Democratic Underground Latest Greatest Lobby Journals Search Options Help Login
Google

Hite: Vote for bill protecting gays was most difficult decision

Printer-friendly format Printer-friendly format
Printer-friendly format Email this thread to a friend
Printer-friendly format Bookmark this thread
This topic is archived.
Home » Discuss » Archives » General Discussion (1/22-2007 thru 12/14/2010) Donate to DU
 
madinmaryland Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Sep-17-09 02:51 PM
Original message
Hite: Vote for bill protecting gays was most difficult decision
Edited on Thu Sep-17-09 02:54 PM by madinmaryland
This is where I grew up.

Edited to add comments: Notice how the author refers to "preference" and "life-style". Those are the points of the author and not the Mr. Hite, though he does not correct the author on those points. It's really amazing to see stuff written like this

http://www.kentontimes.com/localnews.html#Hite


By DAN ROBINSON
Times staff writer
COLUMBUS - Tuesday's vote in the Ohio General Assembly was the most difficult cast by Rep. Cliff Hite since taking office, he said.
The Findlay Republican, whose district includes Hardin County, voted for House Bill 176, which would make it illegal for people in Ohio to be discriminated against due to their sexual preference.
While the proposed law addressed only discrimination in housing and the workplace, said Hite, opponents had expressed concern it would extend rights to gay marriages. There was also rumors the bill would require employers to hire a quota of gays or use affirmative action when hiring based on lifestyles.
That was never the case, said Hite.

"When this was brought to the House State Government Committee, on which I serve, I was shocked to find in today's world in Ohio, someone can be fired from their job simply because they were gay," said Hite. "That got the attention of the old government teacher in me. I taught my students for 30 years to respect all people and discrimination was wrong. My position on this was consistent with those tenets."

But the residents in his district were divided. While he received more support for the bill, there were some who were vocal in their opposition to the legislation, said Hite. He met with groups and individuals to discuss the bill.
"I have discussed this with a lot of people," he said. "Some respectfully disagreed with me. Some disrespectfully disagreed and some people agreed. The bottom line was, this was a huge decision. There were mixed feelings, but I will just not be a party to discrimination. A decision of this type was way past due."

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
Zoeisright Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Sep-17-09 02:52 PM
Response to Original message
1. On some things, it doesn't matter if your constiuents are for it
or against it.

Discrimination is one of those things. It shouldn't be hard to vote to make discrimination illegal.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
madinmaryland Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Sep-17-09 02:55 PM
Response to Reply #1
2. One would think it would be easy to vote to make discrimination illegal.
But apparently it's not.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
bullwinkle428 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Sep-17-09 02:55 PM
Response to Original message
3. Does the official language in the bill actually use the phrase "sexual preference"?
Jeeze...does that ever explain so much of the mentality that needs to be overcome, in order to end discrimination these days.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
madinmaryland Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Sep-17-09 03:12 PM
Response to Reply #3
4. I don't know. Here's an artical from the Cleveland Plain Dealer..
http://www.cleveland.com/news/plaindealer/index.ssf?/ba...

Columbus- Ohio House lawmakers moved to shield gay and transgendered Ohioans from being discriminated against in housing and employment issues in a historic vote Tuesday afternoon.

By a vote of 56-39, the anti-discrimination measure passed the House with five Republicans, including Rep. Matthew Dolan of Russell Township, joining all 51 majority Democrats present in the House chamber in approving the measure. It now moves to the Senate, where Senate President Bill Harris, an Ashland Republican, has told reporters the measure is not needed.

Supporters painted it as bringing fairness to the workplace by adding protections for gay and transgendered Ohioans, while opponents said it forced people to endorse a lifestyle that many object to on religious grounds.

..snip

The Bill did pass the House, but it doesn't look good in the Senate.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
DU AdBot (1000+ posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view 
this author's profile Click to add 
this author to your buddy list Click to add 
this author to your Ignore list Fri Aug 22nd 2014, 02:53 AM
Response to Original message
Advertisements [?]
 Top

Home » Discuss » Archives » General Discussion (1/22-2007 thru 12/14/2010) Donate to DU

Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.1 Copyright 1997-2002 DCScripts.com
Software has been extensively modified by the DU administrators


Important Notices: By participating on this discussion board, visitors agree to abide by the rules outlined on our Rules page. Messages posted on the Democratic Underground Discussion Forums are the opinions of the individuals who post them, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Democratic Underground, LLC.

Home  |  Discussion Forums  |  Journals |  Store  |  Donate

About DU  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

Got a message for Democratic Underground? Click here to send us a message.

© 2001 - 2011 Democratic Underground, LLC