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"The Intolerable Burden"

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singingbiscuit Donating Member (103 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Sep-16-09 10:48 AM
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"The Intolerable Burden"
Subject: "The Intolerable Burden"
Message:
This film just aired on the local PBS channel the other night.

The film makes a clear connection between education, race and the penal system in this microcosm of the Modern America - not so very far from the America of 40 years ago.

Go here and click View Video Clip

In the autumn of 1965, sharecroppers Mae Bertha and Matthew Carter enrolled the youngest eight of their thirteen children in the public schools of Drew, Mississippi. Their decision to send the children to the formerly all white schools was in response to a "freedom of choice" plan. The plan was designed by the Drew school board to place the district in compliance with the provisions of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, essential since without compliance, the district would no longer be eligible for financial support from the Federal government. Given the prevailing attitudes, Blacks were not expected to choose white schools. This proved true for all but the Carters.

THE INTOLERABLE BURDEN places the Carter's commitment to obtaining a quality education in context, by examining the conditions of segregation prior to 1965, the hardships the family faced during desegregation, and the massive white resistance, which led to resegregation.

In the epilogue, the film poses the dilemma of "education vs. incarceration" - a particular threat to youth of color.

While the town of Drew is geographically isolated, the patterns of segregation, desegregation, and resegregation are increasingly apparent throughout public education systems in the United States.

"Required viewing!"Southern Changes

"Exceptional! Spellbinding! An essential purchase for all libraries."Catholic Library World

"Editor's Choice! * * * * (Four Stars!) Highly Recommended! Excellent! Combines interviews... most poignantly and eloquently, Mae Bertha herself), compelling black-and-white archival footage, and additional commentary from other activists, the white school secretary, and fellow white students to limn a powerful portrait...The film makes it clear that Drew is a microcosm for what is happening in many other places."Video Librarian
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madfloridian Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Sep-16-09 11:15 AM
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1. I saw the video clip.
1965...I was teaching when those changes happened. Things went better in elementary schools than in high schools. Interesting clip...
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