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My Bad! Texas Apologizes For Executing an Innocent Man

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ProudDad Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Sep-22-09 01:00 PM
Original message
My Bad! Texas Apologizes For Executing an Innocent Man
Edited on Tue Sep-22-09 01:05 PM by ProudDad
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RI96-eD3rLo&feature=play...

http://www.alternet.org/module/printversion/142772/?typ...

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By 2004, 118 countries had abolished the death penalty, in law or practice. An average of three countries abolish the death penalty every year. The worldwide trend towards abolition of the death penalty is reflected in the Africa region, where 24 members of the African Union had abolished the death penalty, in law or practice, by 1 October 2004.(1) Here are ten reasons for the total abolition of this degrading and inhuman punishment:

1 - the death penalty violates the right to life.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) recognises each persons right to life. Article 4 of the African Charter on Human and Peoples Rights (ACHPR) states that "human beings are inviolable. Every human being shall be entitled to respect for his life and the physical and moral integrity of his person." This view is reinforced by the existence of international and regional treaties providing for the abolition of the death penalty, notably the second optional protocol of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations in 1989.

2 - the death penalty is a cruel and inhuman death.

The UDHR categorically states that "No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment."All forms of execution are inhuman. No government can guarantee a dignified and painless death to condemned prisoners, who also suffer psychological pain in the period between their sentence and execution.

3 - the death penalty has no dissuasive effect.

No scientific study has proved that the death penalty has a more dissuasive effect on crime than other punishments. The most recent investigation into the links of cause and effect between capital punishment and the murder rate, was conducted by the United Nations in 1988 and updated in 2002. It came to the following conclusion: "...it is not prudent to accept the hypothesis that capital punishment deters murder to a marginally greater extent than does the threat and application of the supposedly lesser punishment of life imprisonment."

4 - the death penalty is premeditated murder, demeans the state and makes society more violent.

By executing a person, the state commits a murder and shows the same readiness to use physical violence against its victim as the criminal. Moreover, studies have shown that the murder rate increases immediately after executions. Researchers have suggested that this increase is similar to that caused by other violent public events, such as massacres and assassinations.

5 - the death penalty is discriminatory in its application.

Throughout the world, the death penalty is disproportionately used against disadvantaged people. Some condemned prisoners from the most impoverished social classes would not have been sentenced to death if they were from wealthier sectors of society. In these cases, either the accused are less able to find their way through the maze of the judicial system (because of a lack of knowledge, confidence or financial means), or the system reflects the generally negative attitude of society and the powerful towards them. It has also been proved that certain criminals run a greater risk of being condemned to death if their victims come from higher social classes.

6 - the death penalty denies the capacity of people to mend their ways and become a better person.

Defenders of the death penalty consider that anyone sentenced to death is unable to mend their ways and could re-offend at any time if they are released. However, there are many examples of offenders who have been reintegrated and who have not re-offended. Amnesty International believes that the way to prevent re-offending is to review procedures for conditional release and the psychological monitoring of prisoners during detention, and under no circumstances to increase the number of executions. In addition, the death penalty removes any possibility for the condemned person to repent.

7 - the death penalty cannot provide social stability nor bring peace to the victims.

An execution cannot give the victim his or her life back nor ease the suffering felt by their family. Far from reducing the pain, the length of the trial and the appeal procedure often prolong the familys suffering.

8 - the death penalty denies the fallibility of human institutions.

The risk of executing innocent people remains indissolubly linked to the use of the death penalty. Since 1973, 116 people condemned to death in the United States have been released after proof of their innocence has been established. Some of them have only just escaped execution, after having passed years on death row. These repeated judicial errors have been especially due to irregularities committed by prosecution or police officers, recourse to doubtful evidence, material information or confessions, or the incompetence of defence lawyers. Other prisoners have been sent to their deaths when serious doubts existed about their guilt.

9 - the death penalty is a collective punishment.

This punishment affects all the family, friends and those sympathising with the condemned person. The close relatives of an executed prisoner, who generally do not have anything to do with the crime, could feel, as a result of the death penalty, the same dreadful sense of loss as the victims parents felt at the death of their loved one.

10 - the death penalty goes against the religious and humanist values that are common to all humanity.

Human rights are universal, indivisible and interdependent. They are based on many traditions that can be found in all civilisations. All religions advocate clemency, compassion and forgiveness and it is on these values that Amnesty International bases its opposition to the death penalty.
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HopeHoops Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Sep-22-09 01:03 PM
Response to Original message
1. They promised not to do it to him again.
What more do you expect from Texas?
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ProudDad Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Sep-22-09 01:08 PM
Response to Reply #1
2. And it ain't just Texas...
http://www.troyanthonydavis.org /


Nearly murdered by the state:

NC, NY, IL, IN, VA, CA, WI, MT, MO, LA, MD, OH, FL -- and thats just the A's and part of the B's...

http://www.innocenceproject.org/know/Browse-Profiles.ph...
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Libertas1776 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Sep-23-09 01:22 AM
Response to Reply #2
12. Well,
Edited on Wed Sep-23-09 01:26 AM by Libertas1776
at least New York has declared the death penalty unconstitutional since 2004. As a matter of fact, no matter had been executed by the state since the 60s. I cannot, however, say the same for NC, IL, IN, VA, CA, WI, MT, MO, LA, MD, OH, FL.
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sui generis Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Sep-22-09 01:11 PM
Response to Original message
3. I once fought a thousand people single handedly
on DU on this very topic.

