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Can you mix most cookies in a food processor?

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eleny Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-25-08 11:27 AM
Original message
Can you mix most cookies in a food processor?
Not many recipes suggest using a food processor to mix cookie dough. But after making my hazelnut cookies in the processor earlier this week I'd like to mix all my cookies in it. Is there a reason I shouldn't? The pulse feature doesn't seem to overmix the dough.

What I like most is how fast it works and I don't seem to make a mess.
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The empressof all Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-25-08 12:26 PM
Response to Original message
1. I think for some cookies it works really well
I do spritz in the processor. Of course you wouldn't want to do the chip part of chocolate chip cookies in one. You'd still need to do add ins by hand.
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eleny Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-25-08 12:48 PM
Response to Reply #1
3. Thanks...
It's been a long time since I've made spritz cookies. I'll have to dig out my press. Although they're my favorite cookie, I'm often a lazy cookie baker. The processor might be just the ticket. I especially like the spritz with the sliver of red cherry on top.

:hi:
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NMDemDist2 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-25-08 12:44 PM
Response to Original message
2. my MiLaw makes her bread in a food processor so if it can do
yeast dough I don't know why it couldn't do cookies
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eleny Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-25-08 12:57 PM
Response to Reply #2
4. That sounds interesting
I just looked for sites with instructions for kneading bread with the processor. If my machine is powerful enough I might give it a try. Sounds like fun!
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Warpy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-25-08 01:54 PM
Response to Original message
5. Right, the secret is that pulse button
although you can cream the butter and shortening, add the eggs and vanilla while it's running steadily. Once that flour goes in, though, you've got to keep the mixing minimal so you don't activate the gluten or you'll get some weird cookies.

I still find the Kitchen Aid mixer does as good a job in the same amount of time with less cleanup.
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eleny Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-25-08 02:01 PM
Response to Reply #5
6. Thanks for the KitchenAid comparison
And I didn't realize it was a gluten issue. The hazelnut cookie recipe cautioned to pulse just until the dough formed a ball and that was successful for me.
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Stinky The Clown Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-25-08 02:09 PM
Response to Original message
7. The speed of a food processor makes the chance of overmixing very real
Most recipes tell you to use pulse. For good reason. The speed can cause gluten develop faster than you can imagine. Plus, you might lose some texture in cookies that might actually want texture.

Personally, I find the Kitchenaid easier to clean and more forgiving in the mixing.
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eleny Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-25-08 04:28 PM
Response to Reply #7
10. Although I can put the processor cup & blade in the dishwasher....
Seems like I should fall back on the mixer for results that are more favorable. Thanks Husb!
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displacedtexan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-25-08 04:14 PM
Response to Original message
8. There's also a reason for adding ingredients in a certain order...
and treating them in a certain way.

The creaming process is the holy grail of baked goods.
Take your time with this part: Cream the beejesus out of the butter
before you add the sugar; cream the butter and sugar thoroughly before
you add the eggs; cream the butter, sugar & eggs thoroughly before you
add the flavoring (vanilla).

Historically, the main reason for this method is, believe it or not, to save money:
if your butter is bad, you won't have wasted sugar, eggs, and vanilla. If your
eggs are bad, you won't have wasted your butter and sugar, etc. And the
vanilla is the most expensive ingredient (by volume) in
your recipe. That's why it's added last during the creaming.

Note: If you're adding nuts or chips, coat them in the flour and separate them
into another bowl, to be added later by hand.

After the creaming process, there's the "running in" of the dry stuff: use a
spatula to add individual scoops of the flour mixture to the wet stuff. Mix
only until each scoop is incorporated. No more.

Now, chill the dough thoroughly.

If you want round puffy cookies, spray a little PAM on a melon baller scoop
and pack the dough inside tightly with your thumb. Flick it out with your index
finger and smooth the edges so it stays rounded. Place on parchment or silpat
for even baking.

Bake hot and fast for crispy edges and chewy middles. 375 degrees
for 6-7 minutes for this size cookie (2 to 21/2 inch cookies).

Cool quickly (pull parchment or silpat off the cookie sheet asap and
let the cookies cool on the counter.

Don't mind me. I'm a personal pastry chef, and I just love baking.





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eleny Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-25-08 04:27 PM
Response to Reply #8
9. I'm sure that many will find your tips and the history very helpful
Thanks so much for your reply. I'm going to print it out and keep handy. It was enjoyable reading, too.
:hi:
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hippywife Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-25-08 05:34 PM
Response to Reply #8
11. I agree with eleny...
very interesting but I can see the sense in the history of the order of addition. I was also told that sifters were originally invented to sift the moths out of flour before using. I don't always sift my dry ingredients out of sheer laziness. What's your experience with sifting vs. not? It seems that it's not really an issue with my flour so much as other ingredients such as baking powder and cocoa.

Now that you've outted yourself as a pastry chef, I guess you get to be the resident expert in that area. LOL :hi:
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Stinky The Clown Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-25-08 07:30 PM
Response to Reply #8
12. With open arms, we welcome you to our long running and very merry band!
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