1>) is a prehistoric Paleo-Indian culture that first appears 11,500 RCYBP (radiocarbon years before present<2>), at the end of the last glacial period, characterized by the manufacture of "Clovis points" and distinctive bone and ivory tools. Archaeologists' most precise determinations at present suggest that this radiocarbon age is equal to roughly 13,500 to 13,000 calendar years ago.

The Clovis culture was replaced by several more localized regional cultures from the time of the Younger Dryas cold climate period onward. Post-Clovis cultures include the Folsom tradition, Gainey, Suwannee-Simpson, Plainview-Goshen, Cumberland, and Redstone. Each of these is commonly thought to derive directly from Clovis, in some cases apparently differing only in the length of the fluting on their projectile points. Although this is generally held to be the result of normal cultural change through time,<3> numerous other reasons have been suggested to be the driving force for the observed changes in the archaeological record, such as an extraterrestrial impact event or post-glacial climate change with numerous faunal extinctions.

After the discovery of several Clovis sites in western North America in the 1930s, the Clovis people came to be regarded as the first human inhabitants of the New World. Clovis people were considered to be the ancestors of all the indigenous cultures of North and South America. However, this majority view has been contested over the last thirty years by several archaeological discoveries, including possible sites like Cactus Hill in Virginia, Paisley Caves in the Summer Lake Basin of Oregon, the Topper site in Allendale County, South Carolina, Meadowcroft Rockshelter in Pennsylvania, and the Monte Verde<4> and Cueva Fell sites in Chile.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clovis_culture
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nadinbrzezinski Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 06:45 PM
Response to Reply #18
62. Earlier but not by much
:hi:
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arcane1 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:04 PM
Response to Original message
5. He's the Moses of our civic religion
Sad but true.

Do they celebrate him in Haiti and the Dominican Republic..?
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Philosoraptor Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:05 PM
Response to Reply #5
7. Ask the Navajos and Apaches who discovered America
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proteus_lives Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 05:05 PM
Response to Reply #7
55. They'd say, the unnamed tribes of nomads that cam before them.
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Champion Jack Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:05 PM
Response to Original message
6. Because people like parades?
and wearing costumes?
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phasma ex machina Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-11-10 01:23 AM
Response to Reply #6
71. Because it's a federal holiday. OP already answered the question. nt
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Book Lover Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:06 PM
Response to Original message
8. Because the Italian-American community holds onto this tradition
I should say first that I don't know what it's like in places where there are no Italians, Italian-Americans, or where the old world traditions are dead: it's my assumption there are plenty of places that "celebrate" Columbus Day not as a point of Italian-American pride but out of generalized habit. I'm not talking about those places. Italian-Americans originally celebrated Columbus Day as a counterpoint to St. Patrick's Day, as a day of our cultural pride. Someday maybe we can shift this to (my favorite choice) celebrating the day of Dante's birth, since Dante gave us our language, and Columbus didn't even do his work for Italy, but for Spain, but old Italian men are traditionally hide-bound. I'm working on it...
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bobbolink Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:54 PM
Response to Reply #8
30. Thank you. As a people who also experienced prejudice, I can't for the life of me understand why
Italians can't empathize with native americans, and shift to another day for their cultural celebrations. Its not like there aren't plenty of Italian TRUE heroes they could choose!

It is a simple request that Indians make, and there is no rational reason to continue this useless divide.

Thanks for understanding this! :hi:
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Book Lover Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 10:54 PM
Response to Reply #30
68. Italian-American culture is a funny thing
Tradition is so honored, unthinkingly. Yes, you *would* think that even if the "it's insensitive and hurtful" argument does not persuade, the "he didn't do it for Italy" argument would. Someday I hope this will change. In any case, I am very fortunate to live in a part of the country where we recognize tomorrow as Indigenous Peoples Day, and that is what my son will grow up with. He can easily learn to be proud of our own culture in so many other, honorable, ways.
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bobbolink Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-11-10 07:27 PM
Response to Reply #68
76. What a beautiful post! Thank you!
After some of the very insensitive and heartless posts today, you have really lifted my spirits!

:yourock: and a :hi: for your lucky son.
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Book Lover Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-12-10 12:14 AM
Response to Reply #76
84. Aw, pshaw
I am glad to be of service!
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csziggy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-11-10 01:30 AM
Response to Reply #8
72. Some even have the theory that Columbus was not Italian
That he was a disgraced son or bastard of a Spanish noble family and the whole thing about him being from whichever city state in Italy was just a cover to let the Spanish Crown grant him funds for his explorations. Those explorations and his 'discoveries' in turn allowed them to grant him titles and land.