I do believe people should lose their basic freedoms, for life, for taking a life. I also believe we should give them the opportunity to request euthanasia if they'd rather not sit in a cell 24/7 for the rest of their lives with no company, no tv, no books, no cigs, no mags, and just three square meals and basic healthcare, until they push the button to end it all.

However, I AM against ADMINISTERING the death penalty as a collective punishment, especially the way that we do it, by not admitting evidence, by letting death row continue for years and years, and by still honoring cases that were crafted on circumstantial evidence, or that were conducted without mistrial (now that's abominable).

I also want to raise the bar for sanity. If you're the kind of person who murdered somebody (manslaughter stupidity aside), you aren't sane. There should be a SANITY defense, not an insanity defense. I don't think people who have the capacity to murder are right in the damn head.

I think you would be left with two kinds of people: people who murder, and all the rest of the criminology.
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ThePantaloon.com Donating Member (278 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Sep-22-09 01:19 PM
Response to Reply #3
4. extradition
Most European countries won't extradite US criminals back here because of this policy. The death penalty is barbaric.
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ProudDad Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Sep-22-09 01:31 PM
Response to Reply #3
6. So you don't believe that human beings
can be changed?

You don't believe in the human capacity to heal oneself and become a better person?

It's obvious from your comments that you don't or haven't thought about it... :shrug:
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sui generis Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Sep-22-09 03:17 PM
Response to Reply #6
9. it's obvious from yours that you don't understand hyperbole
and jump immediately to judgment.

If somebody admits they got their rocks off killing my kid, I'd want to cause them some measure of pain atavistically, but I wouldn't act on it personally. I also believe in society. Your comment was unbelievably myopic, and well, stupid.

I want that person to lose the right to heal himself. There ARE consequences you have to address before you do the dumb thing and fuck and kill a kid or shoot someone through the forehead for gas station change. I believe non-violent or at least non murdering people do have a capacity to heal and learn to be better people, but the critical threshold is if you have the capacity to kill and act on it.

Likewise, I don't believe that our society should participate in killing, even if we have the capacity to do so.

I want the consequence to be a deterrent. The consequence is we'll keep you alive until you are very very old if you like, by yourself for the balance of your days, if we find your actions merit it.

It's not black or white - I would no sooner do that to someone than fry them in the electric chair if there were circumstances that would indicate otherwise, a lack of intention (aggravated or not) or introduce doubt, but I would also lower that bar a LOT further than it has been in the past.

I have thought about this mental centuries longer than you have sir.
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ProudDad Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Sep-23-09 01:14 AM
Response to Reply #9
10. You need to spend more of those "mental centuries" thnking a bit...
Edited on Wed Sep-23-09 01:14 AM by ProudDad
'cause you're either shallow as hell, don't know shit about human psychology or just haven't thought things through...

I'll give you a couple more "mental centuries" to catch up... :shrug:
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sui generis Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Sep-23-09 09:15 AM
Response to Reply #10
15. OH GOD the brilliance it hurts
Edited on Wed Sep-23-09 09:27 AM by sui generis
you really are a genius, if turnips can aspire, but I'm confused that you failed to make a single point in your barilliant rejoinder. Care to try again? I shared my point of view, what's yours or is it just International Coffee Constant Comment?

I'm thinking proud GENIUS should be your avatar. Hey, quick question, do my eyes make clicking sounds when they roll? Check it out: :eyes: :eyes:
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gateley Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Sep-22-09 01:22 PM
Response to Original message
5. Oops. But I bet W is proud to put another notch on his Totals scorecard nonetheless. nt
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prolesunited Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Sep-22-09 01:34 PM
Response to Original message
7. Just another reason to be against the death penalty
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naaman fletcher Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Sep-22-09 01:49 PM
Response to Original message
8. Personally,
In theory I have no problem executing a guilty man. No problem whatsoever. I'm against it, however, due to my distrust of the criminal justice system. It was actually Mark Fuhrman's book on it that changed my mind.

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ProudDad Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Sep-23-09 01:17 AM
Response to Reply #8
11. "In theory I have no problem executing a guilty man."
That's exactly how most of the guilty ones in prison or on death row feel -- they don't mind executions as long as it ain't them...

I'm glad you're against it though.
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Confusious Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Sep-23-09 04:25 AM
Response to Original message
13. I'm for the death penalty

Only in cases of serial murder. Those guy are too evil to keep around.

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ProudDad Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Sep-23-09 12:41 PM
Response to Reply #13
16. Wouldn't it be better for society
to make sure the very rare sociopath be kept where (s)he can do no harm?

But treated humanly?

Vengeance, hatred, objectifying, executions, torturing the people who've (allegedly) transgressed -- all of these things do more harm to the general society than to the folks society treats in this manner.

Do Unto Others as you Would Have Done On You is not only a good rule for life but would be the best base upon which to create an actually effective "criminal justice system"...

We aren't even close in barbaric USAmerica...
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tomm2thumbs Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Sep-23-09 04:41 AM
Response to Original message
14. a smart lawyer would say the death penalty deprives one of right to defend oneself in court
Edited on Wed Sep-23-09 04:42 AM by tomm2thumbs

as no doubt many have been put to death before more current technologies came to be that would have proved them innocent. so to put someone to death who may have benefitted from technology proving their innocence should be considered the denial of one's right to justice.
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