Democratic Underground Latest Greatest Lobby Journals Search Options Help Login
Google

Best gluten free bed recipe? Anyone?

Printer-friendly format Printer-friendly format
Printer-friendly format Email this thread to a friend
Printer-friendly format Bookmark this thread
This topic is archived.
Home » Discuss » DU Groups » Home & Family » Cooking & Baking Group Donate to DU
 
Left coast liberal Donating Member (889 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Sep-17-09 07:10 PM
Original message
Best gluten free bed recipe? Anyone?
I have tried a bunch. Some taste ok but the texture is pretty off putting.

This is for my 5 year old son who is allergic to wheat/gluten.

Wish I could find a good one. Never have been a baker but I am trying more now since we found out about his diet.

Would like any input.

http://coaxingwordsfromshea.blogspot.com/2008/10/how-is...
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
Warpy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Sep-17-09 09:14 PM
Response to Original message
1. Well, I have a cotton futon and buckwheat hull pillows
so I'm pretty sure my bed is gluten free.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
supernova Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Sep-18-09 10:15 AM
Response to Reply #1
3. LOL!
Edited on Fri Sep-18-09 10:15 AM by supernova
Thanks for the laugh.


I know the OP was a mistype, but serendipitous ones like this are truly what's fun about English.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Left coast liberal Donating Member (889 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Sep-18-09 03:31 PM
Response to Reply #1
8. I know and they probably taste better than most of the recipes...
...I have tried.

So, is it impossible? Or just really hard?

:hi:
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
flamin lib Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Sep-18-09 08:38 AM
Response to Original message
2. Jokes about sleeping furniture aside, celiac sprue is no laughing matter.
My MIL was a victim and I tried to provide a gluten free environment for her. It's virtually impossible. The best you can hope for is that you can minimize contamination of the diet. Yeah, think of it as contamination, it makes it easier to control the wheat beast. It's every where; food coloring, chicken bouillon cubes, artificial flavorings and it's a filler for many prepared spices.

The good news is you're not alone. Ceiliac is one of the most common conditions in white euro ethnic people. Keith Olberman has Ceiliac sprue. I think it's payback for cycle cell, but that's just me . . .

Start here: http://www.celiac.com / Then get involved in support groups. Many have local chapters and meet-ups. Google is your friend.

Buy a bread machine. We spent a bundle on one that was programmable and had bells and whistles but in the end didn't make any better bread than the cheap stuff. Note: GoodWill stores are full of bread makers for $5. Many have original packaging! Buy two or three and make different breads all at one time. You'll have to refrigerate them because fresh breads without all the preservatives only last a few days.

Breads won't have that soft gooey texture no matter what you try. They tend to be dry and hard. Texture isn't all bad tho, you can play off it by using things like slivered almonds and raisins. If it's gonna be dry it might as well carry some crunch too, right?

The hardest part for you and your child is coming to grips with the fact that other kids can eat stuff that he can't. Hell, my MIL at a mature 70 and a MA from Mount Holyoke couldn't get her head around it (and that lead to a LOT of clean-up). Parties at your house can have cupcakes with ice cream or whip cream topping (check the ice cream label for wheat products) to make the texture more "normal".

Anyway, good luck and if you need support PM me. Been there, done that.

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Left coast liberal Donating Member (889 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Sep-18-09 03:35 PM
Response to Reply #2
10. Great advise. Thank you!
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
supernova Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Sep-18-09 10:41 AM
Response to Original message
4. Different texture you will have to get used to
if you still want to eat baked goods, I'm sorry to say. The alternatives to gluten, which gives breads and other baked goods their structure, are xanthan or guar gum. Right, it's the same stuff you see in commercial ice creams at the grocery store. You can find it in the baking section of any store that caters to people with food allergies.

I'm not a full celiac, but I have wheat sensitivity. That means I can eat it maybe 1-2x/week without problems. Anymore than that and my GI tract complains, so does my skin and depressed mood.

:P

I've gotten used to having a life without wheat, at least here at home. So I'm always looking for substitutes.

