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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Dec-12-04 09:24 AM
Original message
Share a fantasy author that you really love:
I just can't do "favorites." There are plenty of threads asking for your favorite book, song, etc.; I have no favorite. I'm a true bibliophile; my books are like my children. Flawed, different, but all well-loved all the same. I don't rank them. I tend to focus on authors, because when I find an author whose work really resonates with me, I read them all, and love them all. So tell me about a fantasy author that you love! Just one per post.

Here is one for my post: I love Mercedes Lackey.

I love all of her stuff, particularly the Valdemar books. I first found them about 15 years ago; I read a story, I don't remember which one, about a girl who didn't fit her community well, being "chosen" by a companion, and leaving her unfriendly family/community behind for new adventures. That would resonate with me; growing up alone with my books, my best friend being a little mustang mare who partnered me when the world was bleak...no wonder it attracted me.

But I still love her stuff 15 years later. The fantasy setting and trappings of magical people and creatures I still love; it somehow manages to reach beyond the mundane to the best and worst of what we can do and be. But the real attraction, for me, are the plots. To me, Valdemar has always been the ideal liberal nation. No one religion/belief system; all are allowed, but none rule. No despotic rulers, with the king/queen held to the highest standard of conduct in the land. Democracy in action, with the king/queen leading, but not dictating. All of the political, environmental, and moral conflict we deal with in the real world every day, with efforts to defend against neighboring tyrants, make peace and partnership with neighbors, and achieve personal growth and purpose.

Probably, out of the prolific number of valdemar books, I've read the trilogy about vanyel most often. He struck me as a christ-like figure; misunderstood, vilified, feared, and isolated while he sacrificed his life and offered his death in service to his people. I always wondered if Lackey really intended that comparison; the fundamentalists wouldn't get it; they wouldn't read her books at all unless they were planning a campaign to ban them. Pagans might not either, since it can be hard to view the idea of a "christ-consciousness" from an unfilitered lense when you've been a target of organized christianity for so many centuries.

I just recently read "The Free Bards" trilogy, which is not part of the valdemar sequence; it struck me hard. She wrote it in in the early 90s. What struck me was the conflict; official state "church" and official government organizations taking power and setting up anyone who was "different" or "disagreed" as targets; there were actually some striking correlations between her corrupt government organizations and the Bush administration, written a decade before they came to be.
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Astarho Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Dec-12-04 10:11 AM
Response to Original message
1. Charles de Lint
I first discovered him when I was living in Ottawa, where he sets meny of his stories, so it gave a realism to it. I like how he blends everything together, Native American, Celtic and other cultures often together in the same stories. He also belnds the ancient witht he modern, (urban fantasy is what they call the genre)

Moonheart and it sequel Spiritwalk are still two of my favorite books.
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derbstyron Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Dec-27-04 04:11 AM
Response to Reply #1
46. Oh God, yes.
I love "mystical realism" and have used it in my own writing.
He is wonderful.
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-29-04 08:55 AM
Response to Reply #1
48. I just finished "Dreams Underfoot."
I was spellbound. I've often thought that fantasy attracts people who are not a good fit for our societal conventions; people who are always "missing" something and wanting more. The added elements of fantasy feed that hunger or need to go beyond the world we already know. JMO.

de Lint, instead of sending me into a different world, brought the differences into the world I know. Subtly, for those who could "see." Those who feel the call from beyond the conventional. A wonderful collection of normal, everyday people like those we've all met at one time or another, who allow their unique gifts and visions to guide them down roads less traveled.

I believe I'm going to need more shelf room in the "ds."
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Astarho Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-29-04 09:20 PM
Response to Reply #48
51. The Newford stories
are some of his most interesting. A unique world with all these interesting characters. Ivory and the Horn is the next and there are others in the series as well. The most recent (but haven't read yet) I saw was The Onion Girl, all about Jilly and her story.
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WildClarySage Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-07-05 10:07 AM
Response to Reply #1
56. CdL is my fave author period. The urban fantasy,
his very enlightened views about about violence and the vulnerable, his characters and that persistent voice that whispers "but what if it is true?" combined with the mythology and the force of those myths being characters (not just symbols, though that's there too) just completely changed how I view fantasy work. Someplace to be Flying is simply the best book I've ever read. and read. and read. and read.
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Greyskye Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-26-05 05:38 PM
Response to Reply #56
90. Agreed. De Lint is my favorite author as well!
And unlike many writers, he just seems to keep getting better and better. His first couple books were OK - pretty standard fantasy fair. But after he started his own particular Urban Fantasy mythos, the writing, plots, characterizations, well, everything just kept getting better and better. I even love his short story collections, and I normally loathe short stories. I probably find them more palatable since many are set in Newford, (the city he created after he stopped using Ottawa as a background for his stories) and utilize many of the cities residents who recur throughout the body of his work.

His most recent novel, The Onion Girl, has as its' main character Jilly Coppercorn, who has been a background character or only mentioned in conversation, in numerous of his previous books and stories.

Something fun for de Lint readers to do, is to track down the bands that his characters go to see and hear as well as the authors that his characters read. More often than not, these are the best musicians/writers that you've never heard of, and are well worth your effort in tracking them down. De Lint himself is a musician, and well connected in that community as well.

What just puts the icing on the cake for me, is that at their core, de Lint's stories are about hope, love, and the goodness that people are capable of.

Do yourself a big favor and go read some de Lint soon!
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-27-05 06:30 AM
Response to Reply #90
91. This is a great summation;
"the icing on the cake" are the people. The characters are all many-layered, and so well-drawn that I love them with all of their layers and flaws. They are some of the "realest" characters I've found in any genre, and the point is made repeatedly that every single flawed, wonderful person can be about hope and love, and are capable of good.

I haven't checked the music connection, but you've sparked my curiosity!
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ismnotwasm Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Dec-12-04 04:39 PM
Response to Original message
2. Elizabeth Hayden
And I don't know why, I HATED the first book, and then found myself compulsivly reading and rereading the series for the language, more than the story, I love her way with words,it's written magic to me, but I'm not a fan of books with lot of romance, which was a major subtheme....Haven't read Mercedes Lackey in a few years, I have some hardbacks of hers, maybe it's time for a re-read.
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jul-25-08 04:27 PM
Response to Reply #2
120. I read her 2 years after I first posted this thread.
I, too, enjoyed all but the romance sub-theme.

I especially liked the music/magic/creation aspect.

