Democratic Underground Latest Greatest Lobby Journals Search Options Help Login
Google

I highly recommend "Lies My Teacher Told Me" by James Loewen

Printer-friendly format Printer-friendly format
Printer-friendly format Email this thread to a friend
Printer-friendly format Bookmark this thread
This topic is archived.
Home » Discuss » Archives » General Discussion (01/01/06 through 01/22/2007) Donate to DU
 
eccles12 Donating Member (385 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 01:11 PM
Original message
I highly recommend "Lies My Teacher Told Me" by James Loewen
If you want to really expand your understanding of history, this must be on your reading list.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
KatieW Donating Member (101 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 01:21 PM
Response to Original message
1. My mom got it for me last Christmas. It does give you a new perspective.
I definitely learned some stuff I never got in school. By the way, my mom definitely leans to the right, but maybe her buying this for me makes her not a total lost cause. Both her and my dad were definitely right wingers, especially my dad. I guess that's one big reason I was probably more right wing till I started reading more, and being here on DU has definitely helped open my eyes. :)
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
JitterbugPerfume Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 01:23 PM
Response to Original message
2. thanks for the reminder
I have been meaning to add that to my reading list

I am presently gourging myself on Jack Kerouac and the Beat generation

so many books , so little time
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
WinkyDink Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 02:36 PM
Response to Original message
3. Read it ages ago! Heh. I was a teacher then. Certainly gave me a
new perspective on Columbus, e.g.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
LostinVA Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 02:54 PM
Response to Original message
4. All of his books are terrific
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Godhumor Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 02:58 PM
Response to Original message
5. Hated that book
I read it once and tossed it--I felt that a lot of what he said was conjuncture and hypothetical in nature with very little presented evidence to back it up.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
chrisbur Donating Member (161 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 03:53 PM
Response to Original message
6. I love it.
I found the chapter title "The Disappearance of the Recent Past" to be exciting. I've always had this theory that students and teachers were doomed to start at 1492 and by June get to about Teddy R. Year after year. Trust busting notwithstanding, we never got to read about Wilson's authoritarian leanings, FDR's liberals reforms, McCarthy's wild eyed xenophobia, or Johnson's "Great Society".

I never thought it was time constraints. It was controversy. This is why politics(controversy) is taboo amongst people who disagree. We have created a very dangerous tradition of non-confrontational ism.

I'm not saying it's a conspiracy just a convenient situation for the forces that want people dumbed down and isolated.

Anyway, maybe it was just the schools that I went to.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
BuelahWitch Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 03:57 PM
Response to Reply #6
7. You're pretty much correct
My love of history began in the 11th grade when we *did* move on beyond the Civil War. I was fascinated by WWI and the stories of the Teapot Dome scandal, then the Depression. It was brand new to me because every other history class ended at the early 20th century or before.

Didn't get to '60s history however till I went to college and took a course about that decade
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Bill McBlueState Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 04:55 PM
Response to Reply #6
8. we went backwards
When I took high school history, the teacher was in his last year before retirement. I guess that meant it was time for him to experiment. We started with the present day and went in reverse.

It definitely solved the problem you bring up, but it's hard to talk about historical cause and effect when you learn about the effects before the causes.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Sabien Donating Member (430 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Aug-21-06 12:51 AM
Response to Original message
9. Loewen is also a great teacher.
I worked for him doing research on this book http://www.uvm.edu/~jloewen/liesacrossamerica.php

He's a good man and I recommend all of his work.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Ian_rd Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Aug-21-06 07:17 AM
Response to Original message
10. I've read this book, and recommend it to anyone. KR!
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
DU AdBot (1000+ posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view 
this author's profile Click to add 
this author to your buddy list Click to add 
this author to your Ignore list Fri Apr 25th 2014, 01:54 AM
Response to Original message
Advertisements [?]
 Top

Home » Discuss » Archives » General Discussion (01/01/06 through 01/22/2007) Donate to DU

Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.1 Copyright 1997-2002 DCScripts.com
Software has been extensively modified by the DU administrators


Important Notices: By participating on this discussion board, visitors agree to abide by the rules outlined on our Rules page. Messages posted on the Democratic Underground Discussion Forums are the opinions of the individuals who post them, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Democratic Underground, LLC.

Home  |  Discussion Forums  |  Journals |  Store  |  Donate

About DU  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

Got a message for Democratic Underground? Click here to send us a message.

© 2001 - 2011 Democratic Underground, LLC