Even if you find alternatives, read the packages carefully. Lots of times, the alternative is processed with the same machinery the factory uses for wheat, so for your purposes it's contaminated. They are supposed to say if the product is processed with or completely seperately from wheat products.

alternatives:

nut flours (especially almond and hazelnut). This is an additive, for maybe 1/4 of your total "flour." More than that, and you've got quite a heavy product, both pound and caloriewise. :P

buckwheat (makes great pancakes),

garbanzo flour (good, but more for savory things. The raw bean back flavor can taste odd. Adding dry herbs and spices to it helps a lot.
potato flour

You can buy ready to cook GF baking mixes, including bread, but they are expensive, IMO.

I haven't found a great recipe, yet.. but this one looks promising. I might try it:

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/232719/allergy...






Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Warpy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Sep-18-09 11:51 AM
Response to Reply #4
5. I live in the southwest, where tortillas rule
and corn tortillas were made for people with celiac, I swear. While the innards have to be seasoned differently to blend with the corn flavor, the tortilla roll up can be vastly superior to the sandwich, easier to eat without having the contents end up in your lap when you're working through lunch. Sandwich innards can also be tamed by lettuce leaf rollups.

Instead of pasta, think about polenta. I've made great polenta lasagnas for people with wheat allergy. Fried polenta in the morning with real maple syrup is better than pancakes, IMO, and you can get prefab polenta in the grocery now.

It's easy to get obsessed by a common food you can't eat, I've been like that about oranges. I've been put into the hospital after trying to eat citrus, so I have to make do with a few drops of lemon or lime juice here and there. I can well imagine the smell of toast in the morning would drive a celiac person nuts with frustration, I've been there.

However, I find the alternatives are usually better than the substitutes.

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
supernova Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Sep-18-09 12:14 PM
Response to Reply #5
6. Corn is a good alternative, if you aren't allergic to it
I happily eat cornbread made with straight cornmeal, no added flour. That's the way my family has always made it.

That's why they tell you to experiment with the gums, since xanthan gum is derived from corn.

Polenta can be good, ditto grits.

I would think not being able to digest corn would be an even bigger problem since it's in even more stuff than wheat. :crazy:
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Love Bug Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Sep-20-09 12:13 PM
Response to Reply #6
12. I know someone who is allergic to corn
and she can't tolerate HFCS, which is in practically EVERYTHING.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
buzzycrumbhunger Donating Member (793 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Sep-18-09 12:15 PM
Response to Original message
7. Would a raw foods cookbook help?
I make sprouted breads and crackers in my dehydrator that are awesome (you basically sprout any grain 2-3 days, grind into a snotty mush, season to taste, spread, and dry). Besides bread, DeBoles' artichoke pasta is great and comes in many shapes. Shirataki noodles (those tofu-looking bagged noodles in the organic food corner of the supermarket--which aren't tofu at all) are another gluten-free food that also happens to be insanely low in calories (like 9 calories to a bag). You do want to rinse them thoroughly before cooking, which they do almost instantaneously. They also keep in the fridge almost indefinitely.

If you google gluten-free recipes, there are thousands of hits, including some specifically for kids. This one looks like it has some yummy bread recipes.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Left coast liberal Donating Member (889 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Sep-18-09 03:32 PM
Response to Original message
9. Sorry for the typo but appreciate your humor.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
hippywife Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Sep-18-09 04:21 PM
Response to Original message
11. This website has had some very good recipes
that are gluten-free. I'm not celiac and I haven't made any of them yet, but I've had it bookmarked for a long time because I think they look and sound delicious. I'm sure she has bread recipes in here somewhere.

Hope you find what you need. :hug:
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
DU AdBot (1000+ posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view 
this author's profile Click to add 
this author to your buddy list Click to add 
this author to your Ignore list Fri Nov 21st 2014, 06:03 AM
Response to Original message
Advertisements [?]
 Top

Home » Discuss » DU Groups » Home & Family » Cooking & Baking Group Donate to DU

Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.1 Copyright 1997-2002 DCScripts.com
Software has been extensively modified by the DU administrators


Important Notices: By participating on this discussion board, visitors agree to abide by the rules outlined on our Rules page. Messages posted on the Democratic Underground Discussion Forums are the opinions of the individuals who post them, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Democratic Underground, LLC.

Home  |  Discussion Forums  |  Journals |  Store  |  Donate

About DU  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

Got a message for Democratic Underground? Click here to send us a message.

© 2001 - 2011 Democratic Underground, LLC