As for the romance, I could see why she had to make achmed so physically horrifying; he's a stronger, more interesting, more captivating character than the dragon hero any day of the week.

The romance part of it brought the story down, imo. The immediate "puppy love" between two who've never met, the subsequent self-destructive running away, the passion that transcends centuries after one meeting, one night of teenage fumbling, and passion for what? A hero that is as egotistical and territorial as he is beautiful.
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Walt Starr Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Dec-12-04 05:15 PM
Response to Original message
3. Roger Zelazny
The Amber series is one of the best ever!
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Norrin Radd Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Nov-10-06 05:15 AM
Response to Reply #3
104. I agree.
My present last holidays was a signed Zelazny.
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haf216 Donating Member (911 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Feb-11-07 12:15 AM
Response to Reply #3
109. He is one of my favorites also.
I have read just about everything of his (I think.) Usually I don't like short stories, but I truly enjoy his.
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Dec-12-04 07:30 PM
Response to Original message
4. First 3 responses are all new to me!
Oh, boy. New stuff to check out.

Someone always gives me a Barnes & Noble gift card for christmas; I'm going to print this thread and take it along when I go shopping. ;-)
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wryter2000 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Dec-13-04 11:02 AM
Response to Original message
5. Thanks, everyone
I'm trying to learn more about the genre, and I always need recommendations. I'm bookmarking this thread.

:yourock:
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Beetwasher Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Dec-13-04 12:31 PM
Response to Original message
6. Robin Hobb
If you love George RR Martin, you will dig Hobb.

I just finished the last of her books (to date) and it was sensational. She's written 9 books grouped in 3 trilogies that should be read in order because they are all interrelated. Ther's the Farseer Trilogy (all w/ Assassin in the title), the Liveship Trilogy (all w/ Ship in the title) and the Tawny Man Trilogy (all w/ Fool in the title).

I can't give these books a higher recommendation. They are quite simply fantastic.
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yellowdogintexas Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-13-05 09:56 PM
Response to Reply #6
75. I just started Fool's Errand! The LiveShip series just blew me
away!!!

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Nevilledog Donating Member (902 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jan-30-08 08:55 AM
Response to Reply #6
112. There's a new trilogy out... A Soldier's Son
Just finished reading the first two, now I have to twiddle my thumbs until the last one comes out in July. Fabulous story.
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Walt Starr Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Dec-13-04 02:37 PM
Response to Original message
7. Here's another, Mary Gentle
Grunts is absolutely awesome!
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BamaGirl Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Dec-13-04 11:14 PM
Response to Original message
8. Guy Gavriel Kay
Edited on Mon Dec-13-04 11:15 PM by BamaGirl
I love Kay's books. I don't feel like I am rereading the same story every he publishes a new book! Tigana is my favorite. I've read it a dozen times probably lol.
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politicat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-16-04 04:32 PM
Response to Reply #8
32. Chalk another one up for GGKay.
I read Lions of Al Rassan first and was stunned. He can write.

Pcat
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Ignis Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon May-04-09 01:28 PM
Response to Reply #8
122. Hell yes. I just wish he wrote more quickly. (nt)
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lazarus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Dec-14-04 12:09 AM
Response to Original message
9. Steve Brust
Fun, fun, fun. Very cool. A unique voice.

Pick up "Jhereg", and start enjoying.
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kaitykaity Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Dec-14-04 12:38 PM
Response to Reply #9
11. I second that.

What you didn't tell me is that Vlad solves mysteries.
Both Yendi and the first book are set up almost like
a Sue Grafton plot or something.

Very cool.

:hi:
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lazarus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Dec-14-04 07:46 PM
Response to Reply #11
14. Ah
I forgot to include that, didn't I?

Glad you're liking it. He's just fun, and Brust is a master at pulling off complicated schemes without cheating.
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kaitykaity Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Dec-14-04 07:55 PM
Response to Reply #14
15. Yes, you did.
Bad you. ;)

Anyway, it's weird how they're not printed in chronological
order. In the first one I'm reading about Vlad and Cawti, and
the second book starts out him being horny and looking for
some action.

I was like :wtf:



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lazarus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-15-04 02:01 AM
Response to Reply #15
16. You'll find even more of that.
Used to be a raging debate as to whether one should read them in chronological or published order.

Brust said that he wrote "Dragon" with people who prefer the chronological order in mind. As he puts it:

"I have a lot of sympathy with people who want to read the books in chronological order, so I wrote this one to help them out: it falls before and after Yendi. Heh heh heh."

No more debate. It's publication order.

One more warning: DO NOT read the back of Orca or any book after it before you've read it. There's a huge spoiler in Orca that you don't want to have spoiled, trust me. And the idiots who do blurbs spoiled it on the back of one of the books, I just can't remember which, and my books are way over there, and my knees hurt.
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kaitykaity Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-15-04 03:10 AM
Response to Reply #16
17. Kind of a smart ass, isn't he?

It's like he's Loiosh. (After all the drama of Vlad's
getting the egg, and how serious Loiosh's mother was,
Loiosh is not what I expected.)

I guess I'll read "Dragon" next. I really liked
Yendi.

:hi:

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lazarus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-15-04 03:45 AM
Response to Reply #17
18. No, no
Edited on Wed Dec-15-04 03:45 AM by lazarus
Keep going in order. Teckla is next, then Taltos, Phoenix, Athyra, and Orca. Trust me, you want to do these in order.

Then, if you're a Dumas/3 Musketeers fan, you can pick up The Phoenix Guard, written before the Interregnum. It starts off a whole different set of historical novels written in an utterly different but just as fun style.

As for Steve, yeah, he's a smartass. He's also a great guy. I've hung out with him a couple of times, and we've exchanged emails.

He taught me how to play poker and drink single malt scotch, after all.

And to finish it off, he's a good socialist, too.
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kaitykaity Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-15-04 04:52 AM
Response to Reply #18
19. Oh, you lost your little person!!

Congratulations!!! How's it feel to be one of the folks
again?

Hopefully I won't have to chase you all over the GD forums,
now that you can argue with us again. You'll still come back
and talk about this stuff. (I'm still so goddamn freaking
mad about the election I can't go into the other forums.
It all makes me NUTS.)

Okay, okay, okay. I'll stay with him in order. It's just
dang it, I like for the events to happen sequentially. I
confuse easily.


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lazarus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-15-04 04:41 PM
Response to Reply #19
24. Heh
My li'l gray dude?

I've gone without him before, but it's weird.

