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Saw something new to me today at the nursery...grafted tomatoes.

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Zoigal Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-07-11 08:53 PM
Original message
Saw something new to me today at the nursery...grafted tomatoes.
Tag didn't indicate what varieties were used in
grafting, but said they were highly disease resistant,
produced well, etc. The plants looked rather scraggly
and were a bit to expensive for me to buy at this time
in the season....z
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NRaleighLiberal Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Aug-08-11 03:17 PM
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1. What they do is to graft good tasting "tops" onto disease tolerant root stock.
So any diseases that some in through the roots - Fusarium Wilt, Bacterial Wilt, etc - this would help. However, if an infected insect chews on the foliage, or if diseased soil splashes up onto the top part foliage, being on disease tolerant rootstock won't help at all.

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Denninmi Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Aug-08-11 03:20 PM
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2. I've actually heard pretty good comments about this on tomato forums.
What the nursery people won't tell you is how easy it is to do at home, if you are so inclined. You just need to start the rootstock and the top at the same time, in cell packs or small pots. Then, when about 4-5 inches tall, you do what is known as a "side graft" -- slice about a third of the way into the lower stems of each at the same height, removing a small area of tissue about the size of a pencil eraser. Then, align the cuts, wrap the whole thing with rubber grafting bands or even some parafilm, and set it aside about a week. The two will knit together. In a week, you sever the top of the rootstock and the roots of the top graft, and viola.

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Zoigal Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Aug-13-11 12:14 AM
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3. Thanks for the info, you two. Sounds like something i will
try next season. On our small farm in Oregon we
had quite a few grafted fruit trees. They were all
successful grafts and produced lovely fruit.......z
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