Democratic Underground Latest Greatest Lobby Journals Search Options Help Login
Google

DU just reached a megabyte!

Printer-friendly format Printer-friendly format
Printer-friendly format Email this thread to a friend
Printer-friendly format Bookmark this thread
This topic is archived.
Home » Discuss » Archives » General Discussion (01/01/06 through 01/22/2007) Donate to DU
 
evlbstrd Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 04:26 AM
Original message
DU just reached a megabyte!
Hooray, 1024! Hooray beer!
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
Omphaloskepsis Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 04:32 AM
Response to Original message
1. I don't know what the fuck you are talking about..
Edited on Sun Aug-20-06 04:35 AM by Omphaloskepsis
I will have a smoke and throw a empty beer can at my sister. A milestone is a milestone.


edit -- 1024 nerdy RAM numbers.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
evlbstrd Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 04:45 AM
Response to Reply #1
3. Number of donations.
Kiss your sister for me.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
NNN0LHI Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 05:09 PM
Response to Reply #1
21. I am going to have my smoke now
Throw an empty beer can at your sister for me too.

Don
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Skip Intro Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 04:35 AM
Response to Original message
2. Hooray Beer!
Edited on Sun Aug-20-06 04:35 AM by Skip Intro
:toast:
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
evlbstrd Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 04:47 AM
Response to Reply #2
4. Thank you!
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Dick Diver Donating Member (158 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 06:03 AM
Response to Original message
5. ummm, 1024 is not a megabyte
It's a kilobyte.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Random_Australian Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 06:06 AM
Response to Reply #5
6. Wow, sharp! (sort of).
Welcome to DU!
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
evlbstrd Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 11:01 AM
Response to Reply #5
10. d'oh!
I majored in art.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
hootinholler Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 01:39 PM
Response to Reply #5
13. Agreed, but
Edited on Sun Aug-20-06 01:46 PM by hootinholler
1000 is a kilo. 1024 is a convienient representation of 1000, base 2 or 10000000000 base 2, which is the overflow condition from 1111111111 base 2, an engineering convenience if you will. It's comonly called a binary K.

Nothing to do with bytes or bits.

-Hoot
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Blackthorn Donating Member (675 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 08:21 PM
Response to Reply #5
26. Ummmm 1024 kilobits is a megabyte.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
whistle Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 07:38 AM
Response to Original message
7. Correction, I believe that would be one kilobyte....
....kilo = 1,000
....mega = 1,000,000

Now, someone please explain what a byte is and please don't say 8 bits or 16 nibbles. :hippie:
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
evlbstrd Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 11:02 AM
Response to Reply #7
11. Now you've gone and done it.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Crabby Appleton Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 09:32 AM
Response to Original message
8. The binary prefixes used in computing
kilo = 210 = 1,024
mega = 220 = 1,048,576
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
warrior1 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 09:32 AM
Response to Reply #8
9. my head is hurting
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
whistle Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 01:18 PM
Response to Reply #8
12. Thank you and the byte would be 2 (3) = 8 bits so what is a nibble
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
hootinholler Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 01:42 PM
Response to Reply #12
14. A byte is 2^8
Edited on Sun Aug-20-06 01:44 PM by hootinholler
Edit to say a byte is an amount of memory that can hold values up to 2^8.

Maximum count is 256 base 10.

A nibble is 2^4 or 4 bits each bit is one place base two.

-Hoot
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
whistle Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 02:00 PM
Response to Reply #14
15. the 2 (hat) 8 symbol equals what? That is not the same as the
exponential value stated earlier then, correct? Now to really make myself dizzy, what's a word in digital computing? (When the student is ready the teacher will appear)
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
hootinholler Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 02:32 PM
Response to Reply #15
16. It's ^ simply a shorthand to enter exponentiation
So that should be read as 2 to the 8th.

A word is an arbitrary length, based on the width of the part of the processor that holds numbers while you 'arithmetic' them, it also usually indicates how much memory can be addressed before memory banking or swapping schemes come into play. Usually words are a multiples of 8, but, I've worked on machines with a 35 bit word size.