Whatever. I think it is just an excuse for another three day weekend.
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JerseygirlCT Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-11-10 07:36 PM
Response to Reply #8
78. I like your Dante idea! nt
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JonLP24 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:07 PM
Response to Original message
9. Fuck!
No mail?

Yeah why do we celebrate that day. He was far from the first to discover America.
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Philosoraptor Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:09 PM
Response to Reply #9
10. And ALL the banks are closed, go figger
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Ozymanithrax Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:09 PM
Response to Original message
11. Columbus' discoveries led directly to the colonization of the continent..
by Europeans. Vinland did not work out. Polynesians, who are now believed to be ancestors of the Chumash Indians were assimilated. The Japanese, who may have visited occasionally left no lasting impression. It took Columbus' discovery to bring the North and South American Continent into full contact with Europe and Asia and changed history.

So I think it is still appropriate to celebrate him with a holiday.
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pretzel4gore Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 02:42 PM
Response to Reply #11
43. he was a plague bacillus
that's only thing the pervert did- his crew were dripping with dis ease. But celebrate anyway (after all, our turn's coming!)
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Ozymanithrax Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 02:53 PM
Response to Reply #43
49. Sorry, by history says that he did much more...
Sure, if he did not go on his voyge of discovery, someone else would have, eventually, and the same plagues would have spread. His voyage was what opened the Continent. He changed history.
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pretzel4gore Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-11-10 04:01 PM
Response to Reply #49
74. you're very right
(you know this is coming!)
BUT! History was a kaleidascope of ongoing dramas involving all sorts of 'explorations' by all types of people the world over, with the impact felt to this day. It was bigger then myth. Now myth has distinct advantage over the truth in that it's based upon facts, but, in case of adolph columbus; there are lotsa tough, ruthless and increasingly demanding people such as the Amerindian First Nations who will only consider the crimes of olde as 'in the past' ONLY if the benefactors of those historic injustices stop pushing rightwing fascism on us, and lying like banshees while doing it!
Either the pig stops screwing around, or maybe we arrange free bacon throughout the americas
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proteus_lives Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 05:06 PM
Response to Reply #11
56. Agreed.
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Lionel Mandrake Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-12-10 01:49 AM
Response to Reply #11
86. Yes, Columbus's voyages had huge consequences.
That is why we celebrate.

Never mind that Columbus was all confused about just what he had discovered. He thought he had reached India; so he called the native Americans "Indians".

Columbus thought the diameter of the Earth was much smaller than it really is. Otherwise he would not have dared to sail across the Atlantic.
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Yeshuah Ben Joseph Donating Member (763 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:10 PM
Response to Original message
12. Columbus was an idiot who got lost
And his idiocy lives on today. Not just with Columbus Day, but the fact that the indigenous people of this continent are still called "Indians", because Chris the idiot didn't know where he was.
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Philosoraptor Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:11 PM
Response to Reply #12
15. The term 'Indians' for native peoples is somewhat offensive at the least
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InvisibleTouch Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 02:02 PM
Response to Reply #15
33. I heard a different story on the origin of the term "Indians."
It wasn't that Columbus thought he was in India; he knew very well that he wasn't. But he found the native people to be so in tune with nature and in harmony with themselves that he found them "godly" - thus the term "Indian" came from "in dios," meaning they were living "in god." Heard that from Sitting Bull's grandson, for what it's worth. He also gave a whole different account of the first Thanksgiving than the one we're taught in school - but perhaps that's a tale for another holiday.
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Gaedel Donating Member (802 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 02:14 PM
Response to Reply #15
36. It is what people called them
We call the Deutsch people Germans

We call the Han people Chinese

Many languages use a different term for other nationalities than the nationalities use for themselves.

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bobbolink Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 02:44 PM
Response to Reply #15
44. Its the term my Indian friends use, so I use it, also.
Personally, I prefer the term that Canadians use, "First Nation".
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CTyankee Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 05:03 PM
Response to Reply #44
54. Is "native Americans" not correct also? nt
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bobbolink Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 08:23 PM
Response to Reply #54
65. As I said, I go by what people prefer to be called, and how they refer to themselves.
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AspenRose Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-11-10 01:14 AM
Response to Reply #15
70. It's best to ask them what they personally prefer.
Most I know personally prefer Indian.
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Gaedel Donating Member (802 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 02:10 PM
Response to Reply #12
35. Columbus didn't get lost.....
He knew exactly where he was going. He just didn't plan for North and South America being in the way and that going to the East Indies would require a many thousand mile detour.

