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Flaxbee Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-01-09 07:47 PM
Original message
Anyone with Maine Coon cats? My two part-MC cats seem to
Edited on Thu Jan-01-09 07:48 PM by Flaxbee
develop skin problems when the temperature rises -- little scabs all over, though one of them gets pretty bad breakouts and needs a shot of cortisone usually once or twice a year. The scabs don't really seem to bother the girls unless they get bad in the middle of summer, by which time I've tried to head off the worst of the breakouts with a cortisone shot as recommended by the vet.

They're not purebred, they're just part (or so I assume; MommaKitty brought me her three girls 3 years ago; I kept the whole family but two of the girlcats look NOTHING like their momma or sister - they're BIG, long cats, with long fur - the corona MCs seem to have, big, plumed tails, etc.)

Just wondering if anyone else has had this issue, or has any suggestions (aside from moving to much colder climates).

Cross-posted in the Lounge.
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tencats Donating Member (226 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-01-09 10:39 PM
Response to Original message
1. I think it could be the old ECG thing or did your Vet rule that out?
"The most frequent form is eosinophilic plaque. This is a rash comprised of raised red to salmon-colored and flat-topped, moist bumps scattered on the skin surface." A few of my cats would have this under their necks going down their chest down through their tummy.
I see that someone already suggested food allergies but thats not the most common cause of eosinophilic granuloma complex in cats. They are nice to find though because they can be eliminated just by avoiding offending food ingredients. There is a new food Z/D, made by Hill's, that is good for doing food trials with to see if food allergies are the problem. The most common cause of eosinphilic granuloma complex in cats is flea bite hypersensitivity. It can also be just as likely caused by mosquito bites or be inhalant allergies (sensitivity to weed and tree pollens). These last two groups would fit your description of the onset of the problem with the warming of the weather. Also contact allergies (plastics, wool, etc.) should be taken into consideration. Cats that I have had that suffered from ECG have cleared up nicely after a run of antibiotics along with a daily oral steroid. Had some recurrence of the problem in some cats and that was nicely cleared again with a rerun and then tapering of the oral steroid. All of mine that had ECG earlier have now not had any more this problem as they have grown older (that is after their 4th year.) Myself or the Vet were never sure what really caused the problem but I did change out the carpeting, never again used plastic water or food bowels and I started running air purifiers 24/7.
My cats are only indoors and never had fleas.

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Flaxbee Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-10-09 11:15 PM
Response to Reply #1
5. We haven't discussed ECG ...
And Marilyn, who has/d the worst of the outbreaks, also reacts very rapidly and favorably to cortisone and antibiotics. I don't mind doing that once a year or so, but when she was in the first full throes of the outbreak, I was frantic to find a solution that didn't regularly involve steroids. Now that it seems seasonal, or at least predictable, I can greatly reduce the shots - last year she only needed one cortisone shot.

Anyway, poor Marilyn also had what the vets call colloquially 'kitty acne' - horrible blackheads, sort of, all around her lower jawline. The vet suggested removing plastic food and water bowls; I did, and the acne went away. Poof, like magic.

My girls are indoor only, but there are two indoor/outdoor kids and they occasionally introduce fleas no matter how vigilant I am with Advantage, but the outbreaks seemed to coincide more with hot weather than flea season.
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tencats Donating Member (226 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-16-09 05:36 PM
Response to Reply #5
10. I should have written that EGC not ECG.
Eosinophilic Granuloma Complex, or EGC.
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Lorien Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-02-09 12:22 AM
Response to Original message
2. Yes, my Oberon has that. The vet says that it's flea bite dermatitis
I live in Florida so it's always hot here. He doesn't seem to have many fleas, but the scabs are everywhere. I've been using Schreiner's herbal solution and it seems to help, but he hates it! I wish I could find a better way.

The giant hairy beast:

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Flaxbee Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-10-09 11:10 PM
Response to Reply #2
4. My girl Hedy looks very much like Oberon - though
probably half the size of a purebred MC. She and Marilyn (her sister) are the only ones who react (their other sister, Ingrid, who looks nothing like them at all, has no skin issues, nor does their mother). Vet also mentioned flea-bite dermatitis, but at the time neither of my girls seemed to have fleas (they had a smattering later, but with no noticeable increase in scabs).

Marilyn gets it the worst = scabs upon scabs that affect the way she feels; Hedy's never get that bad.

:shrug: I'll look for Schreiner's and see if it helps them. Thanks, Lorein.
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Kookaburra Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-08-09 03:11 PM
Response to Original message
3. I have a Maine Coon, and the groomer told me that they have
very oily skin -- at least most of them do, and should be brushed with a soft brush daily to distribute the oil. She also recommended bringing the kitty in every 6 - 8 weeks for a "wash and set" just to get a good cleaning and make sure there aren't any clogged pores or glands.

Maine Coons are the coolest cats -- this is my first one, and she is absolutely delightful.
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Flaxbee Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-10-09 11:16 PM
Response to Reply #3
6. my two part-MC girls do LOVE to be brushed;
I should do this more often, I guess. Hmm. Can't see either one sitting still for a bath - I've never bathed any of my cats, just brushed them.

These girls have very distinct personalities - I assume your MC does, too? Thanks for the input.
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Kookaburra Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-11-09 08:03 AM
Response to Reply #6
7. Sophia-Maria LOVES water.
Edited on Sun Jan-11-09 08:04 AM by SpankieJane
Yours may too. It's another thing that Maine Coons are known for. I had to take her to the groomer when I first got her because she was matted up and covered in fleas. That's when they told me about the oily skin and about brushing her with a soft bristle brush. Sometimes if the oils get too built up on their skin they get a sort of acne, that eventually turns into scabby soars -- especially in the summer months.

Oh yes, she's quite a character. She's so prissy and lady-like (even has this little breathy meow that sounds a little like Marilyn Monroe), but does not like to be held. She'll sit beside me but never on my lap. Guess that means I have a buddy, but not a baby. Fine by me.


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madinmaryland Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-16-09 03:44 PM
Response to Reply #6
9. My wife bathed our MaineCoon (not Sonia) once, and only once.
He needed constant brushing and spring/summer was worst for his fur clumping. You could literally pull the clumps out.
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madinmaryland Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-16-09 03:42 PM
Response to Original message
8. My wife's mainecoon never had that problem. He did have a tough time
with his fur clumping. He was also an indoor cat.
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stpalmer Donating Member (111 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-18-09 06:17 PM
Response to Original message
11. My mother had a maine coone cat
that lived to be 23 years old! Never anything wrong until about year 19, when she became senile. My mom kept her alive by giving her vitamin C and other supplements, but the cat was incontinent and kinda nuts those last four years. When she finally died, they had to replace all their carpet.
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