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C-Span re-airing the AEI Q & A with Antonin Scalia tonight @ 8pm

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Democrat 4 Ever Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Feb-21-06 05:26 PM
Original message
C-Span re-airing the AEI Q & A with Antonin Scalia tonight @ 8pm
For all who didn't get to watch it live, this sounds like a bit of fun for the masses. Not often you get to see a Supreme Court Justice make an ass of himself in front of an un-vetted audience. (Scalia often makes an ass of himself in his opinions, voting and for small private meetings with repugs but very seldom does he allow himself in the close proximity to real people.

Understand it got a little contentious today. Should be ver-r-r-r-ry interesting.

I'll tape it for later amusement, can't miss Keith - not even to see Scalia get his ass kicked.
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MissB Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Feb-21-06 05:27 PM
Response to Original message
1. Not to be missed.
Thanks! I only caught the second half - after the two people were escorted out.
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LeftNYC Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Feb-21-06 05:29 PM
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2. What happened? nt
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Mandate My Ass Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Feb-21-06 05:33 PM
Response to Reply #2
4. He got all pissy with anybody who didn't spout
RNC talking points. At one point a kid got thrown out for asking him something about the next time he goes quail hunting with Cheney... :rofl:
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951-Riverside Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Feb-21-06 05:29 PM
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3. THANKS!
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Gabi Hayes Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Feb-21-06 05:39 PM
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5. ha ha HA! ha ha ha ha HA! remember this?
http://www.commondreams.org/views05/1129-24.htm

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia is, supposedly, a very smart man. Indeed, he is frequently referred to as the intellectual giant on the current high court. Yet, when Scalia was confronted by comedian and social commentator Al Franken with a basic question of legal ethics, it was the funny man, not the "serious" jurist, who proved to be the most knowledgeable. The confrontation took place last week in New York City, where Scalia was the guest of Conversations on the Circle, a prestigious series of one-on-one interviews with Norman Pearlstine, the outgoing Time Inc. editor-in-chief. After Pearlstine tossed a predictable set of softball questions to the justice, the session was opened to questions from the audience. Up popped Franken, the best-selling author and host of Air America's The Al Franken Show.

According to a scathing article that appeared in the Scalia-friendly New York Post, "Franken stood up in the back row and started talking about judicial demeanor' and asking hypothetically' about whether a judge should recuse himself if he had gone duck-hunting or flown in a private jet with a party in a case before his court." Franken's reference was to Scalia's refusal to recuse himself from deliberations involving a lawsuit brought by public-interest groups that said Vice President Dick Cheney engaged in improper contacts with energy-industry executives and lobbyists while heading the Bush administration task force on energy policy. A federal court ordered Cheney to release documents related to his work with the task force, at which point the Bush administration appealed to the Supreme Court. After the administration filed its appeal but before the court took the case, Cheney and Scalia were seen dining together in November, 2003, at an out-of-the-way restaurant on Maryland's eastern shore. After the court agreed to take the case, Cheney and Scalia spent several days in January, 2004, hunting ducks at a remote camp in Louisiana.

Watchdog groups called for Scalia to recuse himself -- Charles Lewis, director of the Center for Public Integrity, argued that fraternization involving a justice and a litigant with a case before the court "gives the appearance of a tainted process where decisions are not made on the merits" -- but the justice responded by announcing that, "I do not think my impartiality could reasonably be questioned." Several months later, Scalia and the other justices remanded the case back to the appellate court for further consideration -- a decision that effectively made the issue go away during the 2004 presidential contest. Scalia, a friend of Cheney's since the days when they worked together in the administration of former President Gerald Ford, had participated in a decision that was of tremendous benefit to the vice president in an election year.

Yet, when Franken raised the issue at the Conversation on the Circle event, according to the Post, Scalia "chided Franken as if he were a delinquent schoolboy." And Time Warner chairman Dick Parsons said of author: "Al was not quite ready for prime time." In fact, it was Scalia, not Franken, who was caught with his ethics down. Scalia took issue with the comic's use of the word demeanor. "Demeanor is the wrong word. You mean ethics," the justice claimed, before adding that, "Ethics is governed by tradition. It has never been the case where you recuse because of friendship."

Actually, Scalia was wrong on all accounts. Because U.S. Supreme Court justices decide when to recuse themselves for ethical reasons, they operate under looser standards and softer scrutiny than other jurists. Thus, the term "demeanor" was precisely correct. Legal dictionaries define "demeanor" as one's "outward manner" and "way of conducting oneself." By any measure, with his refusal to recuse himself from a case involving his friend Cheney, Scalia chose to conduct himself in an unethical manner.

>>>read why Scalia was wrong at the link
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liveoaktx Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Feb-21-06 05:40 PM
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6. Yeah, me too, I'll record it but I won't miss KO
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