To be honest, I don't change my behaviour much, because I've been a mod most of the last two years, and a lot of people still think I'm a mod even when I'm a civilian.

But I do like to argue...
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kaitykaity Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-15-04 05:26 PM
Response to Reply #24
26. Remember the little gleam?? Argue away, buddy.

Anyway.

Do any of Brust's other Vlad books come in a 3-in-1 like
Jhereg? I can just see me having to intralibrary loan them
because they've all been "lost" from my local library.

You know, like with Malleus Malefarcum and all those.
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lazarus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-15-04 07:53 PM
Response to Reply #26
29. Yes, they do
I think there are three omnibus collections so far.

I'm just upset none of them are hardcover. I've worn out my paperbacks.

Oddly enough, Brust is one that I find hard to locate in used book stores. People tend not to want to let go of his stuff, I guess.

Oh, if you want a nice change of pace, see if you can get "To Reign In Hell". It's his second novel, nothing to do with Vlad. It's a retelling of Milton's "Paradise Lost", basically, only with a bit of a fantasy twist to it. I love that book.
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kaitykaity Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-15-04 08:00 PM
Response to Reply #29
30. I got that the Hell one from the library. It's next
after Tekla. (Course I may squeeze in an Iris Johansen
for vareity in between.) I got as far as the introduction
by Zelanzy before I got Jhereg back from the library -- I
was having a hold duel with another patron.

(Omnibus, huh? Thanks for the word.)

;)

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Khephra Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-15-04 05:34 PM
Response to Reply #9
28. I'll third that
Just because I have to follow-up every Brust post that Laz makes.

:evilgrin:

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lazarus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-16-04 07:48 PM
Response to Reply #28
33. Of course
He's still plugging away on the latest Vlad book. I figure we won't see it until summer or fall at this rate.
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Khephra Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-16-04 08:49 PM
Response to Reply #33
34. I still have yet to get a copy of Sethra
I always seem to be one book behind, so knowing me it's likely that I'll start reading Sethra when the next Vlad book comes out.
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Beetwasher Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-22-04 10:53 AM
Response to Reply #34
44. Well, I'm Convinced! Looks Like Brust is Next Up For Me!
n/t
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porkrind Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-30-04 01:03 AM
Response to Reply #9
53. the "Jhereg" books are great
Some of the later ones in the series really slow down, but the first few are great reading.
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Bridget Burke Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Dec-14-04 08:33 AM
Response to Original message
10. Greg Keyes (aka J Gregory Keyes)
I first encountered his "Age of Reason" series--4 books of alternate history, with Sir Isaac Newton & young Ben Franklin among the characters. Perhaps the whole series did not live up to the first book but I was struck by its originality. Modern fantasy includes far too many Tolkien ripoffs; I'd just finished a piece of dreck by Patricia Kenneally-Morrison (yeah, sure) & was about to devote all future reading to computer manuals.

His first series, "The Waterborn" & "Blackgod" shows his fascination with language & anthropology. The world includes cultures similar to Ancient Egypt & the plains Indians, along with some powerful magics.

The latest series began with "The Briar King" & continued with "The Charnal Prince"--with 2 yet to come. The setting--various European-ish cultures in an alien world (& just how did they get there--& what's this bit about Virginia Dare?)--is a bit more like "standard" fantasy. But his originality continues, with interesting characters, real humor & horrible horror!
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kaitykaity Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Dec-14-04 01:11 PM
Response to Original message
12. Anne McCaffrey - Dragonriders of Pern.

Anything by Marion Zimmer Bradley, but especially
The Mists of Avalon.

Jack Chalker - Soul Riders series (not pure fantasy but
still good).

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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-15-04 08:35 PM
Response to Reply #12
31. I'll second that one.
I've read some of McCaffrey's other stuff, and it was ok. I enjoyed some of it. But I loved the Pern books with a passion. I wore won anthology out; it's coverless now.

And I also love Marion Zimmer Bradley.

I've never heard of Jack Chalker.

This thread is getting longer; I can't wait to go shopping!

:bounce:
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ccjlld Donating Member (246 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jul-22-05 05:14 PM
Response to Reply #12
78. Dragonriders of Pern
was the first series of Fantasy book I ever read and she hooked me. I love all her stuff.
A few others I've really liked are Fred Saberhagens Swords series and Piers Anthony's Adept series.

My husband just brought me home Jim Butcher's Harry Dresden series and I really enjoyed it too!
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semillama Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Dec-14-04 03:50 PM
Response to Original message
13. Fritz Leiber
Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser - what iconic characters!
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Walt Starr Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-15-04 11:27 AM
Response to Reply #13
21. EXCELLENT
but his work has been around so long, I thought everybody knew about him!
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Bridget Burke Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-15-04 02:48 PM
Response to Reply #21
23. He invented the phrase "Swords & Sorcery"
And he also wrote excellent science fiction & horror.

There might be some young whippersnappers who haven't heard of him.
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Orsino Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue May-17-05 07:26 PM
Response to Reply #23
67. Great horror.
Our Lady of Darkness is one of the scariest things I've ever read. Conjure Wife is good, too. Both feature rationalist heroes who happen upon the supernatural, in the best Lovecraftian tradition.
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Sabriel Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-15-04 10:28 AM
Response to Original message
20. Garth Nix and Tamora Pierce
What can I say? I'm a sucker for strong female protagonists.
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Nov-23-09 05:40 PM
Response to Reply #20
132. I met Tamora Pierce a couple of years ago.
I read a couple of Garth Nix books last week.

This has to be one of the longest-running threads on DU. You put those 2 in there 5 years ago, and I'm just now getting around to responding.

Pierce is a likable, funny woman. She came to talk to my students about writing.

The Nix books... I read the Monday and Tuesday books. Will eventually read the rest, but since the story wouldn't slow down any, I took a break. ;)
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Walt Starr Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-15-04 11:31 AM
Response to Original message
22. Gonna list a few of my favorites here besiudes the Roger Zelazny and
Mary Gentle I've already named:

Michael Moorcock
Stephen R. Donaldson
Fritz Lieber


And a few D&D authors I've enjoyed:

R. A. Salvatore
Ed Greenwood
Elaine Cunningham
Mel Odom

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lazarus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-15-04 04:42 PM
Response to Reply #22
25. If you like Zelazny
I strongly second the suggestion I made upthread about Steve Brust. Pick up "Jhereg" and see what you think, he's a lot of fun.

