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elleng Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-24-11 08:41 AM
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Thanksgiving Thrift:
The Holiday as a Model for Sustainable Cooking

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/22/opinion/thanksgiving-...
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Denninmi Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-24-11 10:05 AM
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1. Nice article.
Edited on Thu Nov-24-11 10:07 AM by Denninmi
Not really anything new to me, since I pretty much already live this way.

As I was doing Thanksgiving prep, I generated about half of a garbage bag of assorted residue -- potato and apple peelings, squash skin and seeds, celery leaf, etc -- anything I didn't want which is still edible. This all goes to my poultry, who repurpose it into eggs and meat.

After we're done eating, I will pull all of the meat off of the turkey carcass and bag that up, and then put the bones into a stock pot and boil them for stock. The bones, after they're picked through again, will be very clean. These I'll put onto a cookie tray and dry out in the oven over the next days. When completely dry, I'll powder them up in the food processor into bone meal, which I will also feed back to the birds to augment their diet.


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csziggy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-27-11 02:07 AM
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4. Many of my vegetable trimmings go into the pot with the turkey carcass
To make stock - especially celery, onion and carrots. The onion skin and ends, and carrot ends, as well as the celery leaves add a lot of additional flavor to the stock. Since I'll be straining it anyway, why not use those trimmings?

I do that any time I make a big meat dish where I will have bones and trimmings worth stewing into stock. Last time I bought a cheap chuck roast I cut out the bones and fat, then put those with the trimmings from the stew vegetables into a pot and made some lovely beef stock that was a good soup base.

Another plus is that if you use yellow onions, the skins add a wonderful color to the stock!
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GoCubsGo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-27-11 03:05 PM
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6. I have started saving and freezing vegetable trimmings, as someone here suggested
I have a big ziplock bag in the freezer that I just keep adding to. When it's full, I make vegetable stock. It's infinitely than any purchased stock one can find. And, cheaper by far. I even save the carrot and potato peels. And, zucchini, butternut squash and eggplant ends. Pretty much anything.
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csziggy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-27-11 07:57 PM
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7. I've only been doing it when I'm doing a major cooking day
But we generate less than a 1 gallon container of organic waste a week, mostly banana peels and coffee grounds. Generally once a week we through that out in the field for the wildlife to have at it. I tried putting it on a compost pile, but the animals got into it, so it was not worth it.

I may start freezing the good stock producing trimmings, though - that's a good idea.

I end up having to buy some stock when I just don't have the energy to make it. But I also only buy it when it on sale - I keep one or two containers in the pantry, just in case.
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Tesha Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-24-11 07:39 PM
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2. Yes - we run our kitchen like this

everything possible gets the Yankee treatment - and...

Leftovers are a major food group here!
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Sienna86 Donating Member (505 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Nov-25-11 12:21 PM
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3. Great article
I try to live/cook this way now. Will work on further incorporating this philosophy.
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EFerrari Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-27-11 03:33 AM
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5. My mother-in-law took me in hand as a very young wife
and she taught me to run the house this way. She was a treasure.
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