Democratic Underground Latest Greatest Lobby Journals Search Options Help Login
Google

The caulk won't cure

Printer-friendly format Printer-friendly format
Printer-friendly format Email this thread to a friend
Printer-friendly format Bookmark this thread
Home » Discuss » DU Groups » Home & Family » DIY & Home Improvement Group Donate to DU
 
Stinky The Clown Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-25-10 10:56 PM
Original message
The caulk won't cure
We're fixing up a rental we own. We have had two recent incidents of caulk not curing. In the first instance, I gave my handyman some caulk that was outdated. He used it to fill the gap at the back of the counter, where the granite abuts the wall. The gap varied from maybe an eight inch to maybe a half inch, and about a half inch deep. The caulk never cured and we had to dig it out and recaulk.

Now, several weeks later, the shower door was going in. The caulk, again, failed to set. This was new caulk. Bathroom caulk.

The only thing we can think of is that the temperature may have been a factor. The house is at somewhere between 55 and 60.

Any ideas why caulk won't cure?
Refresh | 0 Recommendations Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
Robb Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-26-10 04:44 PM
Response to Original message
1. That shouldn't be cold enough to mess you up
All I can think is (in order) expired caulk (check the date again), bad batch, or moisture somewhere, somehow.

It's gotta be clean and dry enough to eat off of, really, before you put down new caulking. Razor blades and rubbing alcohol.

Next suggestion (if it isn't) is silicone-based caulk, which is a pain to work with, but if you're handyman-ing it out, not your problem. :D Much better stuff, especially in showers where there's lots of water and flexing.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Wash. state Desk Jet Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-26-10 10:46 PM
Response to Original message
2. The depth for one. i/2 inch requires about three passes.
Edited on Fri Feb-26-10 10:50 PM by Wash. state Desk Jet
I know some guys think massive caulking is the answer. Read the manufacturer directions for caulking wide and deep.If for example the depth is half inch,you would expect to make at least two passes to bring it to a finish look ,more likely three passes.The depth is the killer. 100 per cent silicone caulk is always recommended for kitchens and baths.But the depth sort of explains why it cannot cure..Bad batch, perhaps ,-that could be the problem.But the depth indicates the problem. Now what yer might try is turning up the heat!

I do hear people say that they severely caulk with massive amounts all the time and it always works for them! Looks like hell ,but it works!

On that depth, some guys that make shift it use caulk backer rod. It's a filler ,sort of fills up the gap. Than you apply yer caulk over the backer rod. Backer rod is a flexible material ,round, it comes in different diameters ,well rounded the stuff is! It's called caulk backer rod, sold where you find window insulation and that sort of stuff at builders hardware! However some guys are too lazy to make the trip to the store so they use what ever is handy such as newspaper or card board ,toilet paper and what have you! Because they know they want to get out of there quick and they sure as hell don't want to be called back! Ah, handy go lately if you know what I mean

Other guys find cool ways to hide those flaws. I suppose you would call that the tricks to the trade.Anywhooo, read what it says on the caulk container. It may say for depths greater than 1/8 of an inch ,it may require more than one pass- Or it may say if the depth is 1/4 inch or more,it will require multiple passes allowing curing time between each pass.Essentially you put it on so thick, it could not possibly cure itself!
Anywhooo, it's Friday and I'm off to the circus if you know what I mean!


Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Warpy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-27-10 12:30 PM
Response to Reply #2
4. That was my guess, as well
With that much caulk, it's going to take a very long time to set up, if it does at all.