It's nice to see another Donaldson fan. I think I'll start a thread about him..
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Khephra Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-15-04 05:33 PM
Response to Original message
27. China Mieville--best new talent in the resurging subgenre of weird fantasy
And Gene Wolfe.

People who think they need a dictionary to read Donaldson should steer clear of Wolfe. I'd hate to be responsible for anyone's head exploding.
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HawkerHurricane Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-17-04 07:28 PM
Response to Original message
35. Christopher Stasheff
his Wizard in Rhyme series is interesting, it holds a very medieval Catholic view on reality while knocking the Catholic hierarchy at the same time.
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Dec-19-04 11:31 AM
Response to Original message
36. Ok, I'm off to Barnes & Noble
with my holiday gift cards; we'll see how far they get down my list.

I've got 10 different authors that are new to me; oh boy!
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lazarus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Dec-19-04 02:58 PM
Response to Reply #36
37. Get a B&N membership card!
It's actually worth it, we've found. 10% off everything. Music, videos, DVDs, books, magazines. And you get specials ordering online and stuff.
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Dec-19-04 06:48 PM
Response to Reply #37
38. I've got one; it helped a lot today.
Why? Because I spent 5 X the amount on my gift card. I'm supposed to be finishing off a bunch of professional literature, but let's see...

a stack of brand new fantasy novels, or time spent thinking/reading about work while I'm on vacation... tough choice. :eyes:

I didn't get all of the authors on my list; they weren't all there. But I got a bunch. Those new to me that I ended up with include:

de Lint
Hobb
Zelazny
Brust
Hayden
Keyes

Along with a couple more from Lackey and one from Sheri Tepper; neither new to me. And a few titles that aren't in the fantasy genre.

I can't decide where to start tonight. What a dilemma!
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lazarus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Dec-20-04 04:30 PM
Response to Reply #38
40. PM me
with your opinion on Brust. You did start with Jhereg, right? Those are critical to be read in order.
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Dec-21-04 10:08 AM
Response to Reply #40
42. Will do.
I got Jhereg, and will be diving in by this weekend.
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-29-04 08:47 AM
Response to Reply #42
47. I finished Jehreg
a couple of days ago and am just now checking in.

It had several different "twists" for me:

Following a story from the pov of an assassin really forced my brain onto a new path, rather than old well-traveled paths.

There is an interesting contrast between the "otherworldly" feel to the city, the usual lack of our modern technology, the non-human creatures, sorcerers, etc., and the personalities of the characters. I think the characters would have done just fine plunked down in any modern U.S. city. Definitely an "urban" feel to it. And, while they didn't have ipods, palm pilots, or cell phones, they had their own brand of technology. So even in the "fantasy" setting, it had a modern feel to it.

My youngest son is making his holiday visit this weekend and will be looking over the stacks I picked up since his last visit; this one is first on his recommended list. I'm eager to hear his take on it.
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lazarus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-29-04 03:01 PM
Response to Reply #47
50. Interesting viewpoint
I agree, although I hadn't thought about it. The characters do have a modern touch, with an urban feel.

Glad you enjoyed it. The rest of the series just gets better and better, he's really grown as an author.
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Walt Starr Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Dec-20-04 08:53 AM
Response to Original message
39. Here's a weird one
Gene Wolfe
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mzteris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Oct-21-05 08:07 AM
Response to Reply #39
87. ok - this is weird
I just clicked onto this thread and was scrolling look for Gene Wolfe's name - and clicked on your "Here's a weird one" - et voila - there was Wolfe. Now THAT's weird.

I liked Soldier of the Myst a lot. And the Torturer series - well - I didn't LIKE it - but I had to read it, ya know? - it was masterfully done. It's hard to explain. (sigh)

Another weird one? Samuel R. Delaney - though he's more SF than F.
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davidinalameda Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Dec-20-04 05:21 PM
Response to Original message
41. Mercedes Lackey is probably my favorite as well
there is no other author that I collect as much as I do her

I just enjoy reading her works so much

and I agree with everything you posted

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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-22-04 08:30 AM
Response to Reply #41
43. Yes.
While I was shopping for new authors, I managed to come home with a couple more of hers; one reason my shopping bill was too large. ;-)
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davidinalameda Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-23-04 11:11 AM
Response to Original message
45. Christopher Golden
I recently discovered him--he writes "dark fantasy"--vampires, demons and the such

He has a trilogy--The Shadow Saga

I've read the first book and am currently working on the 2nd--he has taken what I feel is a tired old genre and really zipped it up

he's thrown out all the standard vampire cliches--he's a fantastic writer and his characters jump off the page
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NewJeffCT Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-29-04 01:08 PM
Response to Original message
49. George R.R. Martin
So far, his Song of Fire & Ice series is a welcome change from the typical "young innocents on a quest to save the world" that everybody seems to write about...

And, he is a loyal Democrat - check out his website:

http://www.georgerrmartin.com /

and then read "Unbowed Unbent Unbroken"



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Orsino Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue May-17-05 07:30 PM
Response to Reply #49
68. Exhausting.
A Game of Thrones was wonderful (its intro is truly frightening). The wait for the sequel was so damned long, however, that I would have needed to read it all over again. I just don't have the energy for that.

My wife likes 'em enough to buy hardbacks.
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porkrind Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-30-04 01:00 AM
Response to Original message
52. I really like Mercedes Lackey
I'm glad you mentioned her. I guess it's the covers of her books, but everytime I buy them I can't help being somewhat embarrassed thinking they look super-cheesy. She is a very under-valued writer, IMHO.
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Walt Starr Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-31-04 04:35 PM
Response to Original message
54. WOW, Michael Moorcock still hasn't shown up!
Well, he has now! Elric of Melnibone' is my favorite, but the Hawkmoon and corum series are great too! I love the Champion Eternal!
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-01-05 06:57 PM
Response to Reply #54
55. Another that I haven't heard of.
I'll be reading all year just off of this thread, at the rate I'm going!

:hi:
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-08-08 02:05 PM
Response to Reply #54
116. Walt, if you ever check back in to read:
I saw that this thread had been kicked again this morning, and checked in to read what was new.

I'm amazed that a thread is still active 4 years later, and saddened to see the posters who are no longer with us, for various reasons.

The new books I bought back in '04 as a result of this thread were long ago read and placed on the shelf, or sent on to new people, and I'm STILL in the market for new stuff.

