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underpants Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Mar-03-10 06:23 PM
Original message
File under: Bizarre
More Justice Department appointees who worked for detainees named
http://www.macon.com/2010/03/03/1045886/more-justice-de...

Liz Cheneys Al-Qaeda seven revealed
http://trueslant.com/rickungar/2010/03/03/liz-cheney%E2... /

Uncertainty raised over Justice Department's handling of detainees
http://www.latimes.com/news/nation-and-world/la-na-gitm...

Justice Department on So-called Al Qaeda Seven: We Will Not Participate in An Attempt to Drag Peoples Names Through the Mud
http://blogs.abcnews.com/politicalpunch/2010/03/justice...

For several weeks, Republican lawmakers and a conservative group have been attacking the Justice Department for refusing to reveal the names of nine officials who have in some way advocated for or represented detainees at Guantanamo Bay.

"The administration has made many highly questionable decisions when it comes to national security, " Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, said in a recent statement, arguing that the public has a right to know who advises the Attorney General and the President on these critical matters."

Attorney General Eric Holder identified two of the attorneys in question: Principal Deputy Solicitor General Neal Katyal and National Security Division Attorney Jennifer Daskal. Katyal won the Supreme Court case Hamdan v. Rumsfeld, challenging the legality of President Bushs military commissions; Dascal worked for Human Rights Watch.


Fox Newss Mike Levine today identified the other seven, which the Justice Department confirmed:
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WhiteTara Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Mar-03-10 06:27 PM
Response to Original message
1. Are they hoping the crazies will come and lynch them?
I mean really, what is the point?
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Tippy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Mar-03-10 06:37 PM
Response to Original message
2. They are looking for anything and everything they can use to keep
Edited on Wed Mar-03-10 06:44 PM by Tippy
they can use to keep the Tea Party stired up, but its no only the Tea Party that is biting at the bate...Militas are on the rise once again...These mostly began spreading their anti government crap after Viet Nam..

In a sense, the militia movement is both old and new. On the one hand, militia groups are the latest in a series of periodic flings the extreme right has had with paramilitary organizations. On the other hand, however, the militia movement formed under a unique set of circum-stances that gave the movement a character, orientation and purpose distinct from its prede-cessors.

The extreme right in the United States has long had a fascination with paramilitary groups. Before World War II, right-wing and fascist groups such as the Silver Shirt Legion and the Christian Front marched across America. Later, the Cold War ushered in a new wave of paramilitary organizations like the California Rangers and the Minutemen. In the 1980s, survivalists and white supremacists formed a variety of paramilitary groups ranging from the Christian Patriot-Defense League to the Texas Emergency Reserve to the White Patriot Party.

The militia movement is heir to the right-wing paramilitary tradition, but it is heir, too, to another tradition, the anti-government ideology of groups like the Posse Comitatus. The Posse developed an elaborate conspiratorial view of American history and government, one that claimed the legitimate government had been subverted by conspirators and replaced with an illegitimate, tyrannical government. Posse members believed that the people had the power and responsibility to "take back" the government, through force of arms if necessary. As a result, many Posse figures engaged in paramilitary training. Most notable among these was William Potter Gale, a Christian Identity minister who was one of the founders of the Posse. In the 1980s, he appointed himself "chief of staff" to the "Unorganized Militia" of a group known as the Committee of the States. Gale's appropriation of the term "unorganized militia" is significant; it is a statutory term in federal and state law that refers to the nominal manpower pool created a century ago when federal law formally abandoned compulsory militia service. In using the term, Gale implied that his organization was not only legal but that it was, in fact, a constitutional arm of the government. This argument would be amplified by later militia proponents (Gale himself died in the late 1980s) who claimed that militia groups were: (a) equivalent to the statutory militia; (b) not, however, controlled by the government; and (c) in fact, designed to oppose the government should it become tyrannical.

http://www.adl.org/Learn/Ext_US/Militia_M.asp?LEARN_Cat...
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underpants Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Mar-03-10 06:53 PM
Response to Reply #2
5. conspiratorial view of American history and government
Edited on Wed Mar-03-10 06:53 PM by underpants
That is a mainstay on rightwing radio today

Capitalism (corporatism)= FREEDOM and liberty
Government = loss of rights and individual FREEDOM

it is the same thing Reagan alluded to in his "I am from the government and I am here to help"

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Bozita Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Mar-03-10 06:40 PM
Response to Original message
3. Anyone who understands our justice system is not eligible to work in the DOJ
That's what they're saying.

I've read that a lot of the Gitmo representation was pro bono.

The less justice dispensed by American courts, the more the RWers like it.
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Enrique Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Mar-03-10 06:44 PM
Response to Original message
4. at long last, has Liz Cheney no sense of decency?
the al Qaeda 7? Department of jihad?

Good for Holder for showing some outrage. Let's hear some outrage from Congress and from the press.

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underpants Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Mar-03-10 07:02 PM
Response to Reply #4
6. The Republicans really are trying to "return America to the 50's"
at least the parts the like ... not the high income for the middle class, opportunity, women entering the workforce, unions
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Tippy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Mar-03-10 07:16 PM
Response to Reply #6
7. Could be they are thinking of the 80's
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