Democratic Underground Latest Greatest Lobby Journals Search Options Help Login
Google

Horned Dinosaur Found In New Mexico

Printer-friendly format Printer-friendly format
Printer-friendly format Email this thread to a friend
Printer-friendly format Bookmark this thread
This topic is archived.
Home » Discuss » Topic Forums » Science Donate to DU
 
Judi Lynn Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jun-05-10 02:45 AM
Original message
Horned Dinosaur Found In New Mexico
Horned Dinosaur Found In New Mexico
Predecessor To Triceratops, Torosaurus
POSTED: 12:31 pm MDT June 4, 2010
UPDATED: 12:33 pm MDT June 4, 2010

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. -- A new horned dinosaur, one of the largest known, has been discovered in northwestern New Mexico.

It's called Ojoceratops.

Scientists said the newly discovered dinosaur was a predecessor to Triceratops and Torosaurus, two well-known dinosaurs from the end of the Cretaceous Period, 65 million to 70 million years ago.

The new dinosaur was discovered in the summer of 2005 in the Bisti/De-na-zin Wilderness of northwestern New Mexico by Denver Fowler, who is now a Ph.D. student at Montana State University.

More:
http://www.koat.com/news/23795304/detail.html

~~~~~

Area paleontology expert names dinosaur discovered in New Mexico
By T.W. BURGER, The Patriot-News
June 01, 2010, 9:31PM

It is not often that somebody gets to name a dinosaur.

Robert M. Sullivan, senior curator of paleontology and geology at The State Museum of Pennsylvania in Harrisburg recently got that chance.

He named a new link in the family of horned dinosaurs that scientists say lived 65 million to 70 million years ago in what is now northwestern New Mexico.

Meet Ojoceratops fowleri, a three-horned vegetarian beast of about 17 to 20 feet in length.

Sullivan said in life it would have been larger than a hippopotamus but slightly smaller than an elephant, so you probably wouldnt want it roaming around in your backyard.

It would definitely eat your shrubbery, Sullivan said.

The discovery is detailed in a book released this week. Sullivan and Spencer G. Lucas, curator of geology, New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque, co-authored the study describing the ceratopsid dinosaur, which appeared this week in the book, New Perspectives on Horned Dinosaurs: The Royal Tyrrell Museum Ceratopsian Symposium, published by Indiana University Press.The book is available for about $110.

Fowleri is believed to be one of the last surviving ceratopsid dinosaurs, a distinct group of plant-eating dinosaurs known for their head frill and facial horns on the end of their beaks and over their eyes. They lived in both Asia and North America during the late cretaceous period, roughly 65 million to 95 million years ago.

More:
http://www.pennlive.com/midstate/index.ssf/2010/06/area...
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
John Q. Citizen Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jun-05-10 02:48 AM
Response to Original message
1. I didn't know it had gone missing.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
old mark Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jun-05-10 03:28 AM
Response to Original message
2. I thoiught this was about John McCain who had somehow wandered
out of Arizona.


mark
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
aquart Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jun-05-10 03:51 AM
Response to Original message
3. He got to name a dinosaur!
That is so supremely cool.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
freebrew Donating Member (478 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jun-05-10 04:41 PM
Response to Original message
4. Pictures please....
jk
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Judi Lynn Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-06-10 07:08 AM
Response to Reply #4
5. Looks as if images are limited at the moment since it just got its name!
Here's something which was published with the news release:



Robert M. Sullivan, Senior Curator of Paleontology
and Geology at the State Museum of Pennsylvania,
Harrisburg, with Ojoceratops fowleri.



Ojoceratops fowleri skull reconstruction. Shaded
areas represent known fossil material. Illustration
by Matt Celeskey, New Mexico Museum of Natural
History and Science.


Bisti reveals large horned dinosaur
Discovery made in 2005
Updated: Thursday, 03 Jun 2010, 1:21 PM MDT
Published : Thursday, 03 Jun 2010, 1:18 PM MDT

Web Producer: Bill Diven
ALBUQUERQUE (KRQE) - One of the largest horned dinosaurs roaming the world 70 million years ago has been discovered in northwestern New Mexico, according to a study published Thursday.

Named ojoceratops fowleri, the creature was a precursor to two well-known horned dinosaurs, triceratops and torosaurus.

The fossilized remains, discovered in 2005 in the Bureau of Land Management's Bisti/De-na-zin Wilderness , included the frill, a large boney structure that curves up at the back of the head.

Ojoceratops is a very distinctive beast, Dr. Robert M. Sullivan, vertebrate paleontologist, said in a news release from the New Mexico Museum of History and Science. The frill is very different from Triceratops and Torosaurus, being squared off at the back unlike Triceratops, and lacking any openings in the frill, like in Torosaurus.

Sullivan, senior curator of paleontology and geology at the State Museum of Pennsylvania, led a series of expedition that recovered the fossilized bones. He and Dr. Spencer Lucas, curator of geology at the New Mexico museum, co-authored the study in the peer-reviewed book "The Horned Dinosaurs" published Thursday by Indiana University Press.

Field assistant Denver Fowler, who is now a Ph.D. student at Montana State University, made the actual discovery in the Ojo Alamo Formation, a rock layer older than some dinosaur-bearing formations in the West, Lucas said.

"Although bits and pieces of horned dinosaurs have been known from this rock formation for many years, the frill bone is incredibly important for finally figuring out what this animal looked like, Andy Farke, a ceratopsian expert, said. In combination with other specimens, we have a much better idea of what New Mexico was like at the close of the age of dinosaurs."

....
http://www.krqe.com/dpp/news/environment/bisti-reveals-...
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
eppur_se_muova Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jun-09-10 12:54 AM
Response to Original message
6. Misleading headline.
***Fossilized remains*** of dinosaur found in New Mexico.

I know. I do this every time.

But whenever I see a headline about "dinosaur found..." I have a brief flash of a "Calvin & Hobbes" moment in which I'm thinking "a REAL dinosaur? Wow!".
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
DU AdBot (1000+ posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view 
this author's profile Click to add 
this author to your buddy list Click to add 
this author to your Ignore list Wed Apr 16th 2014, 02:51 PM
Response to Original message
Advertisements [?]
 Top

Home » Discuss » Topic Forums » Science Donate to DU

Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.1 Copyright 1997-2002 DCScripts.com
Software has been extensively modified by the DU administrators


Important Notices: By participating on this discussion board, visitors agree to abide by the rules outlined on our Rules page. Messages posted on the Democratic Underground Discussion Forums are the opinions of the individuals who post them, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Democratic Underground, LLC.

Home  |  Discussion Forums  |  Journals |  Store  |  Donate

About DU  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

Got a message for Democratic Underground? Click here to send us a message.

© 2001 - 2011 Democratic Underground, LLC