Democratic Underground Latest Greatest Lobby Journals Search Options Help Login
Google

Autism Linked to College-Educated Parents

Printer-friendly format Printer-friendly format
Printer-friendly format Email this thread to a friend
Printer-friendly format Bookmark this thread
Home » Discuss » Topic Forums » Disability Donate to DU
 
Modern School Donating Member (558 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Apr-09-11 04:38 PM
Original message
Autism Linked to College-Educated Parents
A recent posting by Josh Clark (Discovery News), NEWS: Autism Clusters Tied to College-Educated Parents, describes a recent epidemiological study by the University of California, Davis, that found clusters of autism in regions of Southern California with high concentrations of highly educated parents.

The study by Dr. Karla Van Meter, published in the journal Autism Research, examined the birth records for 2.4 million California births between 1996 and 2000, 10,000 of whom were later diagnosed with autism. Van Meter and colleagues found a difference in the rate of autism in areas of highly educated parents to be almost double that of nearby areas with lower levels of parental education. They also found that the prevalence of autism increased with the amount of education.

There is still considerable debate about the causes of autism. While, there is no logical mechanism for the education of parents to directly cause the disorder, other studies have shown a correlation between the age of parents and the incidence of autism. Highly educated parents tend to delay child rearing, partially in order to finish school and partly to give themselves time to establish themselves in the competitive and demanding careers for which they are training. Therefore, one possible explanation for Van Meters observations is that high degrees of education correlate with delayed child rearing and that it is actually the advanced age of the parents that is the causative factor.

Ironically, college-educated middle class California families are among those most likely to skip vaccinations out of the irrational (and refuted) fear that vaccines cause autism.

Modern School
http://modeducation.blogspot.com/
Refresh | +2 Recommendations Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
Duer 157099 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Apr-09-11 04:42 PM
Response to Original message
1. Really? So they did this "study" without age-matched controls?
Shitty design imho.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
sakabatou Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Apr-09-11 04:42 PM
Response to Original message
2. This study doesn't sound very.... sound.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
WatsonT Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Apr-09-11 04:43 PM
Response to Original message
3. Or more likely
College educated parents are more likely to have the money and the desire to take their kid in for such testing.

You don't see problems where you don't look for them.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
kickysnana Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Apr-09-11 04:58 PM
Response to Reply #3
6. My sister was befriended by a 50 y o fellow in her apartment building..
After carpooling for a few shopping trips it was obvious he had OCD and declining health was pushing him into hoarding. She asked him if he had ever had a diagnosis and he said no, He was raised in AL. She told him life would be a lot easier if he could understand why he did things and perhaps find alternatives that were not so isolating. So he did go get some counseling.

He stopped the hoarding and now has a lot of friends where neighbors shunned him before he got some help.

First thing I thought before I looked at the actual study was that college educated parents would see this as something that could be looked into and improved where average parents would look at is as simply bad behavior to be tolerated or ignored.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Iris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Apr-09-11 05:02 PM
Response to Reply #6
7. That's a great story. Thanks for sharing. What a wonderful person your sister is to take the time
to help her neighbor!

And a good example of what the study might be missing. From what I understand, the increase in the diagnosis of autism is partially due to how autism is defined. Some behaviors that might have once been considered a personality quirk are actually a form of autism.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
angstlessk Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Apr-09-11 04:45 PM
Response to Original message
4. so, teen pregnancy is a GOOD thing? n/t
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
HysteryDiagnosis Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Apr-09-11 04:54 PM
Response to Original message
5. In other news, autism is linked to breathing. n/t
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
TygrBright Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Apr-09-11 05:05 PM
Response to Original message
8. Extremely poor science.
You can find dozens of correlative factors, but autism is too complex a disorder for a study like this to even remotely start speculating on causation. Birth records give very little real information, and there is no actual way of following a highly mobile population based on static records of who was where at the time of their birth.

Poor Dr. Van Meter. I very much doubt she intended her work to be used this way.

disgustedly,
Bright
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
HysteryDiagnosis Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Apr-09-11 05:08 PM
Response to Reply #8
9. It is a murky business trying to find "a" cause for autism or other neurological
conditions.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19307110
Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2009 Apr;80(4):221-7.
Plasma fatty acid profiles in autism: a case-control study.

Wiest MM, German JB, Harvey DJ, Watkins SM, Hertz-Picciotto I.