In intel architecture, word sizes started at 8 bits, and now are 64 bits on the most modern chips. (Intel may have 128 bit word processors, I don't keep up with them closely)

-Hoot
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
whistle Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 05:04 PM
Response to Reply #16
19. Please bear with me, so a byte becomes 2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2=256bits
...is that correct? The nibble then is 2x2x2x2= 16bits. Ah ha. It's scary to think Diebold could have digital illiterate people like me maintaining and even programming the electronic voting machines. Yikes! Thanks for the digital lesson.

Oh, I don't seem to have the ^ key on my keyboard....oh wait a minute it's above the 6 like so ^. Does that mean if I enter a 2^8 in a program (i.e Excel) it will perform the exponential function correctly? Guess I should try it..... oh wow, it works!!!! :bounce:

I owe you a root beer Hoot :toast:
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
hootinholler Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 06:04 PM
Response to Reply #19
23. Not quite, it's base 2 arithmetic.
One bit can be a one or a zero, and can hold 2 values. A byte is 8 bits hooked up together and can hold 256 unique values, 0 through 255 inclusive.

Consider a byte set to: 00000000
Then if we keep adding 1 to the value it becomes 00000001, 00000010, 00000011, ... 11111110, 11111101, 11111110, 11111111
Which are decimal (base 10) values: 0,1,2,3,...,252,253,254,255

256 bits can hold a fairly big number, 2^256 = 33554432

So, 2^(number of bits) is how many values other than 0 a specific memory width can hold.

-Hoot
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
whistle Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 06:10 PM
Response to Reply #23
24. Ahaaa, I understand, but now I am on the cusp of IOL....
...information over-load. I need an incubation period for it all to hatch and bloom. Thanks for all of your help.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
hootinholler Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 08:20 PM
Response to Reply #24
25. Well if you really have it you'll spot my error in the above post.
Edited on Sun Aug-20-06 08:20 PM by hootinholler
It's really simple think digits. Base 10 how many digits does it take to be able to express 1000 values? 3: 000-999 In base 2, it takes 8 digits to express 256 values.

Next lesson is octal (base 8).

-hoot
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Crabby Appleton Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 03:03 PM
Response to Reply #15
17. A computer's word length
depends of the architecture (i.e. hardware) of the computer and represents the size in bits of data that is manipulated as a group. For instance in x86-based computers it is generally the size of the CPU's registers 16, 32, or 64 bits.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
whistle Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 05:08 PM
Response to Reply #17
20. Great people here on DU, I think there are enough computer
...literate folks here that if we all took one voting precinct in the country this November, the electronic voting machine cheating could be at least nuetralized if not not even overturned. Thanks Crabby.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Deja Q Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 03:07 PM
Response to Original message
18. Will somebody put this kilobyte post in the lounge?
megabyte = one thousand twenty four kilobytes.

kilobyte = one thousand twenty four bytes.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Wonk Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 05:14 PM
Response to Reply #18
22. one byte = 8 bits
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
DU AdBot (1000+ posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view 
this author's profile Click to add 
this author to your buddy list Click to add 
this author to your Ignore list Fri Jul 25th 2014, 06:43 AM
Response to Original message
Advertisements [?]
 Top

Home » Discuss » Archives » General Discussion (01/01/06 through 01/22/2007) Donate to DU

Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.1 Copyright 1997-2002 DCScripts.com
Software has been extensively modified by the DU administrators


Important Notices: By participating on this discussion board, visitors agree to abide by the rules outlined on our Rules page. Messages posted on the Democratic Underground Discussion Forums are the opinions of the individuals who post them, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Democratic Underground, LLC.

Home  |  Discussion Forums  |  Journals |  Store  |  Donate

About DU  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

Got a message for Democratic Underground? Click here to send us a message.

© 2001 - 2011 Democratic Underground, LLC