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Journeyman Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:10 PM
Response to Original message
13. Because myth has a tighter hold on imagination than truth ever will . . .
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Odin2005 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:13 PM
Response to Original message
16. More importantly, why DON'T we celebrate Leif Eriksson Day?
Edited on Sun Oct-10-10 01:15 PM by Odin2005
This Norwegian-American wants to know! :grr:

Cristobal Colon was an idiot who thought the world was smaller than it actually is, and insisted he was right when everyone teld him his calculations sucked.
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Diclotican Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:51 PM
Response to Reply #16
29. Odin2005
Odin2005

Not sure about who Leif Ericksson was. As the name Leif is of younger origin than Leiv, who was his real name But I know about the fellow LEIV ERICSSON, who discovered what is today New Foundland, and maybe part of Canada/USA today. And Im not sure why not americans also is celebrating his day.... But it can be becouse mr Cristobal Colon had a better PR advisor than Leiv Ericsson had when he was over there...

Diclotican

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Gaedel Donating Member (802 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 02:19 PM
Response to Reply #29
37. The older Runic Futhark
There is no character for "V" in the runes. It should be "Lief" as the only "V" or "F" sound in the runic alphabet is "F" or "fehu". V only came into the Teutonic languages with the advent of the printing press and the proliferation of the Latin alphabet.

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Odin2005 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 02:36 PM
Response to Reply #37
41. In early Germanic languages "f' was pronounced "v" between vowels.
We can see remnants of this in singular-plural voicing alternations in English words like "wolf-wolves, knife-knives, etc".
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Diclotican Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 02:58 PM
Response to Reply #41
50. Odin2005
Odin2005

But Still I would say that the correct name for the nordic discover of what today is parts of Canada and USA, is Leiv rather than Leif as many still is saying.. Either are they wrong, or Sturla Sturlasson and other antic writers is also wrong. And for some reason I really doubt that Sturlasson had some interesting of telling a lie about a mans name

By the way, Leiv Ericssons father Eric Raude, was a man of many talents, and also many enemies. And he is also stated to be the man who discovered Greenland, and it was part of the Kindom of Norway, until Denmark managed to steal Greenland, and Iceland and Fryene from Norway when the union between us was over in 1814..

Diclotican
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Diclotican Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 02:53 PM
Response to Reply #37
48. Gaedel
Gaedel

Posible, but I still wil say that Mr Ericssons name was Leiv, rather than Leif, As LEIV is a old nordic name, but Leif is a rather new name compared to Leiv... So either are old the ancient writers wrong, when they are talking about Leiv Ericsson, and I suport myself to the name of Sturla Sturlasson, the writer of the norwigian Kings sagaer, who wrote his famous book, in the 1200th centry AD.. Or the americans, who insist of telling that mr Leiv's name was indeed LEIF is wrong.. Pick your own shoice I might say..

But of course, an american know better, than we who live in Norway, and have known this from before we could walk, its a part of our herritage you know..

Diclotican
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Odin2005 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 02:33 PM
Response to Reply #29
40. We call him Leif here!
I believe his original Old Norse name was Leifur Eriksson, pronounced "LAY-voor"
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treestar Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 06:41 PM
Response to Reply #16
60. He was not an idiot, given the state of knowledge at the time.
Why in 1492 should he have known the size of the Earth? He was a genius for not being afraid of falling off the edge.
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Odin2005 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 09:24 PM
Response to Reply #60
67. Most educated people at the time knew that the earth was a sphere and about 24,000 miles around.
The notion that most people then thought the earth was flat is one of those idiotic things they brainwash into kids' heads in order to make Columbus look like some sort of hero against "Medieval ignorance". The reason He was laughed out of most of the royal courts is because most of then knew that his calculations of the Earth's diameter was bogus and that sailing West to China was suicidal (people assumed there was no land in the way) with the sailing technology at the time because the distance was to long. It was the less educated court of Spain that fell for Columbus's nonsense.
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verges Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-12-10 12:30 AM
Response to Reply #16
85. Because Ericson's settlement
eventually failed and was more or less forgotten. Whereas Columbus' expeditions ushered in the period of Western European colonization of the American continents. Which, as youu know, we are the by-products of.

