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A question on social rules. Please excuse my ignorance.

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ChairmanAgnostic Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jul-11-06 03:54 PM
Original message
A question on social rules. Please excuse my ignorance.
What is the purpose of giving your boss your resignation, and more importantly, what "rules" permit the boss to refuse to accept it?

An example. Let's say that some GOP members of the administration or DOD realize just how badly served the country, their posts, the people at large have been by this malordorous, officious, and law-breaking administration. Let's say that this pique of conscience hits them so hard that they decide to quit in protest. Let's say the president refuses to accept the resignation because he refuses to be embarrassed by underlings who now understand that he is an evil, power-hungry, despicable and untruthful collection of rotting refuse located next to an open cistern on a dank, hot, humid, summer day. What happens to the now awake and aware aide who has his resignation rejected? Must he/she continue to work on the shrub's behalf?

I suspect under normal circumstances, back when we had privacy, constitutional protections, the rule of law, (not the law of bush) and rational ways of dealing with society's ills, the resignation would trump the rejection. Today, with the slow, but steady growth of our fascist police state, I wonder if that still holds true.
I appreciate any insight into this. I do recognize that the chances of a GOP aide realizing the above is quite slight, but my curiosity still remains alive.
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Phx_Dem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jul-11-06 03:58 PM
Response to Original message
1. I don't think any manager can refuse a resignation
but who knows with the gov.
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eyesroll Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jul-11-06 04:00 PM
Response to Original message
2. Every employment contract has a way to terminate it. Absent a contract,
you can quit when you want.

In other words, while a boss can put pressure on his/her employees to remain, *forcing* someone to keep the job would require going around the law (i.e. blackmail, extortion, kidnapping). It's not out of the realm of possibility, but it's unlikely, as I don't think Bush or anyone else wants people working for them who don't want to be there (beyond normal "I hate working" angst).
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northzax Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jul-11-06 04:01 PM
Response to Original message
3. resignations don't get rejected
the only ones that are 'refused' are when someone is resigning because of a mistake, or to provide cover for his boss. Then it's really only a show, you say you are resigning, and your boss says 'I don't accept' meaning that he wants and expects you to continue working, but he's not forcing you to.
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Phx_Dem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jul-11-06 04:02 PM
Response to Reply #3
4. Someone could reject a resignation
in order to terminate him/her.
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northzax Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jul-11-06 04:10 PM
Response to Reply #4
8. I wouldn't think so
unless the termination process is already underway. if you quit before you get fired, then you quit. Probably, illegal activity can nullify this (but since you don't get any benefits, including unemployment, if you resign, the company will probably just let you go)
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Phx_Dem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jul-11-06 04:31 PM
Response to Reply #8
12. depends if it's for "cause" or not
If the employee is being terminated for cause then they cannot quit in order to not get fired. I only know about AZ though, which is a "right to work" state.
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lonestarnot Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jul-11-06 04:02 PM
Response to Reply #3
5. at least the ones I've ever heard about being submitted.
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ChairmanAgnostic Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jul-11-06 04:03 PM
Response to Reply #3
6. but according to Don Rummie, he offered his resignation 3x to Bush.
I know it is all for show, and Cheney would NEVER let it happen, but he did offer it at least 3 times.
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Caoimhe Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jul-11-06 04:24 PM
Response to Reply #3
11. I've been reading Gore Vidal and in Lincoln
his Treasury Secretary, Samuel Chase (the half blind fundie nutcase) resigned in writing several times. Each time, Lincoln just said "I don't accept it" and they discussed the issue(s) leading to the resignation submittal. Of course, back then the Constitution wasn't just a "damned piece of paper" either.
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deaniac21 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jul-11-06 04:06 PM
Response to Original message
7. Let me paraphrase...
How the fuck would we know?
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Rosemary2205 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jul-11-06 04:13 PM
Response to Original message
9. I had a newish boss refuse my resignation once.
I was quiting because the company was giving me the message my services were not valuable to them. I did not have another job. I was hurt and let myself get emotional.

The rules were a merit review every 3 months - which usually included either a raise or an explaination about job performance that had to be improved in order to earn one on the next review. I had been refused a review for 2 years. (no raise) and was the only person in my dept to not be reviewed. I knew I was an asset because quite frankly I was going all my work and some of the work on those who got raises.

My immediate boss - there only for 3 months refused my resignation, went and gave what for to HR for overlooking me and got me the review. I got a substantial raise.

Sometimes putting one's foot down works.
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ChairmanAgnostic Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jul-11-06 04:14 PM
Response to Reply #9
10. Giving any raise to a bushista might just encourage them.
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