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JackBeck Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Oct-28-06 03:05 PM
Original message
This freeper wants children to die.
(please, no spanking) I wander over there now and then to marvel at the sheer stupidity. I'm posting this now that I've picked myself up off the floor.

To: Lorianne
"For a start she could lend her support to the World Health Organization's new policies on malaria control. David Banda's two siblings both died of malaria, joining more than a million young Africans that succumb to the disease every year".

There is one problem here. If the people of Africa are so poor that they can't feed their current population, having more children survive to adulthood will make the situation better HOW?

If there isn't a concurrent and realistic plan for improving economic prosperity, increasing population will make things even worse.





10 posted on 10/28/2006 11:38:14 AM PDT by bordergal (John)
< Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies >

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1727611/posts

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SaveOurDemocracy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Oct-28-06 03:08 PM
Response to Original message
1. Bet that was a good Christian Freep too..


They really are sick, twisted, self-obsessed little fucks, aren't they??

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JackBeck Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Oct-28-06 03:11 PM
Response to Reply #1
2. Yes, they are.
I think it's a guilty pleasure here for some on DU to go over there from time to time and just point and laugh.
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MikeNearMcChord Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Oct-28-06 03:12 PM
Response to Original message
3. "The grace of God, go I."speakeths Bordergal
Pray that the worm doesn't turn, freeper.
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JackBeck Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Oct-28-06 03:15 PM
Response to Reply #3
4. Their hypocrisy knows no bounds.
Edited on Sat Oct-28-06 03:20 PM by JackBeck
I've said this before, but I feel as though in a few years, they'll just be a distant memory on the internets, forced to express their sputum in the bottom-feeding world of yahoo message boards.
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AlCzervik Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Oct-28-06 03:16 PM
Response to Original message
5. she also has a terrible blog btw.
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BattyDem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Oct-28-06 03:17 PM
Response to Original message
6. No food? No problem ...
Let them die of starvation and there will be less people to feed. That's the Freeper logic. How do people get to be so cold and callous? :shrug: :grr: :puke:
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JackBeck Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Oct-28-06 03:26 PM
Response to Reply #6
7. In their minds, they've come to a logical solution
to this problem.

No food? Let them starve.

No vaccine or treatment for malaria or TB? Let them die from their illness.

After all, these are children.

Love the fetus, but hate the child.
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Mz Pip Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Oct-28-06 03:45 PM
Response to Original message
8. Wing Nutters are probably
opposed to birth control and condom distribution, too.

Mz Pip
:dem:
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JackBeck Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Oct-28-06 04:00 PM
Response to Reply #8
9. That's because abstinence works, silly.
Didn't you get the memo?
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Ian David Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Oct-28-06 05:27 PM
Response to Original message
10. Global Warming is increasing the range of malaria-spreading mosquitoes
Plus, humans encroaching on new areas of rainrorest for commercial purposes is exposing them to more malaria and more tropical diseases.

If the freepers are laughing at the dying African children now...

let's see how they laugh when it starts happening here.

Starting with the poor white trash rednecks in the bijous of the south.



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JackBeck Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Oct-28-06 05:31 PM
Response to Reply #10
11. If it happened here
Rummy would find a way to make a few million off a vaccine or treament, just like he did with Tamiflu.
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Ian David Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Oct-28-06 05:33 PM
Response to Reply #11
12. Can't vaccinate against Malaria.
Edited on Sat Oct-28-06 05:34 PM by IanDB1
We'll just have to laugh while poor white southern christians pray to Jesus to save them from Malaria.

:sarcasm:
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JackBeck Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Oct-28-06 05:37 PM
Response to Reply #12
13. Is there a treatment for malaria or do you literally
sweat it out?

My job focuses more on HIV/AIDS and HCV. But every little new tidbit about something helps because what little I do know about malaria I use to educate people about how HIV can't be spread from a mosquito bite.
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Ian David Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Oct-28-06 05:47 PM
Response to Reply #13
14. It's treatable but not curable. It becomes a chronic, re-curring disease
Interestingly, human carriers of the recessive gene for sickle-cell anemia are more resistant to Malaria than others.

That means that if there were a world-wide pandemic of Malaria, then, if all other things were equal, black people would have a considerable survival advantage over white people.

But of course, wealth and the availability of treatments changes the entire equation.