I'll even posit that had Columbus' not embarked on his voyages, not a single person on this board (or for that matter this board itself) would even exist!!
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hfojvt Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:16 PM
Response to Original message
17. What does discovery have to do with anything?
Columbus was the one who opened up the gates and brought over the European settlement that the vast majority of this country is descended from.
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Philosoraptor Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:26 PM
Response to Reply #17
19. 'Discovered' is the wrong word.
Chris accidently found this continent while looking for China, so I'm not sure what we should call Oct. 11th.
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Drale Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:27 PM
Response to Original message
20. Because
he started an all new era of economic exploitation, and we all know who republican love economic exploitation.
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Brother Buzz Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:33 PM
Response to Original message
21. Columbus and the crew got their comeuppance
They returned with syphilis and introduced it to Europe.
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Gaedel Donating Member (802 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 02:23 PM
Response to Reply #21
38. Some dispute on that
Many theorize that syphilis mutated from yaws, a disease prevalent in Europe. With the advent of better housing and warmer clothing, Europeans no longer had to "huddle" to survive in winter. Yaws couldn't keep spreading from skin-to-skin contact and mutated into spreading by sexual contact.
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Brother Buzz Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 03:39 PM
Response to Reply #38
51. The jurry is still out
The age of the subjects, and location of the burials coupled with the timeline suggest otherwise.
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Gabi Hayes Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:37 PM
Response to Original message
22. same reason we have a J Edgar Hoover Building and Ronald Reagan Intl Airport.
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whistler162 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:49 PM
Response to Original message
24. because the Italians have a stronger lobby than the
Edited on Sun Oct-10-10 01:50 PM by whistler162
Scandinavians!

I guess cement shoes are scarier than Lutefisk.

Leif Ericsson day!!!!!
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Gaedel Donating Member (802 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 02:25 PM
Response to Reply #24
39. Political pressure
The Italian lobby in the US has consistently opposed formal recognition of any pre-Columbian contact between Europe and America.

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bobbolink Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 02:47 PM
Response to Reply #39
45. The oppressed of yesterday become the oppressors of today.
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elleng Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:50 PM
Response to Original message
25. WHY, really? Ease of rewriting history, AND UN-making a holiday?
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Motown_Johnny Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:50 PM
Response to Original message
26. for all the Columbus day sales
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Kurovski Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:50 PM
Response to Original message
27. Let's swap it out and celebrate the Stonewall Riots.
http://www.civilrights.org/archives/2009/06/449-stonewa...

Right wingers and T'ers will go along with it because they are so totally about liberty and against govt. intrusion in private lives! It's tailor made for them! I'm so excited!!
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L0oniX Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:51 PM
Response to Original message
28. We need to be thankful that Columbus brought slaves here.
NOT!
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progressoid Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 01:59 PM
Response to Original message
31. Ya see? This is just more proof that you libruls hate America!!11!
Maybe you need one of them new Texas history books to straighten you out.


;)
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SoCalDem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 02:01 PM
Response to Original message
32. Because we have done it for a long time, and there is a legal holiday attached to it
Other than a few diehard Italian-American groups, probably most people don't "celebrate" it at all except for enjoying a possible day off with pay.

Young people probably don;t know that once upon a time holidays meant just that.. HOLIDAY...stores were CLOSED. Now holidays are pretty meaningless in a service economy..
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bobbolink Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 02:02 PM
Response to Original message
34. Recommended for Basic Humanity!


All Nations Four Directions March




Denver is asked to join objections to Columbus Day parade content



by Carol Berry

DENVER The city of Denver is gearing up for its annual pre-Columbus Day parade Oct. 11, an event that has placed Colorados capital squarely at the epicenter of a recurring debate about the Columbian legacy and the character of Christopher Columbus himself.

This year, the city-appointed Denver American Indian Commission appealed to Denvers mayor and city council to support its concern about the parades content, which the commission said has become increasingly anti-Indian.

During the last decade in Denver, hundreds of arrests have occurred, hundreds of jail cells have been filled and hundreds of thousands of city dollars have been spent over street conflicts between city police and those who regard the use of the name Columbus for the parade as a tribute to the initiator of ethnic cleansing in Native North America and as a celebration of conquest.

Currently, the Native group has cited the past inclusion of horsemen dressed as U.S. Cavalry members and the possibility they would be a part of this years parade, as well.

The Indian advisory commissions request for the city to distance itself from the parade because of offensive content was also sent to the citys seven other target city commissions the Office of Disability Support, the Commission on Aging, and the Hispanic, Asian Pacific American, GLBT, Womens, and African American commissions.


