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(Human embryonic) stem cells might cause brain tumors, PER THE FREEPERS

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elehhhhna Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-23-06 05:00 PM
Original message
(Human embryonic) stem cells might cause brain tumors, PER THE FREEPERS
(Human embryonic) stem cells might cause brain tumors, study finds

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1724391/posts
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Gatchaman Donating Member (944 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-23-06 05:07 PM
Response to Original message
1. Freepers give me ass cancer
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elehhhhna Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-23-06 05:09 PM
Response to Reply #1
2. prolly cause cancer only when injected via cell phone
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TahitiNut Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-23-06 05:12 PM
Response to Original message
3. Well, FReepers would have nothing to worry about, then.
(Not to mention a few DUers.) :evilgrin:

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Lost-in-FL Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-23-06 05:15 PM
Response to Original message
4. They did not specify which stem cells
maybe the RSC or the Republican Stem Cells and something to do with rejection by normal brain cells.
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rurallib Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-23-06 05:17 PM
Response to Original message
5. Freepers talking about the unknown again
brains.
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Rex Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-23-06 05:20 PM
Response to Original message
6. So there must be a link between cell phones and stem cells!
Ahhh!!! Get away from my ear, foul technological demon!!! You, who are of the robot race, must be destroyed! :crazy:
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sarge43 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-23-06 05:42 PM
Response to Original message
7. Now there's a group with its finger on the pulse of cutting edge
scientific thinking.
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LA lady Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-23-06 05:44 PM
Response to Original message
8. Actually it's Reuters, UK
http://today.reuters.co.uk/news/articlenews.aspx?type=h...

Stem cells might cause brain tumors, study finds
Sun Oct 22, 2006 6:03 PM BST
Email This Article | Print This Article | RSS <-> Text <+> WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Injecting human embryonic stem cells into the brains of Parkinson's disease patients may cause tumors to form, U.S. researchers reported on Sunday.

Steven Goldman and colleagues at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York said human stem cells injected into rat brains turned into cells that looked like early tumors.
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Igel Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-23-06 07:04 PM
Response to Original message
9. I'd link to the article, but it's behind a registration screen.
Edited on Mon Oct-23-06 07:11 PM by igil
Here's the reference:
Functional engraftment of human ES cellderived dopaminergic neurons enriched by coculture with telomerase-immortalized midbrain astrocytes
Neeta S Roy, Carine Cleren, Shashi K Singh, Lichuan Yang, M Flint Beal & Steven A Goldman. Nature Medicine. Published online: 22 October 2006 (http://www.nature.com/nm/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nm1... but like I said ... you won't get more than the abstract).

But here's the abstract:
To direct human embryonic stem (HES) cells to a dopaminergic neuronal fate, we cocultured HES cells that were exposed to both sonic hedgehog and fibroblast growth factor 8 with telomerase-immortalized human fetal midbrain astrocytes. These astrocytes substantially potentiated dopaminergic neurogenesis by both WA09 and WA01 HES cells, biasing them to the A9 nigrostriatal phenotype. When transplanted into the neostriata of 6-hydroxydopaminelesioned parkinsonian rats, the dopaminergic implants yielded a significant, substantial and long-lasting restitution of motor function. However, although rich in donor-derived tyrosine hydroxylaseexpressing neurons, the grafts exhibited expanding cores of undifferentiated mitotic neuroepithelial cells, which can be tumorigenic. These results show the utility of recreating the cellular environment of the developing human midbrain while driving dopaminergic neurogenesis from HES cells, and they demonstrate the potential of the resultant cells to mediate substantial functional recovery in a model of Parkinson disease. Yet these data also mandate caution in the clinical application of HES cellderived grafts, given their potential for phenotypic instability and undifferentiated expansion.