Malaria
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

There are several families of drugs used to treat malaria. Chloroquine was the antimalarial drug of choice for many years in most parts of the world. However, resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine has spread recently from Asia to Africa, making the drug ineffective against the most dangerous Plasmodium strain in many affected regions of the world.

There are several other substances which are used for treatment and, partially, for prevention (prophylaxis). Many drugs can be used for both purposes; larger doses are used to treat cases of malaria. Their deployment depends mainly on the frequency of resistant parasites in the area where the drug is used.

Currently available anti-malarial drugs include:

* Artemether-lumefantrine (Therapy only, commercial name Coartem)
* Artesunate-amodiaquine (Therapy only)
* Artesunate-mefloquine (Therapy only)
* Artesunate-Sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (Therapy only)
* Atovaquone-proguanil, trade name Malarone (Therapy and prophylaxis)
* Quinine (Therapy only)
* Chloroquine (Therapy and prophylaxis; usefulness now reduced due to resistance)
* Cotrifazid (Therapy and prophylaxis)
* Doxycycline (Therapy and prophylaxis)
* Mefloquine, trade name Lariam (Therapy and prophylaxis)
* Primaquine (Therapy in P. vivax and P. ovale only; not for prophylaxis)
* Proguanil (Prophylaxis only)
* Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (Therapy; prophylaxis for semi-immune pregnant women in endemic countries as "Intermittent Preventive Treatment" - IPT)

The development of drugs was facilitated, when Plasmodium falciparum was successfully cultured.<18> This allowed in vitro testing of new drug candidates.

Since 2001 the World Health Organization has recommended using artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) as first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria in areas experiencing resistance to older medications. The most recent WHO treatment guidelines for malaria recommend four different ACTs. While numerous countries, including most African nations, have adopted the change in their official malaria treatment policies, cost remains a major barrier to ACT implementation. Because ACTs cost up to twenty times as much as older medications, they remain unaffordable in many malaria-endemic countries.

Extracts of the plant Artemisia annua, containing the compound artemisinin or semi-synthetic derivatives (a substance unrelated to quinine), offer over 90% efficacy rates, but their supply is not meeting demand. A 2005 study published in Nature Structural And Molecular Biology (NSMB) described possible drug resistance, although the finding could help the development of other drugs.<19> These findings contradict other findings published at Plos Genetics which suggest the mitochondria as the major target of action of artemisinin and its analogs. The paper published at NSMB has gained support from the observation that mutations in the proposed target for artemisinins (PfATP6) are associated with decreased sensitivity to artemether in parasites studied in French Guiana by a team based at the Institute Pasteur.

In February 2002, the journal Science and other press outlets<20> announced progress on a new treatment for infected individuals. A team of French and South African researchers had identified a new drug they were calling "G25."<21> It cured malaria in test primates by blocking the ability of the parasite to copy itself within the red blood cells of its victims. In 2005 the same team of researchers published their research on achieving an oral form, which they refer to as "TE3" or "te3."<22> As of early 2006, there is no information in the mainstream press as to when this family of drugs will become commercially available.

Although effective anti-malarial drugs are on the market, the disease remains a threat to people living in endemic areas who have no proper and prompt access to effective drugs. Access to pharmacies and health facilities, as well as drug costs, are major obstacles. Mdecins Sans Frontires estimates that the cost to treat a malaria-infected person in an endemic country is between US$0.25 and $2.40.<23>

There is a problem of availability of effective malaria treatments in the United States. Most hospitals in the United States do not stock intravenous quinine, and with the reduced use of quinidine by cardiologists, many hospitals have no access to intravenous anti-malarial drugs at all.

<snip>

Vaccination

Vaccines for malaria are under development, with no completely effective vaccine yet available (as of June 2006). A team backed by the PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative, a grantee of the Gates Foundation, and the pharma giant GlaxoSmithKline have announced results of a Phase IIb trial for RTS,S/AS02A, a vaccine which reduces infection risk by approximately 30% and severity of infection by over 50%. The study looked at over 2000 Mozambican children.<36> Further research will delay this vaccine from commercial release until around 2011.

In January 2005, University of Edinburgh scientists announced the discovery of an antibody which protects against the disease. The scientists will lead a 17m European consortium of malaria researchers.<37> It is hoped that the genome sequence of the most deadly agent of malaria, Plasmodium falciparum, which was completed in 2002, will provide targets for new drugs or vaccines.<38>

More:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malaria
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