I pop in here because someone just mentioned Michael Moorcock to me last week; one of my students. He's mentioned him a few times, and I kept thinking that "Michael Moorcock" sounded familiar, but I couldn't remember where I'd heard of him.

Now I know; it was you! I'll have to add Moorcock to my next trip. I just, two weeks ago, spent the last of my xmas gift cards at B&N, so I'll have to save up for another trip.
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Bridget Burke Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-07-05 02:28 PM
Response to Original message
57. Am I the first to mention Tim Powers?
Generally, he writes two sorts of fantasy--more recently, in a "contemporary" setting. There's a trilogy beginning with "Last Call" (The Fisher King goes to Vegas) & "Declare" (The Occult Truth behind The Cold War).

Even better are his historical fantasies, such as "The Anubis Gates" (Time Travel, Ancient Egyptian Mysteries & The Romantic Poets) & "On Stranger Tides" (Zombie Pirates of the Caribbean).



Literate, entertaining & highly original fantasy for those who've tossed yet another 3rd rate Tolkien wannabee into the garbage.
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-09-05 09:17 AM
Response to Reply #57
58. Good recommendation;
I haven't heard of him, but I'll check him out!
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Orsino Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu May-26-05 05:53 PM
Response to Reply #57
70. Fantastic.
I was a little let down by Anubis Gates, perhaps because it was merely good sci-fi rather than being terrific fantasy. The rest all rock.

He's one of the few authors I've met. I fawned over him for a few moments at DragonCon '01, complimenting him on that amazing Fisher King mythology that runs through most of his books.

Drawing of the Dark and Last Call may be his best.
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haele Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jun-26-10 12:15 AM
Response to Reply #57
133. I'm late in this thread - 2010 already? but Tim Powers had an earlier Fisher King story -
"The Drawing of the Dark" - set in 16th century Italy/Vienna. Lots of humor, historical tidbits and a very wry, dark flavor to it - and it's a very complete stand-alone.
I'd like to see Benicio Del Toro do a movie on this, it would fit in so well with his dark fairie tale vision.

Haele
(daubing my eyes a bit seeing Keph's posts up thread - he and Laz used to have long phone calls and were making plans to get together when he died)
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jul-04-10 08:45 PM
Response to Reply #133
135. I'm putting together a summer reading list,
so I popped back in to see if anything has been added to what has to be one of the longest running threads on DU, ever, lol.

Thank you, and the poster you replied to, for something new to look for!
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malmapus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Apr-20-05 09:45 AM
Response to Original message
59. Can't believe I'm first to say Margaret Weiss and Tracy Hickman
Who brought us the tales of Rastlin in the Dragonlance series.

Soulforge is what rekindled my love of fantasy novels. Their writing styles just really keep you from being able to put the book down.
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XemaSab Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Apr-20-05 04:49 PM
Response to Original message
60. Philip Pullman
Tamora Pierce and JK Rowling.
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davidinalameda Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Apr-20-05 06:37 PM
Response to Reply #60
61. the only Pullman I've read is Dark Materials trilogy
and honestly, I didn't care for it

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XemaSab Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Apr-20-05 09:26 PM
Response to Reply #61
62. It's okay
I thought LOTR was DEADLY dull.
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davidinalameda Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-21-05 12:17 AM
Response to Reply #62
63. I have never been able to get through LOTR
I've watched all three moves and love them but the book bores me to tears

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WritingIsMyReligion Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Apr-11-06 02:32 PM
Response to Reply #60
101. LOL! Here's to them!
All some of my favorites, as well.

:toast:
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Matilda Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-28-05 02:50 AM
Response to Original message
64. Susan Cooper,
who wrote The Dark Is Rising series.

She's English; I don't know if her books have been released in
the U.S.
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue May-10-05 06:56 AM
Response to Reply #64
65. I've read the Dark is Rising series;
it's been here in the U.S. since my sons were kids, at least. I don't know that I've seen any other work by her.

I enjoyed the Dark is Rising, and still recommend it to my more advanced students when they are looking for a good read.
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AbbyR Donating Member (734 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-19-05 03:33 PM
Response to Reply #64
83. The Dark is Rising...
My very favorite series - I love it and I'm long since grown up.
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Orsino Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue May-17-05 07:23 PM
Response to Original message
66. Neil Gaiman
Besides his Sandman comic--one of the finest things I've read in any medium--there is the elegant Neverwhere and the oddly spooky Coraline (ostensibly a kids' book). American Gods was merely good.
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Withywindle Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat May-21-05 09:14 PM
Response to Reply #66
69. been thinking about him a lot lately
...because I decided to slog through Left Behind in that "know your enemy"/Mystery Sceience Theater 3000 kind of way, and it's so painfully awful that the only way I can get through it is to re-read some of my favorite bits from Good Omens (Gaiman's collaboration with Terry Pratchett, possibly the best book ever written about the Apocalypse; certainly the funniest) from time to time as an antidote.

So I treated myself to a nice hardcover Sandman collection last week, which I hadn't re-read since college. Damn, those are wonderful.

So you thought American Gods was merely good? I started that a while ago and didn't finish it; it wasn't holding me for some reason and I thought it might be just my mood at the time. I will try again; Neil always gets a second chance with me. What did you think of Stardust?
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Orsino Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu May-26-05 05:56 PM
Response to Reply #69
71. I honestly haven't read it yet.
It's been on the shelf for years, since the week it came out in hardback. I've flipped though it for the gorgeous Charles Vess art, but have never actually read the story.
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WildClarySage Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jun-04-05 09:44 PM
Response to Reply #71
72. What a coincidence- I just finished Stardust this evening.
Loved it, as much as Neverwhere, the only other book of his I've read so far. Any recommendations on what to read of his next?
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat May-16-09 03:28 PM
Response to Reply #69
124. I'm so glad you mentioned "Good Omens."
I finished it today. I've read "American Gods," "Stardust," and "Coraline." I'd never read "Good Omens."

I was wondering if Gaiman had ever appeared on this thread. I'm glad to see he's here, and I heartily recommend "Good Omens" for all.
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Geek_Girl Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jun-14-05 11:00 PM
Response to Original message
73. Marion Zimmerman Bradley
Mist of Avalon is one of my favorites and I've read many others as well. She has a wonderful feminine perspective on the King Arthur Legend.
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semillama Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jul-12-05 10:56 AM
Response to Original message
74. Tad Williams
His new one is really interesting, but I find it a little similar to Martin's A Game of Thrones books. The characters are great, though, and the settings and locations feel so real. I tore through it.

