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ThomWV Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-15-08 09:05 AM
Original message
Understanding War In The Mideast - your comments welcome
Edited on Sat Mar-15-08 09:05 AM by ThomWV
Observation:

When there is peace in the oil rich regions of the mideast the world prospers. When there is war in the oil rich regions of mideast the world's weapons manufacturers prosper. Countries who's Governments value their people more than their weapons manufacturer's do not participate in wars in the oil rich regions of the mideast.

You see where our Government places its priorities.
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mac2 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-15-08 09:07 AM
Response to Original message
1. Bush and our generals
Edited on Sat Mar-15-08 09:22 AM by mac2
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_W._Casey%2C_Jr .

This general has a long line of experience and service. Very impressive.

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/05/world/middleeast/05mi... Instead of changing policy regarding the failure of Iraq Bush changes generals.

How many experienced generals have left under Bush and doesn't that make us weaker?

Is Bush out to destroy our military leadership and American forces for mercenary forces (foreign hired with our tax dollars but not answerable to us)? Isn't this treason?
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cornermouse Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-15-08 09:21 AM
Response to Reply #1
2. Unhappy possibility is that no one was allowed to tell
George and his siblings "No." If accurate, that home must have been h*** for anyone who didn't have the last name Bush. Has anyone ever looked up his nannies, teachers, etc.?
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mac2 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-15-08 09:30 AM
Response to Reply #2
3. They're not the only ones....look at Congress
They certainly aren't our founders. They lack courage and ethics. It's about fear. Fear they created by themselves by giving him too much of their power (Constitutional duties).
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I work for workers Donating Member (551 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-15-08 09:56 AM
Response to Original message
4. My take:
The Middle East is a backwards region that only has any global value because of its oil. It's governments are characterized be repression, and hold on to power largely because they can use their vast oil wealth to somewhat counter the devastating economic effects of disenfranchised citizens, repressed female populations, oligarchic social structures, and highly restrictive economic planning. The region has been plagued by war and violence for the entirety of modern history.

The US cares about the middle east for the same reason any other nation does; much of the world's oil is located there. As luck would have it, the US is the only nation capable of preventing widespread Middle-Eastern conflict. This might sound ridiculous in the context of current events, but it is a role our nation has embraced for the last 40 or so years. The US ensures the defensive capability of the Gulf Oil states, particularly Saudi Arabia, though weapons sales and the presence of our military. In return the Saudis, the only nation with a large enough oil reserve to act as the global swing producer, work to stabilize the worlds oil markets to some degree. The US/Saudi relationship protects the world from an overly sudden energy crisis and serves as a kind of insurance policy for the global economy.

Peace and war in the Persian Gulf has less to do with economic health then one might assume. For example, during the Gulf War many predicted a severe energy crisis. While prices did spike, a Saudi production increase did much to minimize the damage. Conversely, during the 1970's oil crisis the regional was at relative peace.
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