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Lincoln's grand-father was killed by Native Americans in 1786

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Kire Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Apr-11-05 02:45 AM
Original message
Lincoln's grand-father was killed by Native Americans in 1786
but yet he still freed the slaves

http://www.historyplace.com/lincoln /
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JDPriestly Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jul-04-05 12:22 PM
Response to Original message
1. What is the connection?
Between being killed by Native Americans and freeing slaves. The Native Americans weren't slaves. I don't understand why the fact that Lincoln's grandfather was killed by Native Americans would affect Lincoln's freeing the slaves?
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Kire Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jul-18-05 11:17 AM
Response to Reply #1
3. I wish I could delete this thread.
but I guess I'm going to have to live with this Lincoln fanaticism haunting me whenever I come back to this board

what's worse is I posted it in the Native American forum

I was feeling very giddy when I learned that tidbit of information.

trivia is all it is, but I read all kinds of meaning about how great it was that he was able to look beyond past hurts to do something pretty great

:freak:
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RoyGBiv Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jul-18-05 09:18 PM
Response to Reply #3
4. Fanaticism?

I'm even more unclear what that means.

Please don't take offense. If it's just trivia, fine, but there was an implied connection that at least I didn't understand, and I think it was reasonable to ask for clarification on that point.

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Kire Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jul-19-05 03:27 PM
Response to Reply #4
7. it was more than reasonable
i was being unreasonable when I posted it, hence the fanaticism (yippee! abe's so great he freed the slaves despite his family tragedy)
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RoyGBiv Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jul-19-05 07:10 PM
Response to Reply #7
8. Oh, okay ...

I was confusipated.

I'm actually kind of a fanatic myself, so I understand the drive perfectly. :-)

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Popol Vuh Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-02-06 02:44 PM
Response to Reply #1
9. "The Native Americans weren't slaves" ?
I know your post is about not seeing the connection of native Americans and Lincoln freeing African slaves. Of which I agree with you. However, I would to point out that Native Americans were slaved, and a slave-trade of them did exist. (1)




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RoyGBiv Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jul-04-05 03:19 PM
Response to Original message
2. Huh?
I have the same question. What's the connection?

On yet another tangent, I'd like to note that the veracity of stories involving Lincoln's ancestry is at best questionable. I refer specifically to the first comment in that time line, noting that Samuel Lincoln settled in Massachusetts, leaving the implication that this was Lincoln's first "American" ancestor. I know of two distinct family trees for Lincoln's ancestors, neither of which are any relation to the other in any verifiable way, meaning one (or both) is wrong or not fully researched. Samuel Lincoln is a part of one of these trees. Another Lincoln who settled in Virginia is part of the other.

Anyway, I don't exactly doubt the story about Lincoln's grandfather. IIRC, the source is Lincoln himself, who apparently heard it from his own father, but family stories have a way of losing credibility when passed through generations by word of mouth. His grandfather may have been killed by Indians, as Lincoln put it, while toiling to establish a farm, or he may have been killed while trying to kill them so that he could establish a farm. We don't really know.

Regardless, the whole thing is part of the partial mythology that developed around Lincoln's heritage as a working class boy who rose up from nothing to be the President and one of the most important people in American history. Lincoln himself helped foster some of this mythology during his rise in the law profession and politics. He did do what he said he did, of course, but the way he did it is not often well represented in popular history. We're left with images of reading by candle light late into the night, as though this were unusual in the wilderness of 19th century America, and walking miles in harsh weather just to borrow books, or more importantly, to return those books. We're not often even told the elements of this story that would create the images of a shrewd politician, a wealthy lawyer with vast professional connections, or a person who would sacrifice principles in a given situation if it gained him the advantage.

And, again, how this relates to slavery or the end of it I am clueless to say.

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libnnc Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jul-19-05 12:56 AM
Response to Original message
5. Thomas Lincoln may not have been Abe's bio-father...
http://www.genealogytoday.com/us/lincoln/wesley.html

http://www.genealogytoday.com/us/lincoln/genesis.pdf

http://www.carolinacountry.com/StoryPages/ourstories/ab...

Pictures don't lie. Carefully examine the photo of Wesley Enloe and that of the President. There is a resemblence, no?
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RoyGBiv Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jul-19-05 01:25 AM
Response to Reply #5
6. Pictures may not lie ...

But grainy 19th century photographs are certainly hard to interpret, especially for the details that to allow one to determine ancestry.

I could show you some photos from the 1860's of bona fide black men in a Confederate uniform. Problem is, they aren't black, but you couldn't tell that from the picture.
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