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Americans Decry War on Drugs, Blame Mexico for Allowing Cartels to Grow (52%-"Legalize Marijuana")

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kpete Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-22-10 10:18 AM
Original message
Americans Decry War on Drugs, Blame Mexico for Allowing Cartels to Grow (52%-"Legalize Marijuana")
Source: Vision Critical

July 21, 2010
Americans Decry War on Drugs, Blame Mexico for Allowing Cartels to Grow
As was the case last year, a majority of respondents voice support for legalizing marijuana, but not other illegal drugs.


A large proportion of Americans acknowledge that the country has a serious drug abuse problem, but two thirds believe that the so-called War on Drugs has been ineffective, a new Angus Reid Public Opinion poll has found.

.......................

Two thirds of respondents (65%) believe the War on Drugsthe efforts of the U.S. government to reduce the illegal drug tradehas been a failure, while only eight per cent deem it a success.

Legalization of Drugs

More than half of respondents (52%) support the legalization of marijuana. While clear majorities of Democrats (57%) and Independents (59%) agree with this course of action, only about two-in-five Republicans (38%) concur.

Support for the legalization of other illegal substances is considerably lower. Only 10 per cent of respondents agree with legalizing ecstasy, eight per cent would consent to legalizing heroin, powder cocaine and methamphetamine or crystal meth, and just seven per cent would allow crack cocaine to be legal.



Read more: http://www.visioncritical.com/2010/07/americans-decry-w... /
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sofa king Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-22-10 10:22 AM
Response to Original message
1. Can we finally go back to treating this as a public health issue?
Jimmy Carter was the last President to do that. As soon as that bastard Reagan got in, drug abuse nationwide began to explode, in part because drug abuse was no longer a health issue, it was a criminal issue.

And, as the Republican Party can tell us, crime pays.
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RKP5637 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-22-10 10:32 AM
Response to Reply #1
5. Yep, and brought to you by the country with the most citizens in jail of any industrialized
nation in the world. We seem to love failed policies and locking people up, but hey, many are making lots of money over this, locking up people for public health issues. It's indicative of faulty thinking, but that matters little because some are making a lot of money going after people rather than treating it as a public health issue. It's a revolving cash cow for the profiteers.

As usual in the US, follow the money trail. Reagan knew that, knew that well.
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RKP5637 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-22-10 10:23 AM
Response to Original message
2. America always has a "war" on something and often pretty lame and huge
money wasters. Most feed a bloated bureaucratic system and profiteers. Once money gets entranced into the theme it's pretty hard to steer the ship USA. My entire life I've listened to America with a war on this or that...

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Jackpine Radical Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-22-10 10:33 AM
Response to Reply #2
6. I find the whole "war" metaphor to be unproductive.
Like a "war on poverty." What does that mean, shooting poor people?

We will end poverty when we decide to treat other human beings with compassion and charity. We will start coping with the drug problem when we stop treating addicts like enemies and start seeing them as tormented human beings. We will end the "war on terror" when we start recognizing that much of the problem is created by the rapacity of our corporations and the military machine we created to support it.
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tridim Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-22-10 10:23 AM
Response to Original message
3. 52% support legalization.
That number means that the current law is wrong, and it should not be followed or enforced.

Legalize it TODAY, it's what the people want. Period.
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ThomThom Donating Member (752 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-22-10 10:30 AM
Response to Original message
4. Do we really have a drug abuse problem? An alcohol abuse problem?
Or is this all just made up to continue this failed war on drugs? How rampant are these problems/ Isn't it a mental health problem and not a criminal problem?
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Jackpine Radical Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-22-10 10:35 AM
Response to Reply #4
7. well, I see it your way.
But then everyone knows I'm nuts.
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Oregone Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-22-10 10:44 AM
Response to Reply #4
8. I know many, many people who have alcohol abuse problems
I don't know how widespread that problem is. Everywhere I turn, I often see families with at least one member whose life is maimed by their abuse & addiction of alcohol to be honest.
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notesdev Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-22-10 11:16 AM
Response to Reply #8
10. That's unfortunate, but...
but prohibition is a multiple-times-proven failure. It doesn't help any of those families at all, in fact it hurts them and addicts too by turning a health issue into a criminal justice issue. And that's to say nothing of the way it hurts us all in the routine violation of fundamental rights as well as the enormous waste of resources that it represents.
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Oregone Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-22-10 11:25 AM
Response to Reply #10
11. I agree, Im just saying its not imaginary
Its out there. There is no avoiding it. That doesn't mean I think alcohol should be illegal whatsoever, much less any other drug.
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notesdev Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-22-10 11:14 AM
Response to Original message
9. Hey look a public consensus!
Let's see some drug-war-reform legislation... there's more support for that than almost anything presently on the agenda, AND it is one of those things that are easy calls for the super smart people we have in office, right?
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JohnyCanuck Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-22-10 11:46 AM
Response to Original message
12. Maybe they should be blaming their banks and the CIA.

All in the "Family." Global Drug Trade Fueled by Capitalist Elites

When investigative journalist Daniel Hopsicker broke the story four years ago that a DC-9 (N900SA) "registered to a company which once used as its address the hangar of Huffman Aviation, the flight school at the Venice, Florida Airport which trained both terrorist pilots who crashed planes into the World Trade Center, was caught in Campeche by the Mexican military ... carrying 5.5 tons of cocaine destined for the U.S.," it elicited a collective yawn from corporate media.

snip

But now a Bloomberg Markets magazine report, "Wachovia's Drug Habit," reveals that drug traffickers bought that plane, and perhaps fifty others, "with laundered funds they transferred through two of the biggest banks in the U.S.," Wachovia and Bank of America.

The Justice Department charge sheet against the bank tells us that between 2003 and 2008, Wachovia handled $378.4 billion for Mexican currency exchanges, "the largest violation of the Bank Secrecy Act, an anti-money-laundering law, in U.S. history."

snip

More curious still, the airline kitted-out its fleet with distinctive colors and a seal "designed to impersonate planes from the U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security." And when he learned that "SkyWay's genesis can be traced to In-Q-Tel Inc., a secretive, Arlington, Va., investment group owned, operated, and financed out of the black box budget of the Central Intelligence Agency," well you can bet corporate media ran themselves ragged investigating that!

To top it off, when another drug plane crash landed in the Yucatan Peninsula eighteen months later and broke apart, a Gulfstream II business jet (N987SA) that spilled "4 tons of cocaine across a muddy field," Hopsicker reported that it had originated from the same network and used the same source for its financing, the "Casa de Cambio Puebla SA, a country-wide network of currency exchanges."

snip

Subsequent investigations by Narco News revealed that "this particular Gulfstream II (tail number N987SA), was used between 2003 and 2005 by the CIA for at least three trips between the U.S. east coast and Guantanamo Bay, home to the infamous 'terrorist' prison camp," Bill Conroy reported.

"In addition," Conroy wrote, "the two SkyWay companies are associated with individuals who have done highly sensitive work for the Department of Defense or U.S. intelligence agencies, public records show and Narco News sources confirm."

http://antifascist-calling.blogspot.com/2010/07/all-in-...

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