Democratic Underground Latest Greatest Lobby Journals Search Options Help Login
Google

NASA Scientists Find Clues That Life Began in Deep Space

Printer-friendly format Printer-friendly format
Printer-friendly format Email this thread to a friend
Printer-friendly format Bookmark this thread
This topic is archived.
Home » Discuss » Topic Forums » Science Donate to DU
 
Mr. McD Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-28-05 11:42 AM
Original message
NASA Scientists Find Clues That Life Began in Deep Space
"Scientists believe the molecules needed to make a cells membrane, and thus for the origin of life, are all over space. This discovery implies that life could be everywhere in the universe," said Dr. Louis Allamandola, the team's leader.

Using simple, everyday chemicals, researchers from Ames' Astrochemistry Laboratory and the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of California, Santa Cruz, have created chemical structures that mimic the membranous structures found in all life forms. "This process happens all the time in the dense molecular clouds of space," Allamandola said.

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/ames/news/releases/2001/01_...
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
Caution Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-28-05 11:45 AM
Response to Original message
1. but...but...genesis...but
adam and eve...but...
and the heads of Creationists explode.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
The Backlash Cometh Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-28-05 12:05 PM
Response to Reply #1
3. I've known for a long time this planet IS the thirteenth tribe.
Lost in Space.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
papau Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-28-05 11:49 AM
Response to Original message
2. We still can't get spontaneous cell membranes - but cell-like membranes kn
We still can't get spontaneous cell membranes - but cell-like membranes known as vesicles that resemble the membranous structures are found in space - interesting.

Some PHD friends working on this told me a few years ago that they thought they were close - but I have yet to see an announcement (which may well be my fault :-) )

It would be interesting is they truly did get workable cell membranes - even if just similiar and not exactly like ours.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
pmbryant Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-28-05 12:29 PM
Response to Original message
4. Long way from "membranous structures" to life
Interstellar molecular clouds are fascinating places, but why presume that life on Earth was supposedly kick-started there?

Is it impossible to form these structures on Earth?

--Peter
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
gottaB Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-29-05 08:08 AM
Response to Reply #4
5. that was my first thought-- perhaps it has to do with how planets form
From the study's conclusion:

This paper presents the laboratory simulation of an interstellar ice mixture proven to produce amphiphilic vesicle-forming compounds similar to those found in primitive meteorites, such as the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite. Starting from a very simple, yet astrophysically relevant, ice mixture (water, methanol, ammonia, and carbon monoxide), a very complex mixture of compounds, including amphiphiles and fluorescent molecules, is generated on low temperature photolysis. The ready formation of these insoluble compounds from photolyzed ices comprised of simple molecules suggests not only that this process might be the source of their origin in meteorites, but that the delivery of such compounds by comets, meteorites, and interplanetary dust particles during the late heavy bombardment period may have played an influential role in the origin of life on Earth. Because our experimental conditions for ice photolysis were designed to simulate the environments of dense interstellar molecular clouds (the birth sites of new stars and planetary systems), the delivery of these materials to the surfaces of newly formed planets may be a universal process. The level of extraterrestrial molecular complexity is just now becoming apparent, and the full implications of this chemical input to the early Earth, and by implication to other habitable planets, are likely to be far reaching.

http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/98/3/815


Surely somebody will chime in with an argument about chirality. A very interesting topic, but way over my head.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
On the Road Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-04-05 04:08 PM
Response to Reply #4
6. Yes, It's a Long Way to a Cell
but this is one intermediate step. There are lots of others.

I agree more intermediate steps need to be identified. That's one reason that the nannobacteria controversy interests me -- regardles of whether they're really life forms, they are the KIND of intermediate step that should have occured.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
WindRavenX Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-04-05 10:40 PM
Response to Original message
7. Nothing new really
We've found amino acids and fragments of RNA on asteroids.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
DU AdBot (1000+ posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view 
this author's profile Click to add 
this author to your buddy list Click to add 
this author to your Ignore list Thu Apr 24th 2014, 10:58 AM
Response to Original message
Advertisements [?]
 Top

Home » Discuss » Topic Forums » Science Donate to DU

Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.1 Copyright 1997-2002 DCScripts.com
Software has been extensively modified by the DU administrators


Important Notices: By participating on this discussion board, visitors agree to abide by the rules outlined on our Rules page. Messages posted on the Democratic Underground Discussion Forums are the opinions of the individuals who post them, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Democratic Underground, LLC.

Home  |  Discussion Forums  |  Journals |  Store  |  Donate

About DU  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

Got a message for Democratic Underground? Click here to send us a message.

© 2001 - 2011 Democratic Underground, LLC