I believe that permission is given at the link to reprint in whole, but rather than upset mods, I will direct interested DUers to the link:
http://nativobserver.org/octubre-noviembre/articles/all...

For many years I have participated in the Four Directions March, and it is a great experience.... hope to see some of you there.

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ThomWV Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 02:38 PM
Response to Original message
42. Because its not worth arguing about
and for whatever its worth Pluto can still be a planet too as far as I care.
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bobbolink Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 02:52 PM
Response to Reply #42
47. its really a shame that a single post can't be unrec'd.
:puke:
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LostInAnomie Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 02:50 PM
Response to Original message
46. Because of his importance to history.
Others might have landed here first, but their discovery didn't make any lasting impression. Columbus's discovery of America opened the doors of exploration and colonization by Europeans giving us the majority of the societies in presently in North and South America. You can't say that about any of the others that set foot here.
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KurtNYC Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 03:45 PM
Response to Original message
52. because we need a holiday in October and the fundies would freak if
banks and schools closed for Halloween.

It is that simple.
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demosincebirth Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 04:58 PM
Response to Original message
53. Its a paid holiday for me. Lets keep it.
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GSLevel9 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 05:16 PM
Response to Original message
57. so that Fed workers can have the day off, silly :D nt
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Kurt_and_Hunter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 05:17 PM
Response to Original message
58. It's a nod to Italian-Americans
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Obamanaut Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 05:23 PM
Response to Original message
59. Christmas too. nt
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nadinbrzezinski Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 06:44 PM
Response to Original message
61. Because it is an ESSENTIAL part of the American myth
and the Black Legend.

In mexico it makes sense... for OTHER reasons and a different national myth.
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Goldfish Donating Member (43 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 07:12 PM
Response to Original message
63. In Hawaii, it's known as Discoverers' Day, in honor of Capt. Cook and others. n/t
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WinkyDink Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 07:33 PM
Response to Original message
64. The truth? Because Italian-Americans (of whom I am one) demand it, as Irish-Americans (of whom I am
Edited on Sun Oct-10-10 07:33 PM by WinkyDink
one) demand the acknowledgment (at least) of St. Patrick's Day.
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bobbolink Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 08:26 PM
Response to Reply #64
66. You do see a difference between the two, right?
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Book Lover Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-10-10 10:56 PM
Response to Reply #64
69. What do you think of what I proposed up in message #8?
We come from an incredibly rich tradition; why don't we continue to honor ourselves and celebrate someone else?
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WolverineDG Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-11-10 08:02 PM
Response to Reply #64
79. Irish-Americans *DEMAND* acknowledgement of St. Patrick's Day?
I think the fuck not.

More like everyone else wanted an excuse to get as drunk as they could possibly get, and hey, what better way to do that than on a holiday revered by the Irish who we all know get drunk & eat potatoes every single day? Stereotype much?

:eyes:

dg
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JackRiddler Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-11-10 08:09 PM
Response to Reply #64
82. They could switch to Frank Sinatra Day, you know.
I mean, they don't have to honor a mass murdering conquistador, do they?
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cherokeeprogressive Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-11-10 01:46 AM
Response to Original message
73. Ooooh, you need to give the holiday another name then or you'll piss off a whole lot of labor unions
You're advocating taking a paid day off away from them?

Good luck with that.
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MellowDem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-11-10 04:06 PM
Response to Original message
75. It's tradition now...
that's why. The original meaning of the holiday, like pretty much all holidays, especially secular, state-created holidays, does not matter anymore.
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bobbolink Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-12-10 02:02 PM
Response to Reply #75
87. Slavery was "tradition", too.
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JerseygirlCT Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-11-10 07:34 PM
Response to Original message
77. My 11 yo asked me this today.
Had no good answer for him.

Because some people wanted a day off in October?
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JackRiddler Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-11-10 08:07 PM
Response to Original message
80. I don't. Why have "we" got 3 wars, bases in 120 countries and nukes deployed around the world?
Maybe "we" have something in common with the genocidal conquistadors of that time?
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ChazII Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-11-10 08:09 PM
Response to Original message
81. No celebration
in my school or city.
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Rex Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-11-10 08:33 PM
Response to Original message
83. Traditions like those are hard to break, who is celebrating btw?
Maybe we shouldn't have a Columbus day, he really didn't do what they say he did yet it is the 'founding' of the New World by the Old World...or whatever I don't really care.
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