First thing I read by him was the Memory, Sorrow and Thorn series, which for me was very different in tone than the other fantasy I had read (Tolkien, McCaffery, Lloyd Alexander, C. S. Lewis, etc - I was in my teens at the time). I need to go back and re-read it, it's been a while. I remember that it was so sad in parts, and it was more effective than LOTR to me in establishing that there was a greater glory, and humans were living in its shadows.

For fantasy in a modern vein, The Otherland series was awesome.

The one shot War of the Flowers wasn't as good, but it was still fun to read and had great characters.

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MrSlayer Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jul-17-05 04:57 PM
Response to Original message
76. Weis & Hickman, Douglas Niles, Richard A. Knaak
All Dragonlance authors, Forgotten Realms authors and of course the obligatory Tolkien and Rowling.
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Lisa Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jul-17-05 08:17 PM
Response to Original message
77. Carol Kendall
She's probably best known for "The Gammage Cup". But she wrote a couple of other books set in the same fantasy world -- "The Whisper of Glocken" and "The Firelings" -- which end up being very different.

She's in her 80s now, living in Lawrence, Kansas. We've corresponded on several occasions -- she's a lifelong Dem and very progressive.

Someone tried to start a rumour that she was attempting to sue over the use of the word "Muggles" in the Harry Potter books. She completely debunked this, saying that there was just no way she'd sue anybody over a word.
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blueraven95 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Aug-20-05 01:19 AM
Response to Original message
79. just a few
Terry Prachett (can't believe he hasn't been mentioned yet - unless I missed it)
Diana Wynne Jones - if you like Harry Potter, try her.
Tad Williams - I love the Otherland series
Robin McKinley - for a long time she was classified soley as young adult, but with her latest book, Sunshine, her earlier stuff is also being put in adult fantasy.

Also, I just reread Neil Gaimen's American Gods, and I have to say, I liked it better the second time around.
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Aug-20-05 06:11 PM
Response to Reply #79
80. I've read a couple of those:
I read McKinley many years ago; I honestly don't remember anything but her name. :blush:

I've got a copy of American Gods; great book!
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blueraven95 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Aug-20-05 06:45 PM
Response to Reply #80
81. I highly reccommend McKinley's Sunshine
its a departure from her earlier work, which was more fairy tale based.
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-21-05 09:14 AM
Response to Reply #81
82. I'll add it to my list!
I've always got a stack I'm working on.
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AbbyR Donating Member (734 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-19-05 03:38 PM
Response to Original message
84. A few of mine
I am a kids' book junkie - so:
A Wrinkle in Time, Madeline L'Engle
The Dark Is Rising series, Susan Cooper
Harry Potter, JK Rowling
Wise Child, Juniper and Colman, Monica Furlong
And, for older folks, the Alvin Maker books by Orson Scott Card.

I also loved Zenna Henderson's People

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davidinalameda Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-19-05 04:03 PM
Response to Reply #84
85. thanks AbbyR
and welcome to DU and especially the Fantasy Lit Forum

:hi:
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AbbyR Donating Member (734 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-19-05 04:22 PM
Response to Reply #85
86. And thanks for the welcome...
I've been reading here for a while, but don't think I've posted yet. And I forgot The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, C.S. Lewis. Loved that one, too.
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Oct-21-05 05:43 PM
Response to Reply #84
88. Kids' books!
As an ex-school librarian and a middle school teacher, I still love them. I'd add Cornelia Funke; her "Thief Lord was pretty good. Her "dragon rider" was...ahem...a bit disappointing. But I forgive her, because she gave us INKHEART!
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Kellanved Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-24-05 02:44 PM
Response to Original message
89. Steven Erikson
My nickname is a dead giveaway ;D

The Malazan book of the fallen is an epic high fantasy series, which uses more shades of gray than most others in the genre.

Pick up "Gardens of the Moon": while it takes a long time for the story to get underway, it is some of the best fanatsy around. Erikson introduces a myriad places, deities and people, which makes it somewhat hard to follow at first, but it is very rewarding.


BTW: I second the Brust nomination.
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lazarus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-02-05 02:44 PM
Response to Reply #89
92. Hooray!
Another Brustian joins the fold.

He's just finishing/finished "Dzur", the new Vlad novel. Hoping to see it in stores early next year.
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Beetwasher Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-10-05 10:31 AM
Response to Reply #92
93. BTW, Speaking of Brust
On your recommendation I started reading him and I'm hooked! :thumbsup: I tore through all the Vlad Taltos books already and can't wait for Dzur.

I just finished the Khaavren romances and just started the Viscount of Adrilankha series.
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lazarus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-13-05 03:31 AM
Response to Reply #93
94. Fantastic
I'm happy we have another Brust fan out there.

The Khaavren romances are a hoot, aren't they? You can tell Steve was having a blast writing them.

BTW, Steve taught me how to play poker and drink single malt scotch a few years ago at a SF con. He's beyond cool, if you ever get a chance to go to a con he's at.

He's in LA this month, but I'm out of town that weekend, of course, so can't drive up to see him.
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Beetwasher Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Nov-14-05 09:20 AM
Response to Reply #94
95. Cha!
Good stuff!

That's cool that you met him!
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Matilda Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-15-05 02:10 AM
Response to Original message
96. I add my vote for Susan Cooper.
I originally bought The Dark Is Rising series to read to my daugher, but I became hooked myself.
Even my son, not a reader, enjoyed them.

I do also love the Harry Potter books, but I think Cooper's writing probably has a bit more depth.
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XemaSab Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-16-05 01:40 AM
Response to Reply #96
97. I reread the book "the Dark is Rising"
last week, which was one of my favorites as a wee lass, and I thought it was very well grounded in pre-Christian English mythology, but it seemed to skip around a bit.

Which of the other books in the series did you particularly enjoy?
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Matilda Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-16-05 02:12 AM
Response to Reply #97
98. I think The Dark Is Rising is the best stand-alone book of the series,
but the others seemed to get better as the series went on, so The Grey King and Silver on the Tree
were my other favorites. But although the first two are not quite as gripping, it's necessary to
read them to get the background. That might be why you felt The Dark Is Rising skipped around a
bit; they all do, but when you work through them it all seems to fall into place.

I really don't understand why they're not better known. I generally get blank looks when I mention
them to people.

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XemaSab Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-16-05 12:53 PM
Response to Reply #98
99. I dug out "Greenwitch" and "the Gray King",
(Silver on the Tree seems to be MIA), and I reread Greenwitch and it was pretty good.

