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my name is Grasswire and I am an apple hoarder

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grasswire Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-30-11 10:37 PM
Original message
my name is Grasswire and I am an apple hoarder
Today was the last day of the season at farmers market, where a man and woman sell the 44 varieties of apples from their farm. I have been their regular patron over the summer, and have a freezer stocked to bursting with Gravenstein applesauce and sliced Gravensteins for winter pies. I have tried various varieties from them. Today being the last day, I seized on a full box of Spitzenburgs and a bag of Cox's gold. And she sold me on another bag of big beautiful apples but I'll be damned if I can remember the name of the variety. And it is a real tasty, firm apple -- ate one out of hand today and also had some in waldorf salad for supper.

If I had any room or use, I would many many more varieties -- they just seem like real treasures!

Do you hoard any kind of produce?
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canetoad Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-31-11 02:45 AM
Response to Original message
1. Not really
I live in the state of Victoria, Australia. It's about as big as the UK but has been recognised as possibly the most bio/eco diverse place on the planet; mountain snowfields to desert.

This means that at any given time of the year, we will have locally produced fruit and veg that is fresh and seasonal. I don't have a lot of land so really have no excess crops worth preserving. I doubt I'd do that anyway - I'm lucky to have a group of neighbours who trade carrots for parsley, apricots for silverbeet and so on.....

I can't really imagine hoarding apples because shortly there will be berries, then stonefruits, then the winter citrus and each transition is welcome.

Not far from me is a specialist heritage orchard http://www.about-australia.com/travel-guides/victoria/m... /

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GoCubsGo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-31-11 10:42 AM
Response to Original message
2. Winter squashes.
I love them, especially butternut and spaghetti squashes. They're so versatile. But, at over a buck a pound most times, they're not affordable. When the local grocer has them for 69 cents per pound, I stock up. Fortunately, they keep well, and cooked spaghetti squash freezes well.
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grasswire Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-01-11 04:35 PM
Response to Reply #2
8. I could go for a dozen beautiful winter squash varieties...
...if I had a mantle or a big farm table in the kitchen. They are so gorgeous -- I especially love those ones that are greyish-greenish. Too pretty to eat!
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eleny Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-31-11 11:47 AM
Response to Original message
3. I"m working my way through seeding a bunch of pomegranates
I'm keeping bags of them in the deep freeze so I have fresh/frozen ones next summer. Any time they're on sale until January I'm getting a batch to prep for the freezer. I'm also enjoying them fresh until January. But I vowed not to be caught short when the stores can't get them in after the holidays.
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grasswire Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-31-11 12:18 PM
Response to Reply #3
5. how do you prep them for the freezer? n/t
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eleny Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-31-11 05:09 PM
Response to Reply #5
6. What I'm doing...
First I used this method to take the seeds out. So much easier holding them under water.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sHyqoeB0Wlk

Spread the seeds out on a cookie sheet lined with foil
I covered the seeds with some waxed paper
Put them in the freezer for an hour or two
Then I put them in plastic freezer bags - a one quart bag holds the seeds of 4 poms
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TuxedoKat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-15-11 11:17 AM
Response to Reply #6
12. I tried freezing
parts of some years ago and noticed that the seeds got cloudy from freezing. They didn't look that appetizing after that. I'll try your method though.
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Liberal_in_LA Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-31-11 12:04 PM
Response to Original message
4. lol. no.
but your apples sound tasty
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yellerpup Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-01-11 04:33 PM
Response to Original message
7. You are so funny, you mad apple hoarder!
Back away from the farm stands and call your sponsor! :hi:
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grasswire Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Nov-07-11 02:36 AM
Response to Reply #7
9. you funny too!
I am happy to report that the two Spitzenberg pies I made are as fine as pies made from my beloved Gravensteins. Slightly different outcomes, but I really like the variety and will use them again when I can.

Oh noes. My supply is shrinking.
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yellerpup Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-16-11 09:35 AM
Response to Reply #9
14. Mmmm. Love to have a slice of apple pie.
I'm not worried about your shrinking supply. Something tells me that the Apple Fairy will bless you again before too much longer.
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tigereye Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Nov-11-11 08:01 AM
Response to Original message
10. I bought boxes of different apples from the CSA this year
Edited on Fri Nov-11-11 08:40 AM by tigereye
am eating Winesaps now- so good, so sweet! I haven't had those since I was a kid.

But I haven't seen that many varieties of apples (40 plus! wow), ever. Some of the ones you name I have never heard of or seen. I did go to an apple fest last fall, but I think I missed it this year. i had a rare Amish Black apple there that was scrumptious!


I like Jonathans myself- spicy and crisp. Clearly I need to find out more about all the varieties of apples. I know the conventional ones- Honey Crisp, Jonathan, Jonagold, Granny Smith, Macs, Winesaps, Cortlands, Romes, Red and Golden Delicious (nothing could be farther from the truth re the reds), Gala (ok but kind of bland I think), Pink Lady, Fuji, Empire, Braeburn and Cameo -all the supermarket apples and derivatives, I guess.

Clearly I have had very few apples, judging by this list of all the varieties! :wow:

http://www.orangepippin.com/apples
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freshwest Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-13-11 05:07 PM
Response to Original message
11. You sound okay to me. How are you prepping the apples for freezing, please?
I can't resist fresh apples but can't eat them fast enough if I buy a lot of them to not lose some. Are you slicing, coring, adding lemon juice, or how are you making them ready for freezing?

And are they only good for baking or applesauce after freezing? Just need to know that before I try doing that.
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grasswire Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-15-11 01:44 PM
Response to Reply #11
13. Yeah, they are pretty much only for cooking after freezing.
I have only used them for pie. I slice, toss in apple juice, and freeze.
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NRaleighLiberal Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Nov-18-11 10:50 PM
Response to Original message
15. You are so lucky - Cox's and Spitzenburgs....just great varieties -
Each year we order apples from Tree Mendus in Michigan - they have hundreds of varieties of heirloom apples. (my current and ongoing addiction is heirloom tomatoes - but apples....nearly as much fun!).

Today I found York Mountaineer at a grocery store at a good price - another great, very old apple.
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grasswire Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-19-11 12:29 AM
Response to Reply #15
16. wow, never heard of that one
I agree. The varieties are sooo interesting!
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