Division of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA. mwiest@uidaho.edu
Abstract

Increasing evidence is mounting in support of fatty acid metabolism playing a role in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism. In order to definitely determine whether fatty acid concentrations were associated with autism, we quantitatively measured 30 fatty acids from seven lipid classes in plasma from a large subset of subjects enrolled in the Childhood Autism Risk from Genetics and the Environment (CHARGE) study. The CHARGE study is a large, population-based case-control study on children aged 2-5 born in California. Our subset consisted of 153 children with autism and 97 developmentally normal controls. Results showed that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) was significantly decreased in phosphatidylethanolamine. Dimethyl acetals were significantly decreased in phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine as well. These results are consistent with the only other study to measure dimethyl acetals in children with autism, and suggest that the function of peroxisomes and the enzymes of the peroxisome involved with fatty acid metabolism may be affected in autism.

PMID: 19307110
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Zoeisright Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Apr-09-11 05:20 PM
Response to Original message
10. I have heard this, and I think it's right.
I know this is anecdotal, but it seems that the higher the parent's IQ, the more chance of an autistic child. There are several extremely intelligent families in my small college town with autistic kids. I think it's the brain chemistry of highly intelligent people, though, and not because of age.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Demeter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Apr-09-11 05:22 PM
Response to Original message
11. How Blind Can One Be?
Edited on Sat Apr-09-11 05:33 PM by Demeter
When one's genes have programmed one to excel in hard sciences, law, etc...and women can finally go to schools that teach to their strengths, and they marry their classmates and reinforce those particular genetic traits in the next generation...

Whamo. Too many "intelligence" genes. Too many copies of the DNA that creates genius, and you've gone a gene too far.

It's takes an ability to deal with genetic reality to admit this was a breeding error, instead of looking to pin it on "vaccines" or other shit science.

In previous generations, women like me would have been spinster teachers, unlikely to marry anyone at all, let alone someone at our level of ability.

Just my luck to meet a fellow carrier...and produce one very highly intelligent normal child, and one severely handicapped, high functioning autistic one. And then, Daddy decides he can't handle it...

The shadow of autism shaded several generations in both families, but it wasn't reinforced...our first child got every bad gene in the pool. The second only got the bad eyesight and allergies, a combination that pairs with high IQ, by the way...

Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
laconicsax Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Apr-09-11 05:41 PM
Response to Reply #11
12. Excelling in science, law, etc. isn't a genetic function.
There's no "scientist," "lawyer," or "intelligence" gene and success in either of those professions doesn't indicate intelligence, but education and class.

Your post implies eugenics.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Name removed Donating Member (0 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Apr-09-11 05:48 PM
Response to Reply #12
13. Deleted message
Message removed by moderator. Click here to review the message board rules.
 
laconicsax Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Apr-09-11 06:23 PM
Response to Reply #13
14. Nice comeback!
:eyes:
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
kestrel91316 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Apr-09-11 06:50 PM
Response to Original message
15. Is Jenny what's-her-name now going to campaign to shut down all
colleges and universities?
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Sadena Meti Donating Member (332 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-28-11 09:41 AM
Response to Original message
16. Reporting Distortions
College educated parents are more likely to notice problems in their children and thus seek treatment (and have the funds to seek treatment).

Kind of like the disparity in mental health statistics between whites and black. Whites are more likely to seek help, while blacks (culturally) are more likely to suffer in silence. But if you look at the statistics without this reporting distortion in mind, you'd conclude that whites are crazier than blacks.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
DU AdBot (1000+ posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view 
this author's profile Click to add 
this author to your buddy list Click to add 
this author to your Ignore list Sat Dec 20th 2014, 05:41 AM
Response to Original message
Advertisements [?]
 Top

Home » Discuss » Topic Forums » Disability Donate to DU

Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.1 Copyright 1997-2002 DCScripts.com
Software has been extensively modified by the DU administrators


Important Notices: By participating on this discussion board, visitors agree to abide by the rules outlined on our Rules page. Messages posted on the Democratic Underground Discussion Forums are the opinions of the individuals who post them, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Democratic Underground, LLC.

Home  |  Discussion Forums  |  Journals |  Store  |  Donate

About DU  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

Got a message for Democratic Underground? Click here to send us a message.

© 2001 - 2011 Democratic Underground, LLC