I think I just had a short attention span when I was little. :P
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Dec-17-05 01:45 PM
Response to Reply #96
100. I enjoy that series.
I think you are correct about the depth; I don't recommend this one to my students as often as others; only recommended to those who can go a little "deeper."
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Reader Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Apr-25-06 06:51 AM
Response to Original message
102. Sharon Shinn
The Samaria series is fascinating, although I prefer most of her standalone books.
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MaraJade Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jun-05-06 09:07 PM
Response to Original message
103. I grew up on science fiction and fantasy. . .
and came to love the classic writers. For me, it began with Madeline L'Engle's "Wrinkle in Time" Trilogy. Went on to
Bradbury, Clark, Heinlein, Asimov.

I have to declare that the writers that impressed me most were the ones who were able to create whole worlds from simply
nothing at all. Naming just one is simply impossible.

Here's my list:

J. R. R. Tolkien

Frank Herbert

Isaac Asimov

C J Cherryh

Octavia Butler



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MountainLaurel Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Nov-10-06 08:36 AM
Response to Original message
105. Anything good about to come out?
I'm now responsible for purchasing adult fiction for a small public library, and the scifi/fantasy area has been somewhat neglected (well, everything has, but in mystery and fiction they've been able to go on purchase requests and just getting whatever is new from the popular authors). I have about $2000 to spend in the next two weeks for the end of the fiscal year. Can this panel of experts give me some ideas?

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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Nov-13-06 07:55 AM
Response to Reply #105
106. There are some great starts
right here in this thread. I've found some new stuff that I like, revisited old favorites, and passed some suggestions off to my (adult) son that seemed more suited to his taste.

I can say that I think any fantasy collection cannot be complete without the following:

Lackey
DeLint
McKillip
LeGuin
MacAvoy
McCaffrey

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TheBaldyMan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Nov-13-06 08:38 AM
Response to Reply #105
107. definately Terry Pratchett
although you must have some of his novels already.

If you don't 'The Colour of Magic' and 'Mort' are pretty good starters.
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semillama Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-14-06 02:52 PM
Response to Reply #105
108. Are you only looking at new hardcover?
I know the new Robin Hobb just came out...

Jordan's latest is coming out in paperback soon, as well.
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ms liberty Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Feb-21-07 09:03 AM
Response to Original message
110. I can't believe no one's mentioned these two...
David Eddings and Raymond Feist. Two great authors.
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MalachiConstant Donating Member (368 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Feb-21-07 05:14 PM
Response to Reply #110
111. i really liked eddings as a kid
(being a kid was only 10 years ago for me) but i haven't read anything by him since he put out the polgara and belgarath books. but the belgariad is a classic.
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semillama Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jan-30-08 10:28 AM
Response to Reply #111
113. Yeah, I really loved those stories as a young adult myself.
I haven't picked up his new series yet.

I'm surprised that no one's optioned the Belgariad series for the big screen yet. I think it could be a very well done transition with not a lot of removal of plot, key events or characters.
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-31-08 08:08 AM
Response to Reply #113
114. I read several of Eddings' a lifetime ago.
I don't remember getting rid of the books, but I've moved several times and weed the collection hard when I do. I remember liking what I read; the Thomas Covenant series, I believe. I just don't have it any more, so haven't reread it since.
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JPettus Donating Member (356 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-01-08 02:05 AM
Response to Original message
115. Jim Butcher and Kim Harrison
The former writes the kickass Dresden Files about the only wizard in Chicago's Yellow Pages, and Harrison writes of The Hollows in Cincinnati and a runner (bounty hunter) named Rachel Morgan. Both write excellent "dark urban fantasy" genre tales.
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-14-09 05:57 PM
Response to Reply #115
131. I like both of those,
Dresden more than the Hollows stories.

Rachel is a little too gothic for me, in the way of heroines who should know better, but repeatedly do stupid stuff to keep the story flowing. That, and her ADHD tendencies get on my nerves, but I still read one now and again.

I LOVE the Dresden files, and Butcher's venture into other fantasy with his "furies" series is good, as well.

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KatyMan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Mar-14-08 08:47 AM
Response to Original message
117. A couple come to mind
Katherine Kurtz (although a bit repetetive)
Patricia Mckillip, mainly thinking of the Riddlemaster series, awesome)
Dragonriders
Glen Cook, Black Company


I second Robin Hobb.

And what about ol' JRRT? :D
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Mar-16-08 01:21 PM
Response to Reply #117
118. JRRT was my first introduction to fantasy, as a kid.
I still have my original LOTR trilogy, a cloth-bound edition purchased by my mother around 1970. It's sadly tattered, but still loved. That original "Hobbit" is long gone, read into pieces, but I've got a newer edition to take it's place.

I realize that JRRT colored my view of fantasy lit forever. I rejected many series because they were plainly middle-earth "wanna-bes." The original middle earth, while flawed in many ways, set a standard for me, and I didn't, and don't, want any derivatives.

McKillip...I love her stuff. The riddle-master series in particular, but all of her works are so rich; ballads in prose.

McCaffrey's Dragonriders fill another section of my shelves, and I still reread them, beginning to end, every couple of years. I loved the characters, and the best of humanity shown: the drive to create, to evolve, to change.

Kurtz sounds familiar; I don't remember if I read anything she wrote, but her name at least sparks recognition. I don't know Cook. I'll add him to my list of people to check out. Hobb? I read Assassin's Apprentice, and stopped there. It didn't really resonate with me. I passed it to my (adult) son, where it found an appreciative audience.
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Sabriel Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Mar-16-08 10:37 PM
Response to Original message
119. The Bartimaeus Trilogy
I just read it for the second time, and now my son is listening to the CD (read by Simon Jones), which I highly recommend. It's one of those trilogies that actually improves as it goes on, rather like the Attolia trilogy.
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BelgianMadCow Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun May-03-09 05:53 PM
Response to Original message
121. Frank Herbert - Dune series
or isn't that fantasy? It's SciFi if you will but I find it very imaginative & situated in a well thought out fantasu world.. :shrug:

Thanks for the thread!
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat May-09-09 02:16 PM
Response to Reply #121
123. You're welcome, lol.
It amazes me that this thread, started a few weeks after the Fantasy Lit group appeared 5 years ago, has been on the front page ever since.

Still, I check back in frequently myself; I'm always looking for new authors, as I tend to devour everything by those I really love, and then thirst dreadfully while I wait for more to be printed.