Relevant sentences (from a couple of different places, completely stripped of context):
... Although we noted no evidence of either histological anaplasia or persistent antigenically defined undifferentiated ES cells in these grafts, and even though their mitotic indices appeared relatively low as defined both by histone-H3 and BrdU immunolabeling, their persistent, uncontrolled and grossly homogeneous expansion over a 10-week span before the animals were killed nonetheless suggested graft-associated tumorigenesis....
... The expansion of undifferentiated neural precursors after host engraftment, despite otherwise compelling therapeutic benefit, poses a strong cautionary note for the use of unpurified neural derivatives in clinical transplantation. At present, we have no data to indicate whether those undifferentiated cells persisting beyond our 10-week survival point would eventually differentiate and exit the cell cycle, or whether they would instead continue to divide either autonomously or with minimal restraint, ultimately leading to tumor formation....

Key word: Caution. They're suspicious that things might go wrong, but they didn't give the critters time to show conclusively one way or the other. Note that Cornell and U. Rochester usually do good work.

On edit: Not my field, so I don't know if the cell lines identified are old (the *-approved cell lines) or not; they've been criticized by some for being unstable, without evidence cited (to my knowledge) that they were unique in this regard. Funding in one lab (Rochester) was ultimately from NIH and the Michael J. Fox Foundation; in the other, the DoD and MJF Foundation. A corporation provided one of the cell lines, used solely in the DoD/MJF-supported lab (did *'s limitation include the DoD?).
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elehhhhna Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-24-06 07:44 AM
Response to Reply #9
11. Isn't the POINT of using fetal cells that they GROW REALLY FAST?
duh.
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Igel Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-24-06 03:54 PM
Response to Reply #11
15. The point is that they can be horsed into becoming any
cell. They also grow fast, but that's a decided drawback. It's been known for a long time that embryonic stem cells have a tendency to go a bit wild in the lab. A responsible researcher would anticipate this in transplants, and look for pre-cancerous growth. Adult stem cells have built-in mechanisms that should trigger cell-death if they go wild; there's a minor claim voiced recently that metastases are precisely when stem cells go cancerous.
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elehhhhna Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-25-06 07:48 AM
Response to Reply #9
19. fyi -- if you google text (in quotation marks) from the article, oftentimes
you can access it (& copy it) from a "cached" selection.
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smirkymonkey Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-23-06 07:43 PM
Response to Original message
10. ... and they should know.
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originalpckelly Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-24-06 08:25 AM
Response to Original message
12. People have assumed that stem cell research would yield cures...
and that assumption is as bad as the one that it would never yield cures.

People on both sides of the political spectrum have seized upon this and made science ideological, something science is totally opposed to.

This really shouldn't have been a political issue, ever. We don't talk about chemo, antibiotics, and other medical treatments/research in a political context, we simply let science happen. There will always be ethical debates, but they should be held by those with knowledge of the research, not those who are merely masquerading as scientists.
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Igel Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-24-06 03:55 PM
Response to Reply #12
16. Yes. This is true, natural, and unfortunate. n/t
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Tesha Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-24-06 08:31 AM
Response to Original message
13. Uhh, *ALL* human cancers trace back to embryonic stem cells.
Edited on Tue Oct-24-06 08:33 AM by Tesha
Einstein was right: the two most common elements in the universe
must surely be hydrogen and stupidity.

Tesha
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gatorboy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-24-06 08:37 AM
Response to Original message
14. Apparently posting on the Freerepublic DOES cause brain tumors.
IT'S NOT A TOOOOMAH!
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Hard_Work Donating Member (283 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-24-06 04:19 PM
Response to Original message
17. I'm not an expert in this area,
but couldn't this be the problem?

Injecting human embryonic stem cells into the brains of Parkinson's disease patients may cause tumors to form, U.S. researchers reported on Sunday.

Steven Goldman and colleagues at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York said human stem cells injected into rat brains turned into cells that looked like early tumors.

Writing in the journal Nature Medicine, the researchers said the transplants clearly helped the rats, but some of the cells started growing in a way that could eventually lead to a tumor.

Although rats are used in a number of testing situations due to the similarities between rat and human metabolism, couldn't the injection of HUMAN cells into RATS be reason enough for the possible development of cancerous cells?
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Greeby Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-24-06 04:20 PM
Response to Original message
18. Tumors are not a problem for Freepers
No brains, no problem :evilgrin:
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