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How does 'one' become the 'house chair' of a particular committee?

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Mind_your_head Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-09-06 03:24 AM
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How does 'one' become the 'house chair' of a particular committee?
I'm sorry...I must have been sleeping during that part of my civics class (or maybe I was never taught this part at all...)

At any rate, I KNOW that there are many DU'ers who can explain how that all works. How does one become a 'house chair' and what would be their responsiblities/duties as 'chair'?

TIA,
M_Y_H
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keopeli Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-09-06 03:29 AM
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1. well, you can start here...
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Mind_your_head Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-09-06 03:44 AM
Response to Reply #1
3. Very interesting......
<snip>
Each Senate committee and subcommittee is led by a chairman (always a member of the majority party). Formerly, committee chairmanship was determined purely by seniority; as a result, several elderly senators continued to serve as chairmen despite severe physical infirmity or even senility. Now, committee chairmen are in theory elected, but in practice, seniority is very rarely bypassed.

The chairman's powers are extensive; he controls the committee's agenda, and may prevent the committee from approving a bill or presidential nomination. Modern committee chairmen are typically not forceful in exerting their influence, although there have been some exceptions. The second-highest member, the spokesperson on the committee for the minority party, is known in most cases as the Ranking Member. In the Select Committee on Intelligence and the Select Committee on Ethics, however, the senior minority member is known as the Vice Chairman.
<snip>
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'Modern committee chairmen are typically not forceful in exerting their influence' ..... hmmmm, b/c perhaps THEY themselves are being controlled/influenced/blackmailed? I don't know this for sure.....just suggesting as a possiblity for what we have seen happening in our recent political arena.

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Chipper Chat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-09-06 03:34 AM
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2. It depends on which party controls Congress.
Democrats have enough sense to appoint a person familiar with the field and have some expertise.
Republicans use the Bush model of cronyism - a la 'heckova job Brownie.'
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