Democratic Underground Latest Greatest Lobby Journals Search Options Help Login
Google

Anyone here ever tried scanning a 35mm slide to look for a faint comet?

Printer-friendly format Printer-friendly format
Printer-friendly format Email this thread to a friend
Printer-friendly format Bookmark this thread
This topic is archived.
Home » Discuss » Topic Forums » Science Donate to DU
 
Up2Late Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-15-06 09:45 PM
Original message
Anyone here ever tried scanning a 35mm slide to look for a faint comet?
I'm in the process of scanning a lot of old slides and negatives (most are not Astronomy shots) and just scanned a slide I took in 1985 when Halley's Comet made it's last return, but without much luck.

I have a fairly good scanner (it goes up to 2400dpi for slides and Negatives) and a few fairly good slides that I shot on Kodachrome 64, but when scanning an almost black slide, I get a lot of random noise in the scan.

Any advice?

I don't know if I actually got it on film, because I couldn't really see it with the naked eye, I just shot where it was supposed to be (near Sagittarius), but is there a technique to scan an process it which yields the best results to see if I did get it?
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
liberal N proud Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-15-06 10:00 PM
Response to Original message
1. I have had experience with scanning old 35mm slided and negatives
on a Cannon Scanner.
You need high resolution which will boost the file size but required for good transfer.
Then you need a good tool to clean up the picture, there is some fading or degrading that takes place over time.
I have ArcSoft PhotoStudio but that is not necessarily the best. A good PhotoShop program would be the best bet for cleanup.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Occulus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Dec-16-06 12:04 AM
Response to Original message
2. The only thing I can think of relates to digital photo editing
but does your scanner software have the ability to adjust the levels of the scanned image's shadows, midtones, and so on? I'm not talking about RGB values, but shadow and lighting values.

I don't know if scanner software in general does that, since I don't have one and haven't for a long time. It's about the only thing I can think of.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Up2Late Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Dec-16-06 04:55 AM
Response to Reply #2
3. Yes, It does have those adjustments...
...that's mainly the kind of advice I'm hoping for.

Advice like, should I push the levels all the way to the extremes (Highest contrast) or try to keep it as flat as possible (low contrast) to make it easier to find any trace of the comet once I start fiddling with the scan in Photoshop.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
DU AdBot (1000+ posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view 
this author's profile Click to add 
this author to your buddy list Click to add 
this author to your Ignore list Tue Jul 29th 2014, 06:38 AM
Response to Original message
Advertisements [?]
 Top

Home » Discuss » Topic Forums » Science Donate to DU

Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.1 Copyright 1997-2002 DCScripts.com
Software has been extensively modified by the DU administrators


Important Notices: By participating on this discussion board, visitors agree to abide by the rules outlined on our Rules page. Messages posted on the Democratic Underground Discussion Forums are the opinions of the individuals who post them, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Democratic Underground, LLC.

Home  |  Discussion Forums  |  Journals |  Store  |  Donate

About DU  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

Got a message for Democratic Underground? Click here to send us a message.

© 2001 - 2011 Democratic Underground, LLC