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elleng Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-11-11 12:58 PM
Original message
Question, rose bush
I don't have a garden, but house next door, foreclosed and uninhabited, has a rose-bush in front. The roses are the most wonderful 'salmon' color. I've kind of adopted the bush, that is, I water it, clip and bring roses into my apartment, and I 'pruned' the bush a few weeks ago, as it was looking quite straggly. Its rather tall, about 5 feet, but not a climber, I think. Wondering about the proper/best way to 'harvest,' clip the flowers, to preserve the plant's healthy life and encourage future blooms.

Thanks
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Curmudgeoness Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-11-11 04:58 PM
Response to Original message
1. They say that you are supposed to cut roses just above
the first stem with five leaves on it. I find that if this leaves me with too short of a stem, I will go down to another five leaf stem.

Then, in the early spring, you cut the bush down hard. I have been told that you cut all of it back to about a foot tall, but I never have had the nerve to go that far, and with a five foot bush, I know I couldn't do it that far. But just so that you don't worry too much about what you do, I got tired of a rose bush I had since it attracted Japanese Beetles. I dug the danged thing out, but obviously did not get all the root because it is back. So....it isn't that easy to kill an established rose bush.

Good luck.
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elleng Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-11-11 05:02 PM
Response to Reply #1
2. THANKS!
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InkAddict Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-11-11 07:14 PM
Response to Reply #1
3. Rose care
Remove spent roses just above a five-leaf stem as suggested; clipping the stem at an angle, neither too close nor too far from the junction, will support the new growth. Put a dab of Elmer's glue on larger canes that you clip so borer insects cannot chew into freshly cut canes. Fertilize at mid season, but do not fertilize after mid season as this will promote growth that will not make it through winter. In late autumn do not collect flowers for vase as this will force growth which will be killed at frost; you may elect to allow flowers to form hips. Prune no more than one-third the heighth of a stem at a time. On dormancy, canes can be cut lower if you wish, leaving stem buds above the crown to a height of up to about 2 ft. Winterize by heaping dirt or clean mulch about crown; leaves are not suggested as they promote rotting and molds. Nurseries also sell covers of up to about 24 inches in height that will protect the canes from drying winds and deepest cold which may not be a problem in your area. Carefully remove these covers and the additional dirt early spring as the weather warms above frost and give a helping of fertilizer to promote new growth and first flush of blooms.

http://www.allaboutrosegardening.com/Winterizing-Roses....

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elleng Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-11-11 08:42 PM
Response to Reply #3
4. Thanks
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trud Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-11-11 09:48 PM
Response to Reply #1
5. I don't cut my roses down hard
Edited on Thu Aug-11-11 09:49 PM by trud
I'm in zone 6. (Down to -10 in the winter.) i just prune off dead wood, using the five leaf stuff described (as opposed to cutting down to three leaf things), or canes that cross at awkward angles.

If you had a yard, I'd suggest rustling the rose. I'm sure the bank doesn't give a darn about it and bulldozing may be in its future, which would be a real shame.

Some roses are very sturdy, and some are delicate souls.
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elleng Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-11-11 10:01 PM
Response to Reply #5
6. Thanks. Thought of taking a 'cutting' for friend's yard.
Won't be bulldozed, imo; OLD house, OLD neighborhood, agent knows of my interest in the rose, and I think appreciates its value!
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eShirl Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-12-11 05:42 AM
Response to Reply #5
7. THAT's what I need to do - somehow rustle a family heirloom rosebush to save it
Edited on Fri Aug-12-11 05:43 AM by eShirl
It's on a corner of the house that will likely be disturbed when a new addition is built soon. It's been with the family (and moved with it, last in the 1950s) at least since my great grandparents' time, i.e. a century or more.

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trud Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-12-11 06:12 AM
Response to Reply #7
8. Shirl
Why not just ask the current owners? If it will be clobbered by the addition, they may not mind you digging it up. Also, if it's not grafted, you could take cuttings.
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eShirl Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-12-11 10:12 AM
Response to Reply #8
9. oh, my family is the current owners (elderly parents)
I've never moved, or taken cuttings of, a rose bush before, but I know it can be done as... long as I don't screw it up. :) I've got a few weeks... I might try both transplanting and cuttings, just to increase my odds of success. I'm pretty sure it's not grafted.

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WhiteTara Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-12-11 08:32 PM
Response to Original message
10. You know you can take cuttings and grow your own bush
as well? It's really pretty simple. Any gardening book will tell you how to make rose cuttings. Always clip at the joint at the true 5 leaves.
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elleng Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-12-11 09:05 PM
Response to Reply #10
11. Thanks, thinking of bring some to friend's house,
where I spend 50% of my time!
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WhiteTara Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Aug-13-11 02:11 PM
Response to Reply #11
12. This is the time of year to take cuttings. n/t
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eShirl Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-14-11 05:39 AM
Response to Reply #12
13. excellent; thanks, did not know that. n/t
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