I first read "Dune" when I was about 12. I read it and reread it for the next couple of decades. I never did develop a liking for the rest of the series. I liked Paul. I didn't like the direction his character, and the story, took after defeating the Harkonnens. I guess, in my youth, I wanted him to have a happy ending; I didn't want everything to be about politics, power, and empire building.

Still, it's a good series to add to the collection!
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Broken_Hero Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jun-27-09 04:42 AM
Response to Original message
125. Annals of the Black Company by Glen Cook
Also his Fortress in Shadow set...very, very good. The Black Company was great from start to finish. Most series usually have a mundane ending, but the ending to this series fit the characters involved to the TEE.
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jun-27-09 07:25 PM
Response to Reply #125
126. Tell me more;
I'm looking for some new summer reads!
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Mist Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-30-09 09:36 PM
Response to Reply #126
128. Have you read Alice Borchardt? She's the much-less-known sister of
Anne Rice. Borchardt writes historical/fantasy novels. I particularly liked "Devoted" and it's sequel "Beguiled." Set in 9th C. France during the Viking invasions. Her heroine, Elin, is a member of a tribe called "the forest people," who are pagan/sorcerer types. Her books blend good historical research with some fantasy/sorcery. Her other books involve a tribe of were-people living in the mountains of France. I didn't like the subject as well as the clash of Viking/Franco culture, but may give them another try.
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-02-09 08:23 PM
Response to Reply #128
129. Thanks for the suggestion; I've put one of her books on hold
at the library.

:hi:
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Ozymanithrax Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jul-19-09 01:01 PM
Response to Original message
127. Rober E. Howard, H. P. Lovecraft, Lord Dunsany, Evangeline Walton
Edited on Sun Jul-19-09 01:05 PM by Ozymanithrax
Howard - Conan, Bran Mak Morn,
Lovecraft - Dreamquest of Unknown Kadath (Many of his early stories in his Dunsinan Period)
Dunsany - The King of Elfland's Daughter.
Evangeline Walton - The Song of Rhiannon: The Third Branch of the Mabinogion, Prince of Annwn, The Island of the Mighty
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KatyMan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-12-09 12:52 PM
Response to Original message
130. Kind of old school,
But Katherine Kurtz (the Deryni series, and the first 3 Camber books) was always a favorite of mine, as well as Patricia McKillip. Feist was good when he came out, haven't read him in a while.

Can't beat Tolkien, though!
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jul-04-10 08:43 PM
Response to Reply #130
134. McKillip is a big favorite of mine.
Tolkien? I grew up on him. While I've grown, he's as present, familiar, and loved as my first family dog.

Kurtz...I read them, and I remember liking them, but it's been so long, I can't remember what they are about!

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azul Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-23-10 12:18 AM
Response to Original message
136. Dear Mr Fantasy,
My favorites seem to be older stuff, but thanks for this thread for some new-to-me writers I shall try.


William Morris, esp. Well at the World's End.

James Stephens, try Crock of Gold and Deirdre.

James Branch Cabell, try Jurgen and Domnei, what amazing variety in his great series.

E R Eddison, Zimiamvia.

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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jul-05-11 10:27 AM
Response to Reply #136
137. I have never read any of these.
New fodder for summer, thanks!

I love that I'm still getting new authors and stories, almost 7 years later. :hi:
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Sep-14-11 08:14 AM
Response to Original message
138. Patrick Rothfuss.
"Name of the Wind," and "The Wise Man's Fear."
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Sabriel Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Oct-01-11 09:46 PM
Response to Original message
139. Try Rick Yancey's "The Monstromologist"
And the two sequels.


Shudder. I read a lot of graphic writing, and I actually had to put the book down several times.

Beautiful and yet horrible writing.
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-16-11 07:34 PM
Response to Original message
140. Kevin Hearne: Hounded
The last Druid, after a few thousand years, living in the 21st century and dealing with the fae, the vampires, the werewolves, the witches, and some long-term enemies that want to see him go down.
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catchnrelease Donating Member (359 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-20-11 12:59 AM
Response to Original message
141. Bad news/good news
Bad news--my laptop died a couple of months ago and since then have had to share computer time on the desktop with my husband . Good news--I've been flying through all the books that I've had sitting for ages, waiting to be read. Needing more, I found this thread and lots of new names/titles, so thanks L Wolf and all the others for suggestions!

No one has mentioned Jane Lindskold. Love her work, she comes up with some really original ideas. The 2 Athanor books-Changer and Legends Walking are really fun. I am hoping she will add to that series. Also, her Breaking the Wall trilogy--Thirteen Orphans, Nine Gates and Five Odd Honors are very good.

Sherri Tepper--sometimes her themes are repetitive, but I still enjoy her writing, and the detailed worlds she creates.

DeLint absolutely, Gaiman too.

More please... :hi:
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Dec-06-11 03:25 PM
Response to Reply #141
142. Lindskold: is she the one who writes about the wolf girl? nt
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catchnrelease Donating Member (359 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-07-11 04:30 PM
Response to Reply #142
144. Yes
I have not read any of her wolf series, but a friend who has similar taste in reading to mine, likes them, and said I should try them. I am reluctant to get into a long series like that, as it's sometimes hard/frustrating trying to find the book that comes next in line.

At the moment I'm on the last of the fantasy books in my stack (Sherri Tepper's Raising the Stones) and I'm already having panic attacks about what to look for next, lol!
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-07-11 07:21 PM
Response to Reply #144
145. I've read a few of the wolf books.
I liked them, but ended up not being excited about the direction the series was going, so I stopped. I didn't NOT like them, they just haven't been priorities.

There are certainly plenty of suggestions in this thread, while it lasts, to comb through. :)
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catchnrelease Donating Member (359 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-08-11 01:54 AM
Response to Reply #145
146. I did make a wish list
I did go through this thread and put several authors on my Amazon wish list. The Druid books you mention and the Monstromologist are among the ones I am interested in. Too bad there's not some way this thread could be archived, so much good info here as a reference.

Thanks again!
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Dec-06-11 03:28 PM
Response to Original message
143. On the subject of bad and good news...
Bad news? This thread, which represents a 7 year collection of great fantasy authors, that I still refer to every time I've run through my current favorites and are looking for fresh stuff...is going away with the onset of DU3.

Is there a way to save this, or to transfer it to DU3?

Good news? Lazarus has already started a new authors thread in the new fantasy group there. Check it out.
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