It's nice to have someone around who really does know what he's talking about. :hi:
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Stinky The Clown Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-27-10 05:44 PM
Response to Reply #2
5. The deep caulk was pulled out. I can agree it was probably the sheer volume of caulk. But .......
The second caulk job, on the shower door is maybe an 1/8 at worst and mostly a hairline. Three days and it has yet to cure. This was a brand new tube, too.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Wash. state Desk Jet Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-27-10 10:54 PM
Response to Reply #5
6. By yer description somethings going on in the bathroom.
Edited on Sat Feb-27-10 10:55 PM by Wash. state Desk Jet
What kind of caulk did you use.? And are you using 100 per cent silicone caulk? The stuff runs about $5.00 a tub.
Do you have any leaks around the valves or behind the walls perhaps? What about the bath ceiling fan does the bathroom have one, if so try running the fan all day . After four hours if that stuff is not setting up you have a sub standard product or water /moisture is causing the problem. Did you try putting a small space heater in the room? Try bringing the room temp. to at least 72 degrees run the fan and get some decent caulk.And you might invest in a moisture/mold test kit at a cost of about $10.00.

I wonder if sheet rock compound would cure as it should in that bathroom. You got a heat gun or a hair dryer? You up to a little experiment? By the way is there a window in that bathroom? Is there sweating on the tiles or walls or perhaps a window?



Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Stinky The Clown Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Feb-28-10 08:15 AM
Response to Reply #6
7. There is good, cured caulk in this bathroom. This particular bit was the caulk the shower door .....
..... to the tub. Metal to acrylic. So moisture should not be a problem. The bathroom has been unused for nearly a year and is bone dry.

It was a good quality silicone bathroom caulk. I can't recall the name, but it was more than $5.00 a tube.

I put some sanded caulk on the kitchen counter yesterday and it was starting to set by the time I left. I am going back today and expect to find it cured and ready.

This has been a really vexatious problem.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Wash. state Desk Jet Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Feb-28-10 02:42 PM
Response to Reply #7
8. Well, lets look a Rob,s input.
Rob mentioned 100 per cent silicone caulk is a pain in the ass to work with. That is not necessarily true but you must know how to work with it or is a pain in the ass. First off you need plenty of clean white rags,or painters rags in small cuts. Than you need a can of paint thinner. For those that don't know how to work with the stuff you would need a roll of blue tape. You tape off both sides of the area to be caulked. Inside the tape line is the area to be caulked. you keep a perfectly straight line that wa,,but when you remove the tape, you still must run yer finger across the area caulked to bring it to a finish look. The excess is carefully wiped off with the rags that are saturated with paint thinner. It's a slow careful process unless you know how to use that caulk gun! If yer good and the hole is cut precisely it can be done perfectly in one pass with very little excess clean up with those rags.Experience counts for a lot there.

Now to the clown.After you have scrapped and cleaned like rob mentioned ,I always wipe the area to be caulked or re caulked down with paint thinner just before applying the new caulk line. There are several reasons for doing that. I'm not going to go in to those reasons ,I will just suggest you wipe down the area to be caulked with paint thinner before you redo the caulk line and see if that works for you.On that wide and deep gap poor some thinner in there after you have cleaned it out again and use a screw driver of something to push a rag across the area to be caulked. Than put a blow dryer to it and go back at it through several passes allowing curing time between each pass

Without looking at it,thats about as much as I will think into it at this point.

Good luck with that problem.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Stinky The Clown Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-26-10 11:59 PM
Response to Original message
3. Thanks for the replies. I am going to the housde tomorrow for a bunch of stuff, so ......
..... I'll check it then.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
DU AdBot (1000+ posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view 
this author's profile Click to add 
this author to your buddy list Click to add 
this author to your Ignore list Thu Aug 28th 2014, 08:32 PM
Response to Original message
Advertisements [?]
 Top

Home » Discuss » DU Groups » Home & Family » DIY & Home Improvement Group Donate to DU

Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.1 Copyright 1997-2002 DCScripts.com
Software has been extensively modified by the DU administrators


Important Notices: By participating on this discussion board, visitors agree to abide by the rules outlined on our Rules page. Messages posted on the Democratic Underground Discussion Forums are the opinions of the individuals who post them, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Democratic Underground, LLC.

Home  |  Discussion Forums  |  Journals |  Store  |  Donate

About DU  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

Got a message for Democratic Underground? Click here to send us a message.

© 2001 - 2011 Democratic Underground, LLC